#1
Lets say i dont know anyhting about chord progressions, could someone give me the basics?! or link me to a good lesson?
thanks.
#3
thanks.
one more question, what is a dominant chord? is it just a raised 7th? i was under the impression that the 5th degree of a scale is the dominant, do they have anything to do with each other?
help would be much appreciated
#4
Dominant is for now just as a 7 if used in the context of a seventh chord which has a flat 7 so formula is: 1, 3, 5, b7

so if you have C major: c, d, e, f, g, a, b, back to c equals

C = 1
d = 2
e = 3
f = 4
g = 5
a = 6
b = 7

So 1, 3, 5, b7 would be: c, e, g, a# (b is 7 but it's flat seventh so it's (A#/Bb)
Standard scale used for this is mixolydian (c, d, e, f, g, a#, b) but if you
play leads just play major with little accents on a# to get that

"Cool sounding kind of blues cheerfull sound" you really need to hear it for
yourself.

Examples Mixolydian:

Joe Satriani : Summer Song
John Petrucci : Glassgow Kiss
Frank Gambale: 6.8 Shaker

If you listen to those 2 songs they have that same kinda feel going on. totally different but same kind of bright chill easy going feel. Hard to explain you need to hear the the connection between the 2. (or other mixo song)

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 10, 2006,
#5
Quote by Testament23
thanks.
one more question, what is a dominant chord? is it just a raised 7th? i was under the impression that the 5th degree of a scale is the dominant, do they have anything to do with each other?
help would be much appreciated


You are correct, the 5th degree of the scale is the dominant chord, this is referred to as the dominant 7th or V7 chord. The confusion comes in because in some instances (particularly blues) you may add the b7 to other chords in the progression, yet only the V7 chord functions as the dominant chord.
#6
Quote by shok_411
You are correct, the 5th degree of the scale is the dominant chord, this is referred to as the dominant 7th or V7 chord


thanks for the help.
but im not too sure what you mean here. why is the dominant chord referred to as the "dominant 7th"?
#7
hey guys what it this progression called:
I7 IV7 I7 V7, IV7, I7
what scale would it fit under, it couldnt be normal major scale coz the minor 7 isn't in the scale.. any ideas?
- tommy
#9
Quote by Testament23
thanks for the help.
but im not too sure what you mean here. why is the dominant chord referred to as the "dominant 7th"?


The dominant 7 defines both the function of the chord and the chord itself. Adding a minor 7th interval to the dominant chord (V) produces dissonance that pulls towards the root and a resolution, this is why so many chord progressions have are some kind of V7-I transition on them, causing tension then resolution and this helps to define the key centre. The reason we can get away with describing the dominant chord as the dominant 7 chord is because only one dominant 7 chord exists in any major scale and so if you were to say the dominant 7 of C you would automatically know you're playing a G7. Of course in a chord progression you could add a minor seventh interval to other chords but only the V chord acts the dominant 7. I suppose it's slightly tricky 'music speak' but don't get too bogged down with it because you appear to have a good idea of what is going on.

On your other question; The formula for a minor7 chord is:

1 b3 5 b7

The same as a dominant7 but with a flattened third (a minor third interval is what defines a chord as 'minor').

#10
Quote by tombomb22
hey guys what it this progression called:
I7 IV7 I7 V7, IV7, I7
what scale would it fit under, it couldnt be normal major scale coz the minor 7 isn't in the scale.. any ideas?


Mixolydian is normally the preferred choice for dominant 7th chords.... and your observation is correct - Ionian has the major 7th, but take a look at Mixolydian...


[B]Mixolydian[/B]: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - b7 - 1.
#13
Quote by shok_411
The dominant 7 defines both the function of the chord and the chord itself. Adding a minor 7th interval to the dominant chord (V) produces dissonance that pulls towards the root and a resolution, this is why so many chord progressions have are some kind of V7-I transition on them, causing tension then resolution and this helps to define the key centre. The reason we can get away with describing the dominant chord as the dominant 7 chord is because only one dominant 7 chord exists in any major scale and so if you were to say the dominant 7 of C you would automatically know you're playing a G7. Of course in a chord progression you could add a minor seventh interval to other chords but only the V chord acts the dominant 7. I suppose it's slightly tricky 'music speak' but don't get too bogged down with it because you appear to have a good idea of what is going on.

On your other question; The formula for a minor7 chord is:

1 b3 5 b7

The same as a dominant7 but with a flattened third (a minor third interval is what defines a chord as 'minor').



thanks man, you really know your stuff
#14
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Dominant is for now just as a 7 if used in the context of a seventh chord which has a flat 7 so formula is: 1, 3, 5, b7

so if you have C major: c, d, e, f, g, a, b, back to c equals

C = 1
d = 2
e = 3
f = 4
g = 5
a = 6
b = 7

So 1, 3, 5, b7 would be: c, e, g, a# (b is 7 but it's flat seventh so it's (A#/Bb)
Standard scale used for this is mixolydian (c, d, e, f, g, a#, b) but if you
play leads just play major with little accents on a# to get that

"Cool sounding kind of blues cheerfull sound" you really need to hear it for
yourself.

Examples Mixolydian:

Joe Satriani : Summer Song
John Petrucci : Glassgow Kiss
Frank Gambale: 6.8 Shaker

If you listen to those 2 songs they have that same kinda feel going on. totally different but same kind of bright chill easy going feel. Hard to explain you need to hear the the connection between the 2. (or other mixo song)



Never call it a#. A# is a raised 6th, and if it was written as A#, it wouldn't be called a 7 chord. It would be called a 6th chord, perhaps even rewritten as a 7th chord with the root A#.


THe point is A# & Bb sound the same, but because they are written differently and gotten to differently, use the correct one.


It's a flattened 7th. The 7th is B. Bb is part of C7. A# is never in a C7.
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