#1
Alright so I haven't been playing bass for as long as I wish I would've started, but I wanted to know about the techniques of the more well rounded players. I myself am extremely dedicated to the instrument and of course theory.

So what do you do to go beyond the root note personally? Like the guitarist is playing a simple C-E-G line, one measure each, what strategy would you use to make an accompanying line?
#2
if you can get the guitar player to play it over and over.(or if possible a recording of the progression) Then the best thing you can do is just mess with it and find something you like or that fits well. You'll eventually find some thing that works and you'll learn what doesn't as well.
#3
Find out what key it is in so that you can have a better understanding of whether the C-E-G root notes are part of major or minor chords. Arpeggiated lines are good to start with. After this, you can go into passing notes that can be in or out of key, chromatics, etc. Basically, just play what sounds good and flows well.
#4
well i play fills that are in line with the specific chords/key, bends, octaves, and try to make cool sounding transitions between the notes. it just depends on the song, eg what mood you want, what you wish to emphasise on it, etc. work out a clever bassline that compliments with the chords of the song, and the drums. try things yourself and make it ur own, thats a great way of learning.
i need to get a better signature.
#5
The real question is, how much theory do you know?

There is no real shortcut to writing and awesome bassline, except imagination and your knowledge of theory. Learn your major and minor scales, and what notes are used for what, then go crazy on it. Practice and time, Practice and time.

It also depends on the style of music. A metal bassline is going to very different from a rap or jazz bassline, even if it is the same chord progression.
#7
Quote by elemenohpee
The real question is, how much theory do you know?

There is no real shortcut to writing and awesome bassline, except imagination and your knowledge of theory. Learn your major and minor scales, and what notes are used for what, then go crazy on it. Practice and time, Practice and time.

It also depends on the style of music. A metal bassline is going to very different from a rap or jazz bassline, even if it is the same chord progression.



+1 to that.
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#8
Quote by musiclover2399

So what do you do to go beyond the root note personally? Like the guitarist is playing a simple C-E-G line, one measure each, what strategy would you use to make an accompanying line?


ok, so there are a few ways you can approach this. lets take the first chord, C Major. This chord consists of the root C, the 3rd E, and the perfect 5th G. So if you play any of those notes over that chord it will sound fine. The 5th will sound nicer than the 3rd, because of the physical relationship it has with the root note. So, when you are writing your basslne, you could invert the chord. So, moving the C to the bottom and playing the E first will give you the "First Inversion" of C Major. You with me still? Just because your chord is C, doesnt mean you have to start on C, or even play the C note.

Personally, when i write a bassline i like it to make it quite linear, instead of having it jumping 5ths all over the place. So take your time.. write out the above chords, then undernearth write the notes that are in that chord, then find the smoothest line from the first chord to the last chord. Here, i will show you this one..


[B]C:::E:::G[/B]
C:::E:::G
E:::G#:::B
G:::B::: D



So, to me the most linear route would be C, B, D. The D will sound gorgeous over the G chord and change the sound of the song.. It'll make it sound smooth..

Of course you could also just play 5ths over al the chords, that will sound good too. You could also start your C major scale from any note over the chord and it will sound right too, as long as it resolves correctly. Dont leave anyone hanging bro!

Any Q's, please feel free to ask
Last edited by Applehead at Aug 11, 2006,
#9
^Ha, that was very helpful to me Applehead as I would imagine it was to the thread starter, these are things I generally would like to learn about as I'm starting to get into theory and improve/expanding basslines etc, but I never end up asking.
#10
Things like this, to me, are the next step in playing bass. If you have developed some fairly decent chops, you need to learn how to use those skills effectively, and learning the theory behind your instrument, and how to play in a band situation with other musicians is the key..

You may think "yeah but how do i know what notes are in the chord"? Practice is the answer. Also, learning to play the piano helps so much. I learnt most of my theory knowledge on the piano and playing piano has helped with my bassism so much. I find it much easier to visualize chords, major and minor, from the aspect of a keyboard and not a guitar/bass. Of course, you know the bass is balanced excellently. So as long as you know the fretboard you can easily get the 3rd or 5th for any note quickly. Try with with a song.. find a song you play that has some fairly basic root note pattern.. then just play the 5th instead. Sound good? I bet it does ! Different, but still right.

As i said, any Q's please ask.
#11
Applehead, thank you times like, 98i7653243176509 lol . Everyone in this thread gave very nice perspectives, of course it looks like I'll use mainly the 2nd inversion thing at first but when I improve some more these other ones will DEFINITELY come in handy, MAN I'm glad I spoke up.