#1
I have a quick question about electric guitar signals. I have a humble set-up including a Standard mexi-strat, and a line 6 spider II amp . Today, I was playing on "crunch" distortion with the volume on the guitar turned to 10, and the master volume down low- everything sounded fine. Just experimenting, I turned down the volume on my guitar, and the master volume up. The result was weird. The volume was the same, but I lost alot of my treble. It also sounded incredibly clean with almost no distortion, whereas before it had tons. Now, I understand that when you push a weak signal through a twenty foot chord, you lose treble. But why did I also lose distortion?
#2
distortion is when a signal has too much gain(volume) and starts to clip, when you turn the gain(volume) down, you lose the clipping factor.

when turning down the volume, the signal is bled to the ground as well as some treble.

also the reason why the volume was the same was because in the distortion channel the signal becomes compressed so the volume will not change despite signal volume.
Ibanez -> Peavey -> Eardrums

Apparently I'm on some list of people to listen to..?
#3
long cables will give you lower signals, and when u turn down the pickup volume on a guitar while having distortion on, the sound will become cleaner.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#4
Quote by Funky P
distortion is when a signal has too much gain(volume) and starts to clip, when you turn the gain(volume) down, you lose the clipping factor.

when turning down the volume, the signal is bled to the ground as well as some treble.

also the reason why the volume was the same was because in the distortion channel the signal becomes compressed so the volume will not change despite signal volume.


First of all, gain cannot be directly correlated with volume since they're different. Gain is what happens when you internally take the output signal and send some of it back through the amplification process as if it were input. (please correct me if you know I'm wrong.

Secondly, about the volume being the same, I don't think that has anything to do with it. The volume was the same because although I turned the guitar down, I compensated by turning the master up.

Furthermore, I was mostly curious why the sound was clean when the incoming signal was decreased. Any ideas?
#6
you can use the volume as a gain control. as Funky said, distortion is when the signal over reaches its limits and clips. so if you turn down the volume, less of the signal is going past that breaking point and so is not clipping. this results in less distortion. the master controls the output volume, so having that low or high wont do anything to the gain because the gain is already there. the guitar has the input volume, so it does influence the gain.

fun fact: a lot of guitarists used to just turn down their guitars to get a clean signal, then turn it back up for distortion. there wasnt any such thing as channel switching, so this is the way they went from clean to overdrive mid song.
#7
Quote by jof1029
you can use the volume as a gain control. as Funky said, distortion is when the signal over reaches its limits and clips. so if you turn down the volume, less of the signal is going past that breaking point and so is not clipping. this results in less distortion. the master controls the output volume, so having that low or high wont do anything to the gain because the gain is already there. the guitar has the input volume, so it does influence the gain.

fun fact: a lot of guitarists used to just turn down their guitars to get a clean signal, then turn it back up for distortion. there wasnt any such thing as channel switching, so this is the way they went from clean to overdrive mid song.


But the line II is digital. I thought that would mean that you don't get distortion because analog parts don't over load. The effect should be digital instead, and therefore always present... i would think... is it not?