#1
i don't understand exactly how this **** works. the 5th caprice is supposed to be in a minor but uses C#,F# and G#. how can you decide how to add out of scale notes and understand WHY it sounds good. i add out of scale notes all the time but i still have no idea why it sounds good(music thoery wise) could some theory expert please elaborate on this concept?

P.S. i attached the tab if you need it
Attachments:
fifth_caprice.zip
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#2
Well im no theory scientist, I can tell you that most classical composers used arpeggios to bring them from one key to another, and in some songs, like Sonata #1 in G Minor by Bach, you can see that he goes through the entire note vocabulary, hitting upon A, Bb, B, C, C#, D, Eb, E, F, F#, G, and Ab. Thats why this song touches other notes and still sounds good, the arpeggios were made to be used as a smooth transition. Also, scales have a set of notes that make it a scale, but you dont have to stick to this limited number of notes, and there are other positions of the same scale on the fretboard. The notes on the scale can all become chords, and inverted chords, for example a G note could become a G chord, G B and D, and then to transition, you could play an inverted G chord, which could be D G B, as an arpeggio, and then itll drop you off at the B note, and you can move from there... I hope this makes sense..It did while I was typing it but thats how I think, so hopefully you can comprehend.
#3
yeah i think i get it
Quote by rooster456
Guitars will bring girlfriends. Girlfriends won't bring guitars.



Because footstools are cool UG's Classical Guitarists
pm Marmoseti or Confusius to join
#4
Id still like a big theory expert to comment though, to see if I said anything wrong, or what I could have added.
#5
When those notes are added, F# C# G#, the piece modulates to the parallel major, A Major (the original key is A minor). Because the two have a common tonal center, the transition is made smoothly and artfully. As a matter of fact, in this piece there are several modualtions within the song itself, such as C major (the relative major) among others. This is actually a fairly common technique that is employed extensively, expecially in classical music (ex. Mozart's Fantasy in Dm, k. 397, which modulates from Dm to D major)... and, Paganini is bad ass!!! Hopefully this answers your question.

EDIT: Listen to the Solo Violin version, it is incredible, especially the arpeggios/chromatic runs at the beginning and the end (Paganini really was amazing!)
Last edited by uberfag at Aug 11, 2006,