#1
Like when I play a chord there is this high pitched noise coming out the in background, sort of like a dog whistle (but within our hearing threadhold, obviously). Any reason why my amp would be doing this? It's a B-52 AT-212.
#3
It's a new amp, I got it the other day. But I am running the gain sort of high with a moderate volume for the gain channel but the master volume is kinda low.
#4
are u talking about feedback?

even with high gain ur amp shouldnt be feeding back unless ur cranking it a bit.

i dont know much about B52 amps, just looked them up on musicians friend and out of 4 reviews, two said they had feedback problems.

i guess, u can try swapping out the guitar chord.
and facing the amp away from u as u play, but if u cant resolve it make sure u do something about this potential problem before the 30 days run out.
Jenneh

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#5
I don't think it's feedback. I get it a lot if like I play a G chord and really play the high e hard. Like the high e really makes it audible. Could it be something wrong with the tubes?
#6
i doubt it's the tubes... try switching the guitar cable... my old crate solid-state combo did this when it was on it's way out... the problem was a ****ed up input jack, the contacts were worn to hell. Guitar cables that have shoddy wiring can do the same thing. If a cable switch doesn't do anything (if possible open up the cable's connector and inspect both solder points for loose joints or to see if the two conductors are making any contact), it's either feedback, or it could just be the amp. Try turning down the highs as well. If that doesn't work, gain is the last option. doesn't work, time to refund and get a new one

However, my valveking does this a lot... but thats when it's fully cranked with full gain and boost and i'm 1 foot away from it... feedback much?
#7
It shouldn't be the cable, I'm using a new monster cable that I bought when I bought the amp. I'll try to see if it's feedback tomorrow when I can play loud (parents asleep), since I do play pretty close to the amp.
#8
When you have the volume cranked theres always going to be feedback. Facing away from the amp isnt always the solution. I always find myself dancing about my band's tiny practice room trying to find a spot where I dont get feedback...amazingly enough it usually ends up being close the amp, facing it.

But I dont know man...maybe one of your fingers is hitting a string thats not supposed to be hit and youre getting harmonics...
#9
Quote by Link47
I don't think it's feedback. I get it a lot if like I play a G chord and really play the high e hard. Like the high e really makes it audible. Could it be something wrong with the tubes?


well that might be a fret buzz or a muting problem, maybe the amp too.

is there a fret where its more obvious?
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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#10
it sounds a bit like microphonics to me. It could be your pickups, you lead/cord/cable, or your preamp valves.

http://www.felineguitars.com/services/repairs.html (scroll to the bottom)
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#11
When I was messing with it last ngiht I tried to turn the volume and gains up all the way and there was no buzzing. It's only when I play. And it seems to be centered on the B string. So when I get home from work today I'm going to see if it is only the B string that does it. Cause if it is, I guess it's fretbuzz then?
#12
well it really depends.

if ur only getting a "ringing" noise after hitting one string, then sounds like thats the problem.
if you think that's it, then raising that string is easy enough to check.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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#13
Well, it sounds like you're describing feedback, so try this...

Set up your amp like you normally do and turn it on without anything plugged into it. now turn up the volume. If you get any feedback, then it's faulty tubes that have become microphonic.
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#14
Quote by Crunchmeister
Well, it sounds like you're describing feedback, so try this...

Set up your amp like you normally do and turn it on without anything plugged into it. now turn up the volume. If you get any feedback, then it's faulty tubes that have become microphonic.


ah, cool, I didn't realise you could diagnose microphonic tubes like that, crunch.

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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
Depends on how microphonic the tubes are. The easy way, if the preamp tubes are easily accessible, is to turn on the amp with nothing plugged in as I described, and tap the tubes with a pencil. If you can hear the tapping thru the speaker, then the tube is microphonic. This method will help if the tube is just staritng to go bad.

When the tubes aren't easily accessible cranking the volume will work. If tubes are just staring to go, they may not feed back. But it sounds like he's constantly getting that noise, so that should work if it's the tubes. If it isn't, then it's probably something else wrong with it.
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#16
check the cords i had a bad cord once and my amp squaled crazy just straighten the cords out
#17
^ asian, yeah, that too.

Crunch: cheers! mine are kind of accessible- there are 3 metal bars covering the front, you can see the tubes through them. I still have visions of me breaking the damn tubes though, lol. How hard do you tap them? i'm assuming pretty softly, lol.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#18
All it needs is a light tap. If the tubes are microphonic, you'll hear the tap clearly thru the speaker, just like if you were lightly tapping a microphone to test it.
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#19
^ ok, cool. I'll have to try that, just to see (i get quite a bit of feedback, I assumed that it was the idiocy of trying to crank a 100 watt halfstack in a 12x9 room...)



