#1
Would there be any way to change a few parts on a wireless router to change it into a wireless guitar system? I know I might be crazy, but I have an old router that we're not using, and I thought it'd be neat to have some kind of wireless guitar system.
Gear
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Washburn Acoustic
Jay Turser Bass
Panasonic SX-KC211 Keyboard
BOSS DS-2 Turbo Distortion
BOSS AW-3 Dynamic Wah (Fixed!)
Roland Micro-Cube
Randall RB30XM Bass Amp
Tascam DP-01FX Digital Recorder
#3
I was thinking the other way around, putting 1/4" jacks into the router.
Gear
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Washburn Acoustic
Jay Turser Bass
Panasonic SX-KC211 Keyboard
BOSS DS-2 Turbo Distortion
BOSS AW-3 Dynamic Wah (Fixed!)
Roland Micro-Cube
Randall RB30XM Bass Amp
Tascam DP-01FX Digital Recorder
#4
Routers are set up to send and receive data from a computer's wireless card on a certain frequency. Unless you can get a guitar to transmit that data, then it's not happening.

And I don't see why you would put 1/4" jacks into the router, because then you have cables, and so basically you have an expensive system that does absolutely nothing.

I guess what I'm saying is... what exactly are you trying to do? Do you want to make a router that's a wireless guitar system to eliminate cables? Or are you trying to run a cable from your guitar into a router, then transmit that data wirelessly to something?

I don't get it.
#5
See, all wireless things transmit on a funky frequency, it's not the guitar that makes it. What this guy needs is some way to make a guitar transmitter using an ethernet wireless card or something, that will connect to his router, where a cable will plug into his amp. Basically, he has a wireless receiver, he's wondering if he can make a transmitter to go with it.
#6
It may be possible, but it will be WAY harder than just adding some jacks methinks...the whole setup is made for digital crap...audio waveforms are analogue.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#7
Quote by pratt121
Routers are set up to send and receive data from a computer's wireless card on a certain frequency. Unless you can get a guitar to transmit that data, then it's not happening.

And I don't see why you would put 1/4" jacks into the router, because then you have cables, and so basically you have an expensive system that does absolutely nothing.

I guess what I'm saying is... what exactly are you trying to do? Do you want to make a router that's a wireless guitar system to eliminate cables? Or are you trying to run a cable from your guitar into a router, then transmit that data wirelessly to something?

I don't get it.


well how do you propose that he takes the signal from the wireless box to the amp?
#8
I don't really think it's possible to turn a router into a wireless system. You'd end up stripping down and replacing so many parts of the router until you had only the amplifier and aerial. Wireless systems for computers are modulated in a way that isn't really suitable for analog signals, so you need a new modulator. Since a lot of the stuff you don't need is on a single PCB the thing will be a lot bigger than commercially available wireless systems which can sit next to the jack on your guitar.
A better idea (if you really want a cheap wireless system) would be to buy one of those Ipod radio transmitters. They plug into the headphone jack of an Ipod and transmit the sound through FM, so it can be picked up by a radio tuned to the correct frequency. All you need to do it stick a radio on your amp (a reasonably good one so it sounds good), tune it in and put it into the line in/CD jack on your amp. Depends on where you live though, since the transmitters are banned in some countries. (England at the moment, for example, though they will be legalised soon)
You can use leftover routers for other stuff - I'm sticking a spare one in a homemade pedal board and another in my latest amp. That way I'll be able to put my effects anywhere on stage and not trip over wires, and change settings on both FX and amp from my laptop
Dave
#9
Alright, I think I'll just save up for this and get an actual system later. That pedalboard idea sounds pretty cool, thanks for the help!
Gear
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Washburn Acoustic
Jay Turser Bass
Panasonic SX-KC211 Keyboard
BOSS DS-2 Turbo Distortion
BOSS AW-3 Dynamic Wah (Fixed!)
Roland Micro-Cube
Randall RB30XM Bass Amp
Tascam DP-01FX Digital Recorder
#10
how do you put computer parts into pedal boards a stuff? I mean, do you have to program the router stuff, or is there stuff on your computer? I don't know.
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Takamine G340SC
Epiphone G 310
#11
Quote by Wyld Stallyn
I don't really think it's possible to turn a router into a wireless system. You'd end up stripping down and replacing so many parts of the router until you had only the amplifier and aerial. Wireless systems for computers are modulated in a way that isn't really suitable for analog signals, so you need a new modulator. Since a lot of the stuff you don't need is on a single PCB the thing will be a lot bigger than commercially available wireless systems which can sit next to the jack on your guitar.
A better idea (if you really want a cheap wireless system) would be to buy one of those Ipod radio transmitters. They plug into the headphone jack of an Ipod and transmit the sound through FM, so it can be picked up by a radio tuned to the correct frequency. All you need to do it stick a radio on your amp (a reasonably good one so it sounds good), tune it in and put it into the line in/CD jack on your amp. Depends on where you live though, since the transmitters are banned in some countries. (England at the moment, for example, though they will be legalised soon)
You can use leftover routers for other stuff - I'm sticking a spare one in a homemade pedal board and another in my latest amp. That way I'll be able to put my effects anywhere on stage and not trip over wires, and change settings on both FX and amp from my laptop
Dave


