#2
I actually played one a couple of days ago and was surprised that Tak, who usually makes decent acoustics... let this thing out. It was horrible. It even sounds worse when I plugged it into an acoustic amp.

Maybe I picked up a bad one? The only advice I can give you is to go to any local stores that may carry it and try one for yourself.

#3
They are pretty good guitars. I used to own one and enjoyed playing it. Sounds good plugged or unplugged. I liked the onboard tuner.
#4
Quote by Bill43
I actually played one a couple of days ago and was surprised that Tak, who usually makes decent acoustics... let this thing out. It was horrible. It even sounds worse when I plugged it into an acoustic amp.

Maybe I picked up a bad one? The only advice I can give you is to go to any local stores that may carry it and try one for yourself.



Tak has such a good name for themselves it's hard to think something like this happens. Just goes to show that when we say "go the your local guitarshop and play everyithing you can" there is a real reason for it. In the end you can never trust a name.
Not taking any online orders.
#5
exactly, i have a g series, and its amazing, but you can pick up the same model right next to it and it could play and souund like crap.
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Takamine G340SC
Epiphone G 310
#6
Owned one for several years; sounded good acoustic, but didn't retain the acoustic tone when plugged in. Possibly because my amp is cheap (Peavey Rage 158). It played great, but after several years the capstans were pulling their way out of the head. I imagine whoever has the guitar now is the proud owner of $400 worth of firewood, but you get what you pay for. Takamine is not Martin or Gibson, but considering I babied the guitar, mint condition, not a scratch, and played mostly fingerpicked ballads on it, I thought it was made pretty cheap for the capstans to start to fall out after five years. My Martins and Gibsons are twice as old as I am (pushing 30) and they aren't falling apart.

Edit: To answer below, refer to "The Complete Guitarist" by Richard Chapman. Most people over here in the US would say tuning peg, but I used capstan for clarity. The entire assembly worked fine, but the peg the string is actually wrapped around (capstan) was pulling its way loose from the string tension.
Where I said head I should have said headstock.
Last edited by millerdrr at Aug 15, 2006,
#7
Quote by Bill43
I actually played one a couple of days ago and was surprised that Tak, who usually makes decent acoustics... let this thing out. It was horrible. It even sounds worse when I plugged it into an acoustic amp.

Maybe I picked up a bad one? The only advice I can give you is to go to any local stores that may carry it and try one for yourself.



Nope, their just terrible guitars. My buddy has one, I can't believe he bought that peice. I think the G stand for Gay series.
#8
Quote by millerdrr
It played great, but after several years the capstans were pulling their way out of the head.


What is a capstan and what is the head?
Not taking any online orders.
#10
My guitar playing compadre has a G series...it sounds okay, but for the price he paid for it, both the sound and the quality of manufacturing are poor. He's had it for 2 years now, and he has had to take it to the shop three or four times for stupid ****, like the nut falling off, all sorts of buzzing noises, and a problem with the bridge. Not worth it in my opinon....


EDIT: And when plugged in it loses any good tonal qualities it did have...

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.