#1
is this right ?

The diff modes ...aeolian ....lorian etc are just diff names to the scales ....for example Ionion for the major scale and aeolian for the minor scale
#2
Each degree of the major scale is a possible start for a special scale called a mode. These scales have the same notes as their respective major scales, but start on a different point.

I'll use C major for an example just because it will probably be easier to understand when there are no sharps or flats.

The modes of the major scale are: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian.

In the key of C major:

C Ionian C D E F G A B
D Dorian D E F G A B C
E Phrygian E F G A B C D
F Lydian F G A B C D E
G Mixolydian G A B C D E F
A Aeolian A B C D E F G
B Locrian B C D E F G A

Each mode has a different set of intervals which means that each mode has it's own sound and flavor. Here are the tonalities of the modes.

Ionian=major
Dorian=minor
Phrygian=minor
Lydian=major
Mixolydian=major
Aeolian=minor
Locrian=diminished and minor I think.
#3
They arern't different names for scales, they are THE names of scales. There are 7 total one for each note in an octave. Take the key of C: it con'tains C ionian, D dorian, E phrygian, F lydian, G Mixolydian, A aeolian, and B locrian. Than back to C obviously.

Edit: Hah too late ^ what he said.
#4
i dont really understand modes i just use them without caring about what they are
Quote by jxljxl
Fais wins at life


The obscenely young leader of the Laney Cult


Member of the EHX Guild
#5
^Well... then you're not using them. Just thought I'd throw that out there.
Looking for my India/Django.
#6
If you take the C major scale and start playing with its root note (C), obviously you have the major scale or the first mode (C Ionian); then you start with the D, you have the second mode of the major scale (D Dorian); then you start with E, you have Phrygian mode; starting with F you have the Lydian mode; witg G the myxolidian; with A the Aeolian mode or natural minor; and the last but not least, the Locrian Mode starting with the B.

So, there you are you just grabbed the major scale, and used each of his notes to create a new starting point, having another scale with another sounding.

Undestood?
my guitar will make you cry
#8
Quote by rhcp_freak
i dont really understand modes i just use them without caring about what they are


hmm.. i suggest actually learning what they are. it can help a lot. i'm sure you want to apply the pitch axis theory to all of your musical compositions, you just don't know it yet.
#9
hey guys....thanks a lot ...got it ...but one more doubt ..just lik chords can be built in the major scale C for example ....C F, G becomes the major chords etc....what are the rules for derivin chords for the other modes..i mean ....how do u know which are major and which are minor chords
?
#10
You know which chords are major and which are minor in major scales because they follow this pattern:

Major
Minor
Minor
Major
Major
Minor
Diminished

In that order. So you line them up with the notes in the scale.
#11
So its sort of the same thing as telling the difference between Cmaj and Am, how do you tell which mode is being used?
George W. Bush for President 2012

We can do it if we work together!
#12
Quote by kirbyrocknroll


Ionian=major
Dorian=minor
Phrygian=minor
Lydian=major
Mixolydian=major
Aeolian=minor
Locrian=diminished and minor I think.


When it comes to Major and Minor, it's all about the third. The third of the root is the only note that makes a scale/chord major or minor and it's only a half step difference.

So the major third in a C chord is E
The minor third is D#
#13
Quote by kirbyrocknroll

Locrian=diminished and minor I think.


Its diminished but it can function as minor (minus the diminished 5th)
Been away, am back
#14
Quote by Logz
Its diminished but it can function as minor (minus the diminished 5th)

Ohh...Thanks
#16
May I ask a mode question?

So, I'm playing a song in C major, and I come to the solo. I decide I want a spacey feel to the solo, so pick the lydian mode. Am I then free to widdle with the lydian mode in the key of C, or do I have to play the lydian mode in the key that makes its notes the same as the C major scale?
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
if ur going to play some american idiot stuff heres the settings:

Master Volume : 0
i dunno about the rest
#17
Quote by TeenBite
May I ask a mode question?

So, I'm playing a song in C major, and I come to the solo. I decide I want a spacey feel to the solo, so pick the lydian mode. Am I then free to widdle with the lydian mode in the key of C, or do I have to play the lydian mode in the key that makes its notes the same as the C major scale?


You are free to improvise with the C Lydian mode, because it is in the key of the song (C), but you must mind the song's chord proggression.

Did you get it?

Keep it Funky
my guitar will make you cry
#18
Modes are a different type of scale. The major scale (Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Ti Do) has a distinct step pattern that remains constant regardles of the key. A semitone is the space between one fret (G# to A); a tone is the space between two (G to A, G# to A#). The pattern for the major scale is to play a note, any note, which will be the root, then:
Tone (D), tone (E), semitone (F), tone (G), tone (A), tone (B), semitone (C)

The modes are the same pattern but start in a different spot. For instance, the Mixolydian in the key of C starts on a G note instead of a C, but still uses the same notes as the C major scale. The G note in the above pattern is the first tone after the first semitone (4th word), so the pattern would be: G
tone (A), tone (B), semitone (C), tone (D), tone (E), semitone (F)

Modes can be played in any key so long as the step pattern remains constant. It is not necessarily always G mixolydian or C ionian; only when in the keys of G and C, respectively. In the key of D, the mixolydian scale starts on D, and is named D mixolydian. Start with D, then:
tone (E), tone (F#), semitone (G), tone (A), tone (B), semitone (C)

Hope that isn't too confusing
Last edited by millerdrr at Aug 15, 2006,
#19
i understand modes, but could someone please tell me what sound each mode is meant to give? eg. lydian - spacey?!?
#20

You are free to improvise with the C Lydian mode, because it is in the key of the song (C), but you must mind the song's chord proggression.

