#1
Hey all,

I'll admit I am not a gear head, and other then a basic knowledge of amp stats and how they work, I dont know THAT much about amps. I've had one (other then the mini starters everyone get at first) amp that I've used pretty much forever. It's a used Fender M-80. Loud enough for band practices and probably gigs, sounds pretty good clean, and the distortion was alright. Reverb was ok too. However, I have tried out a whole whack of other amps and played on random friend musicians a fair bit too. I play a pretty large variety of styles, so I'd really like something versitile that I can get a large range of sounds from. So basically, I want an excellent clean track, decent distortion, though I use stomp boxes, so it doesn't have to be that great, and good volume (enough for band practices for sure and enough for small-medium sized gigs). Also, I dont want to have to buy another amp until this one breaks, or I have extra cash and just want to, so I want something decent. I've been playing for enough years that its not like I'm new to it and need a good basic amp. So basically, this is what I've figured out so far from just trying random amps at guitar stores:

- I dont particularly like Marshall. They are ok, but I dont find them to be that amazing, unless you perhaps get one of those huge stacks, but I dont know much about those. Also, Marshall jacks their prices.
- Fender seems to work pretty good for me, but they are pretty pricey new.
- Vox can be cool, but doesn't seem all that versitile. Unique sound though.
- I DO NOT want a Line 6. Although I think they are really cool amps, I think the built in effects are next to useless unless you buy the $200 pedal, which I would prefer to spend on the actual amp instead. I have enough stompboxes that I dont need more then built in distortion.

Other then that, I don't know much. If anyone has suggestions of stuff to try out, I'd be grateful. I basically base what I like on sound after playing it, and functionality. Oh, and if somebody could tell me what the difference between tube amps and non-tube amps is, and why some have standby, and what that small sections on top of stacks do, and anything else that could make me more amp savvy, that would be wicked.

Thanks many,
Main Gear:
Cort G-Series 254
Takamine EG345C 12-String
Fender Squier P-Bass

Peavey Classic 50
Laney HCM65B

$75 Junk Drums w/ B8 Hats/Crash/Ride
#2
Solid state = sex with condom
tube = sex without condom

oh yeah, with a tube amp you wont need pedals


tubes just sounds warmer and more alive tone than solid states. Whats your budget?
#3
I must say, if you like the Fender sound... my Hot Rod Deluxe is a great tube amp. 40 watts tube is more than enough for small gigs and sounds great. It seems to be versatile enough for me and gets me a good classic rock sound...
#4
Budget... 500-750?

I've heard the Deluxe's are pretty nice and versatile. I'm not a huge classic rock fan, but I play some.
Main Gear:
Cort G-Series 254
Takamine EG345C 12-String
Fender Squier P-Bass

Peavey Classic 50
Laney HCM65B

$75 Junk Drums w/ B8 Hats/Crash/Ride
#5
small sections on top of stacks are the heads it what u use to control the cabinets the cabinets are though two big boxy amps under the head they can either be standing straight or one could have a slant cab , and standyby on a tube amp is because tubes take a few minutes to warm up when solid states dont
Sex is good
Sex is fine
Doggy Style & 69
Just for fun
Or gettin paid
Everyone likes gettin laid
#6
Thanks for the info. So if you buy a stack, do the cabinets and heads always come together, or do a lot of people switch em up for various controls?
Main Gear:
Cort G-Series 254
Takamine EG345C 12-String
Fender Squier P-Bass

Peavey Classic 50
Laney HCM65B

$75 Junk Drums w/ B8 Hats/Crash/Ride
#8
I'm leaning that way too. I'm not usually big on the huge brands, because I'm stupid like that, but I've had good luck with them.
Main Gear:
Cort G-Series 254
Takamine EG345C 12-String
Fender Squier P-Bass

Peavey Classic 50
Laney HCM65B

$75 Junk Drums w/ B8 Hats/Crash/Ride
#9
You can switch up the heads and cabinets. But you can buy them seperate or together, whateber you like. Also, the difference between tubes and solid state is the electronics. SS amps use transistors and stuff, whereas tube amp use vacuum tubes. Tube amps basically just sound better. One thing to know is that vacuum tubes aren't very durable. They can break real easy, and they have to be brought up to temperature each time you play with the standby switch before you turn it on.
#10
Ok...let's get to some of your questions:

Tube amps use vacuum tubes to create amplification. Solid state amps use silicon diode transistors. At low volumes, there is little difference between them. There is a difference, however, when you turn them up. Long story short, tube amps sound INCREDIBLE cranked up, whereas solid state amps sound shrill and terrible. Also, because of the type of soundwaves produced by tube amps, they tend to be as loud as solid state amps 2-2.5 times higher wattage, so a 40 watt tube amp with 6L6s will be as loud as a 100 watt solid state amp.

Standby switches allow you to "warm up" your tubes which extends their life.

You can buy heads and cabs either by manufacturer or mix and match. It's completely personal preference. The only benefit you get from matching is cosmetic, really.
Hi, I'm Peter
#11
Hm.. thanks a lot. That helps quite a bit. I don't think I'm going to get a stack, because I have both no experience with them, and don't think I need one yet. The tube amp explination helps a lot, and I think I might make a point of getting one now. Other then having to make sure I'm real careful with it, it sounds like the way to go. Are tube amps more expensive, or less? Do they still make new tube amps, or do I have to find something used?

Also, I rented a PA system the other day. Since you people are so helpful, why dont you give me the low down on them. I got a pretty simple system for $24 bucks (canadian!) a month, which was great. It's got two micron 400 elites on it, and a powered mixer with 4 inputs, some basic delay/reverb effects, and all standard inputs. I can buy it for $350, including the mixer, but perhaps I would want to invest in a better mixer? I don't really know too much about them. The speakers are basically $150ish. Any ideas or jsut general explinations of quality would be great.

Thanks many many
Main Gear:
Cort G-Series 254
Takamine EG345C 12-String
Fender Squier P-Bass

Peavey Classic 50
Laney HCM65B

$75 Junk Drums w/ B8 Hats/Crash/Ride
#12
*bump*
Main Gear:
Cort G-Series 254
Takamine EG345C 12-String
Fender Squier P-Bass

Peavey Classic 50
Laney HCM65B

$75 Junk Drums w/ B8 Hats/Crash/Ride
#13
They still make new tube amps, mine was made in 2003. I would definately recommend a 59 bassman if you have the cash too. Amazing cleans, and a very good distortion once you crank up the volume. BTW, I got mine used on Ebay for $750. If you can't afford that much, I would check ebay out for a silverface bassman from the 70's. They typically go for anywhere from 300-500 dollars, and are excellent amps for what you want. Just make sure that the seller has good positive feedback.
Muddy Waters Tele - Signed by the members of Canned Heat
PRS Soapbar SE - Signed by Michael Angelo Batio
H&K Statesman Quad EL-84
Dunlop Wah (modded to JH specs)