how are you doing that? i'm intrigued by that
#12
You can't normally do it, I just wanted to have a rig I could control from my computer - that way I can select what song I'm playing when live and the effects/channels will change for me. I'm putting a small processor in the pedal and amp that acts like a computer so they can communicate.
You can get MIDI controlled multieffects pedals/heads like the Behringer V-amp (which is either a pedal or rack mounted) or Diezel heads. They can take signals through a MIDI cable from software on your computer that tell them to change channels/effects.
#14
If it works it should be - I was looking to sell this sort of stuff in the future. I've made custom effects pedals / practice amps for people before, but now I'm putting some money into something bigger for myself (a 400W amp). It's going to be varnished exotic wood with finger joints to show off the craftmanship, so hopefully when gigging people will at least ask about it. I don't know whether it's something I want to do as a job though
#15
I think you'd really only need an analog to digital convertor for the transmitter, and a digital to analog convertor in the router itself: remember, Sennheiser has digital wireless things. Personally, I bought a VHF single channel Nady wireless unit for around $24 (store was gonig out of business ), that usually sells for $80-100. Works fine for me. It would be alot of work, but it is feasible.
#16
the converters would only be the start. They turn the guitar's wave into binary, but something needs to turn that into I2C signals that the transmitter takes. You really need a computer to add all the other data that gets sent, things like parity bits and encryption. I think most wireless instrument packs are digital now, because there is less interference but routers work on 2.4Ghz, more than VHF.
$24 is good - is Sennheiser the company that makes those guitar bug things?
#17
i think Samson makes the guitar bug thing. That actually seems alot nicer than a beltpack style design, if you plan on doing guitar spins.
#18
Ah right, thanks - I saw them in a shop a while ago for about £100, and thought if I'm gonna have a wireless effects pedal I really need a wireless guitar. I guess you could do guitar spins if you clipped the transmitter to your strap, but I can't do them anyway, so it doesn't matter!
#19
if you are spinning your guitar, for goodness gracious, tape that transmitter to your strap, ive seen far too many people let their's fly away and break in the middle of the set.
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Takamine G340SC
Epiphone G 310
#20
you know how people make remote controlled full size cars by wiring the circuit of remote controlled toys onto motors which drives the big car? i think if you apply this principle it'll work.

maybe you can cut the internet cable and solder it to a guitar jack?
#22
Don't waste your time. It's like trying to take an old VCR and make it into a TiVo. It's not worht the money.
#23
Quote by take_it_t
Don't waste your time. It's like trying to take an old VCR and make it into a TiVo. It's not worht the money.

Quote by rabidguitarist
I even tried dressing up as a fly myself, and throwing myself out of the window in the hope that they will follow me. But to no avail.

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we have a Llama forum, and still no drum forum.
#26
its probaly impossible,there both wireless but not the same.


You could mabye try and make a wireless mic into a wireless guitar sytem
Quote by Chikitty_China
Well, when I'm fapping, I sometimes look at my left hand and wonder what could have been ....
#27
might just be easier to sell the router to get a bit of cash then just buy a proper wireless system thats guarranteed to work without all the work put in to make it.
#28
yeah, i think he was just seeing if he could do it. Cool idea, i just dont think it would be practical.
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Takamine G340SC
Epiphone G 310