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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#20
Okay, I cranked everything with nothing was plugged in and it sounded fine. It's only when I play a note on either the high E or B strings that it makes the sound. The sound is sort of like a high frequency ringing after the note is played. I'm not sure if it is my guitar or the amp, so I guess I'll have to borrow one of my friends guitars to find out.
#21
Crunch, my Mesa manual says it's normal for the preamp tubes to make some noise when you tap them, and it's the power tubes that are supposed to be silent when tapped. Is this specific to Mesa?

Quote by Mesa Manual
TUBE NOISE: Often caused by contamination within in a tube, the culprit can usually be identified, and by lightly tapping on the glass, you will probably hear the noise change.

Hearing some noise through the speakers while tapping on the 12AX7?s is normal however. And the one nearer the INPUT will always sound louder because its output is being further amplified by the second 12AX7.

The power tubes should be all but quiet when they are tapped. If crackling or hissing changes with the tapping, you have probably found the problem. To confirm a noisy power tube, merely put the Mark IV on Standby, remove it from its socket and turn it back on. It will cause no damage to run the Mark IV briefly with one power tube missing. You may notice a slight background hum, however, as the push-pull becomes unbalanced. Whenever you are trying to diagnose a suspect tube, keep your other hand on the POWER and STANDBY switches ready to shut them off instantly in the unlikely case you provoke a major short. If you think you?ve located a problem tube but aren?t sure, we recommend substituting the suspect with a new one just to be sure of your diagnoses. You will be doing yourself and us a big favor by just following the simple guidelines previously mentioned regarding tube replacement. You?ll probably be successful with much less effort than is required to disconnect everything and haul the unit to a technician who will basically perform the same simple tests. If the tubes are still within their six-month warranty period, we will happily send you a replacement. Just note the color designation on the tube label so that we can send you the appropriate match. Because your amplifier is an all tube design, it is quite possible that you will at some point experience minor pre-amp tube noise.

DIAGNOSING PRE-AMP TUBE PROBLEMS: Rest assured - this is no cause for alarm and you can take care of the problem yourself in a matter of minutes by simply swapping tubes.

Let us begin by saying; It is a ?very good? idea to keep at least a couple of spare pre-amp tubes on hand at all times to insure uninterrupted performance. These minor pre-amp tube problems can take many forms but can generally be described in two categories: Noise and Microphonics. Noise can be in the form of crackling, sputtering, white noise/hiss and/or hum. Microphonic problems usually appear in the form of a ringing or high pitched squealing that gets worse as the gain or volume is increased thus are more noticeable in the higher gain ?HI? modes. Microphonic problems are easily identified because the problem is still present even with the instruments? volume off or unplugged altogether - unlike pick-up feedback which ceases as the instrument is turned down. Microphonic noise is caused by mechanical vibration and shock: think of banging a microphone around and you?ll understand where the word came from. The best way to approach a pre-amp tube problem is to see if it occurs only in one specific mode or channel. This should lead you to the tube needing replacement. Then all that remains is to swap the suspect tube for a known good performer. If you cannot narrow down the trouble to a specific mode or channel, the problem may be the small tube that drives the power tubes which is operational in all modes and channels. Though rare, a problem with the driver tube would show up in all aspects of performance - so if you can?t narrow the problem down to being mode or channel specific, you may want to try replacing the driver tube. Driver problems generally show themselves in the form of crackling or hum in all modes of performance and/or weak overall output from the amplifier. Occasionally an anemic driver tube will cause the amplifier to sound flat and lifeless, but this is somewhat uncommon, as worn power tubes are a more likely suspect for this type of problem.
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#22
^ well, i tapped my preamp tubes last night (at slightly higher than bedroom volume, and at all gain levels), and I didn't hear anything through the speakers. I couldn't reach the power tubes. I guess I need a longer pencil...
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#23
Quote by Link47
Okay, I cranked everything with nothing was plugged in and it sounded fine. It's only when I play a note on either the high E or B strings that it makes the sound. The sound is sort of like a high frequency ringing after the note is played. I'm not sure if it is my guitar or the amp, so I guess I'll have to borrow one of my friends guitars to find out.



what type of guitar? sorry if u said already.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#24
It's a fender mexican strat with vintage noiseless pickups. It's a '99 and somewhat worn (don't know if that makes a differance).