#1
How do you create and incorporate feedback into your playing?
"If my baby don't love me no more,
well I'm sure her sister will." -Jimi "Red House"

Gear
1983 Strat '57 Reissue
1964 Gibson ES-330
Dr Z Maz 38
Fender Pro-Junior


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#2
Turn it up loud, lots of gain, whammy bar, and sometimes position your guitar towards your amp.

Best to use in solos.
top axes:
Taylor GS8
Fender American Strat (w/DiMarzio pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
#3
I find an quick and easy way to do it (besides from extra gain), is to bump the back of the neck of the guitar lightly using the fat part of your palm. (Usually somewhere in the middle befind the 7th fret should do it.) Doing this with distortion gives me that gradual feedback. I am an amateur so take this advice as coming from one, but trust me...you will get feedback.
#5
Can really only be done when your playin live or at a full volume practise.
I vibrato a note and shake the neck so the strings move i find it feedbacks better and i can still control it.
and also face the amp and move closer that works to
Fender P Bass Mex

Guitar Set Up
Fender Strat Mex (Modded)
Toadwords Leo Jr
Vox Wah V847
Electro Harmonix LBP-1
Line 6 FM4
Boss DD-20
TC Electronic Tuner
Orange Tiny Terror(ist)


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#6
Quote by Ljk825
I find an quick and easy way to do it (besides from extra gain), is to bump the back of the neck of the guitar lightly using the fat part of your palm. (Usually somewhere in the middle befind the 7th fret should do it.) Doing this with distortion gives me that gradual feedback. I am an amateur so take this advice as coming from one, but trust me...you will get feedback.



x2 this is true, sometimes, but still works, and if you hold a chord shape at the same time.......
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