#1
What's the best way to get my ears to recognize notes better? I'm pretty sketchy in that area now - Some days I'll be right on, others I'll be way off. What can I do to have better note recognition by ear?
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#2
Hours and hours of monotony. Arm yourself with a piano and a blindfold.
#3
^ yeah thats pretty much all you can do alone, or someone constantly quizzing you like in my music theory class
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#6
So basically, there's no way in hell I can have decent note recognition by September first?

My guitar teacher told me that my only weak point is my imperfect ear training. I've been playing for a year and can *usually* find what key something is in pretty easily. I occasionally have trouble matching notes and stuff though. He told me to work on ear training until my next lesson (once a month lessons), and really, I haven't progressed much from where I was. I can bend notes and get them to sound how I want them to (half step up, whole step..), but that only took me a little bit to learn "what sounds right" and know how far to bend to get it to sound in tune.

I don't have a drum machine with a bass line (or any sort of drum machine for that matter), so I can't practice with that, and my guitar teacher told me that learning ear training from string bending takes much, much longer than other methods. He suggested that I play riffs in one spot on the fretboard, then find the same riff somewhere else on the fretboard and play it the same. Would this be the best method to work with?
My Gear:

Washburn WI14 Electric
Washburn D10s Acoustic
Marshall MG100HDFXR Special Edition
Marshall MG412AR Special Edition

Quote by Danno13
^Xenn is my favorite MG owner EVAR.

Quote by jj1565
^ Xenn fav MG user evar
#7
you have to be able to recognize intervals to gain relative pitch, as well as other things such as singing or humming through a major scale and checking yourself on the guitar etc...there are many ways to train your ear, but it all comes with experience and dedicated practice

well, one exercise i like to do is to (if possible) record all the intervals, and listen back to the tape...now, while randomly playing an interval, try to name it - or you can play a note on your guitar, name an interval, and play that note...many possibilities
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#8
Hmm...good advice. I have another related question, though: what about ear training for chords? I know a lot of it is going to be trial and error etc., but are there any 'tricks or tips?'

Case in point: I'm trying to learn a song for which I can't find any tabs, so I'm doing it myself. But I can't figure out the chords...I only know a handful right now, and even when I pick one that sounds close and alter it (into a diminished, add7, suspended, etc) I can't quite get it right. Any ideas?
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#9
just practice listening to them, and in various inversions and with different notes in the melody as well. which will take a lot of effort, i'm not good at it either. Trying to pick out the root from a chord is usually very helpful. That's at least for just hearing individual chords. If you're figuring out a song, then you can make your life easier with your theory knowledge of what chords are a likely progression from the previous. If your song is in A, and the last chord was E7, i'd guess A is the most likely chord to come next, so try it before you try C# or something. Narrow down your choices as well by listening to the melody line and bassline, which are likely going to be chord tones.
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Last edited by sirpsycho85 at Dec 15, 2006,
#10
Learning piano helped me alot... (I know this is ultimate guitar, but a little piano couldn't hurt) every instrument you learn can relate back to piano in someway. Being able to sing helps, so try this. Play a note on guitar or piano (i find piano easier), and then try to sing it. After doing this a couple times, try vice-versa. Your ear will eventually be trained to hear notes as you sing/play them. In Royal Conservatory 7 - the last book on theory I did - it's part of the coarse to be able to pick out notes by ear. So just keep practicing singing specific notes, then playing them.
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#11
Good advice...I've tried relating the unknown chords to my theory knowledge, but I'm just learning that too, so I'm not getting too far with it yet
One thing I didn't think about was using the melody/bass line...it makes sense that they'd be chord tones, that's why it's in key, right? I'll give that another listen.
As for singing, I'm learning that as well...if I throw all of this together, maybe each skill will benifit from the others as I learn them together. I've thought recently about picking up the piano, I'll have to look more seriously into that.
For now the song I'm looking at...I've worked out the melody by trial and error, but once I got the basic notes down the rest of it kind of fell into place (using intervals and such). I'll take another look at my notes and see what fits into the chords. I'm unsure of the key, so I'll be sure to examine that a lot closer too. Maybe one thing I'll do is start listening to songs I know the key of (and can find tabs for) and 'test' myself, checking with the tabs.
Thanks!
"He has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original."
--Alice Cooper, on Marilyn Manson.
#12
first of all, perfect pitch, being able to recognize any note without any point of reference, is extremely rare and some belive that it is not something that can be learned. However, if you are interested in developing relative pitch (being able to recognize one note after hearing another), you can go to www.download.com and download an eartraining program (ear trainer 1.1 is a good one) that will help you wit chord properties, harmony, scale recognizition, and lead/melody. Anyways, Have fun (and don't listen to punk music, if you can even call it that).