Did you get it?

Keep it Funky


That is incorrect. C Lydian is NOT in the key of Cmaj, it's in the key of Gmaj.

Why? Because all the notes in C Lydian are in the Key of G.

C Lydian means the key of G, based on C, C being the tonal centre.

Originally Posted by TeenBite
May I ask a mode question?

So, I'm playing a song in C major, and I come to the solo. I decide I want a spacey feel to the solo, so pick the lydian mode. Am I then free to widdle with the lydian mode in the key of C, or do I have to play the lydian mode in the key that makes its notes the same as the C major scale?


You can use C Lydian, BUT you're then no longer in the key of C but you're now in the key of G. This is a good way to get the sound of modes out.

or do I have to play the lydian mode in the key that makes its notes the same as the C major scale?


You could but then u would get a total Cmaj sound not a Lydian sound, because after all ur song is in, and resolves to Cmaj. So Cmaj is already established as the tonal centre. Therefore, using C Lydian would be way better. keep in mind that if the band carries on playing in the key of Cmaj, then ur solo wont sound to pleasing.

if you dont understand or think i'm wrong i'll be happy to write a better explanation.

cheers
#21
Testament23
Registered User

i understand modes, but could someone please tell me what sound each mode is meant to give? eg. lydian - spacey?!?


ionian-Quality: Happy or Upbeat quality
Musical Styles: Rock, Country, Jazz, Fusion

Dorian-Quality: Jazzy, Sophisticated, Soulful
Musical Styles: Jazz, Fusion, Blues, and Rock

Phrygian-Quality: Spanish Flavor
Musical Styles: Flamenco, Fusion, Speed Metal

Lydian-Quality: Airy
Musical Styles: Jazz, Fusion, Rock, Country

Mixolydian-Quality: Bluesy
Musical Styles: Blues, Country, Rockabilly, and Rock

Aeolian-Quality: Sad, Sorrowful
Musical Styles: Pop, Blues, Rock, Heavy Metal, Country, Fusion

Locrian-Quality: Sinister
Musical Styles: Jazz, Fusion

copied from here http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/lessons/lesson14.htm
#23
Thanks everyone. You've been very helpful.
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
if ur going to play some american idiot stuff heres the settings:

Master Volume : 0
i dunno about the rest
#24


You could but then u would get a total Cmaj sound not a Lydian sound, because after all ur song is in, and resolves to Cmaj. So Cmaj is already established as the tonal centre. Therefore, using C Lydian would be way better. keep in mind that if the band carries on playing in the key of Cmaj, then ur solo wont sound to pleasing.

Could you explain it better, please?

Keep It Funky
my guitar will make you cry
#25
Could you explain it better, please


i think i was pretty clear but what the heck, since i gained quite a bit of info from ugers i might aswell do my part.

a simple progression in the key of Cmaj.

C-F-C-G7-C

this progressoin has established Cmaj as the tonal centre.(if it's not obvious) therefore you could say the song is in C ionian. which means that ur using all the notes in the Cmaj scale with Cmaj as the tonal centre.

simple jazz progression in Cmaj

Dm7-G7-Cmaj7-C6-Dmin7

this progressoin has established Dmin7 as the tonal centre.(if it's not obvious), therefore you could say the song is in D dorian mode. which means that ur using all the notes in the Cmaj scale(key of C), but with D as ur tonal centre.

u can do the above with all other modes.

Now if you take this progression again

C-F-C-G7-C

to say that im gonna solo in f lydian is basically pointless because F lydian implies key of Cmaj with F as tonal centre. so to solo with F lydian over that^ progression would NOT give you a spacey sound. cause the song is in C ionian mode. another guy said one thing about modes that i totaly agree with. he said,

modes are NOT solo devices

and i repeat modes are NOT solo devices i'm chilled

i think the reason why people say they are gonna use F lydian over ^that prog. is just to sound cool or whatever. they really dont no the real purpose of modes.

modes are used to describe(not sure if right word here) the tonality of progressions.

for all the above to make sense, you should know that modes are 'completely' dif. from scale patterns. any scale can be played pretty much anywhere on the fretboard.

some dudes will say things like, "i like to start my solo at like ionian and solo like all the way up the fretboard to like mixolydian dude"

using modes like that^ is pointless.

if i wasnt clear enough then please explain what you dont understand.

peace
#26
Quote by inlovewithmusic
is this right ?

The diff modes ...aeolian ....lorian etc are just diff names to the scales ....for example Ionion for the major scale and aeolian for the minor scale


I don't know too much about modes myself, as I'm still learning. I do know that modes are modifications of the major scale, like a sharp here and a flat here, or an extra note.

these "modifications" give the scale a different mood of sorts. Basically an expansion on the major scale to fit certain "moods" and genres.