#1
Had a lesson yesterday where we touched on powerchords, and I asked my teacher if they were the same as a double stop...he didn't know what a double stop was, had never heard that term before.
Best I can figure, a powerchord is always the root and it's fifth, but a double stop can be any two notes. Does that mean a powerchord is technically a double stop? Or am I way off?
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#3
Double stop BENDS: bends where you are already fretting a note and you bend another note up to that pitch, a rock cliche style of play.

EDIT:

e 12
B 15b (full) - Double Stop Bend    
G
D
A
E

e
B
G (13)  - 14th fret being HARMONISED by the 13th
D  14
A
E
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Last edited by La Qotsa at Aug 14, 2006,
#4
I'm no expert, but yes, a powerchord could be a doublestop, I guess. Moreso if it's the root and the fifth below it (a la Smoke On the Water) than the normal. (IMO)
#5
Hmmm...maybe I am out there...I read about double stops in my theory book when it talked about harmonizing notes. It sai two notes played one after another can be considered harmony, but those two notes played simultaneously is a double stop. Maybe I've got the term wrong...
"He has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original."
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#6
rock guitar for dummies said that a double stop was holding any two notes on the same fret. but i heard recently it means that thing where you play two notes and bend the other note into the same pitch
#7
Just look at my post...please people.
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#8
a double stop is when u play two notes together. im a violinist as well as a guitarist, and a double stop is when u place the bow in such a way that it plays 2 strings instead of 1, but wat you are describing may be something completly different
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#9
Quote by Cobalt Blue
rock guitar for dummies said that a double stop was holding any two notes on the same fret.



^^This is correct
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#10
I think double stop means two notes played at the same time. If you play the root and the fifth together, yeah, its technically a double stop, but if you play a full powerchord ( root, fifth, root), I don't think its a double stop... I don't know for sure, but thats most likely correct.
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#11
Good enough for me. Thanks all!
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#13
It's proabably called a double stop because it's played way higher on the strings and played much differently then a powerchord because it also sounds different.
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#14
For all the nooblets above me who think they know everything...

A double stop is a root note and it's 4th being played at the same time. These are examples of a double stop:


e-------------------
B-------------------
G-------------------
D--5-----7---------
A--5-----7---5-----
E------------5------


Doublestops CAN be considered power chords, but only if you make the second note the root. If the root is on the A string, for example, in this doublestop:


D----5---
A---[5]---
E-------


It's going to be a D4 chord. Because, the root is on the A string, the 5th fret on the A string is D, and you're playing the 4th. Just like a 5th chord/power chord, only a step down on the second note.

However, if you are going to use the second string as the root, as in:


D--[5]--
A---5---
E--------


That's going to be a G5. Because, the D string, 5th fret, is G, and you're playing the A string, 5th fret, D. D is the 5th of G, thus, you have a powerchord.

I call these kinds of 5th chords "octave powerchords" but I don't know the exact name for them.
#15
Perfect! Exactly what I was looking for...guess it's one of those 'sometyimes but not always' things. Thanks!
"He has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original."
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#16
hate to break it to u but none of u have the whole thing. Double-stop is a bass term. It means fretting two notes at once and playing them at once. ANY 2 notes. That's it.
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#17
Quote by tobiasosir
Perfect! Exactly what I was looking for...guess it's one of those 'sometyimes but not always' things. Thanks!


Sure thing, man. Glad I could help.

Quote by mister389
hate to break it to u but none of u have the whole thing. Double-stop is a bass term. It means fretting two notes at once and playing them at once. ANY 2 notes. That's it.


While it could mean "fretting any two notes at the same time" in general, you have to know what you're doing and at least some of the theory behind it. Sometimes you might try to play a doublestop only to realize that the notes aren't even in the same scale. That would be a problem.

As for doublestops being a bass term, how can it be a bass term exclusively if guitarists, mainly blues and metal, use it all the time?
#18
Quote by Mikeoman
I think double stop means two notes played at the same time. If you play the root and the fifth together, yeah, its technically a double stop, but if you play a full powerchord ( root, fifth, root), I don't think its a double stop... I don't know for sure, but thats most likely correct.


Bang on, dude. A full powerchord isn't a double stop, to answer your question.
#20
Wouldn't that be the same as an inverted chord; the same notes, but in a different order? (Like say the fifth, root, root instead of root, fifth, root?) Don't know how that would sound, though....
"He has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original."
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#21
If your teacher doesn't know what a double stop is, you might want to get a different teacher...
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#22
no an inverted powerchord is:

e-------------------
B-------------------
G-------------------
D--5--------------
A--5------------
E------------------

or so i was told
#23
^^Yeah, it kind of threw me that he had never heard of it, he plays lots of metal though so maybe he thought I was taling about powerchords.
He's a great teacher, though, I've learned a lot in the two lessons I've had so far...wish I could afford more than a month's worth...
"He has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original."
--Alice Cooper, on Marilyn Manson.
#24
Double stop was explained to me as the same note on two different strings simultaneously; e.g. playing the B string at the 5th fret (E note) while hitting the the open high E string at the same time, and you can bend the B string E note to get that soaring sound. Hendrix used this type of sound frequently, as I'm sure others did and do.
#25
Double stops are when you play ANY two notes at the same time. It's NOT a bass term exclusively as someone said before. The term is universal for all string instruments and you can even use it for melodic percussion instruments.

ANY two notes. A triple stop is when you play 3 notes at the same time... in the context of rock music, perfect 5ths and 4ths are the most common but they are not the only type of doubles stops.

^_^; I also initially learned guitar from Guitar for Dummies and that's the definition they gave. Dictionary.com agrees with me also, and so does the Wikipedia entry. On top of all that, my classically trained ex-Philharmonic band instructor gave a lesson on this also.

Any arguments?
#26
^^ Not from me. Sounds definitive with source notes. Plus it's an expansive definition, rather than being narrowly defined. Nice job.
#27
Quote by lespaul_rentals
Sure thing, man. Glad I could help.


While it could mean "fretting any two notes at the same time" in general, you have to know what you're doing and at least some of the theory behind it. Sometimes you might try to play a doublestop only to realize that the notes aren't even in the same scale. That would be a problem.

As for doublestops being a bass term, how can it be a bass term exclusively if guitarists, mainly blues and metal, use it all the time?


by definition i am correct, any two notes, even if it sounds bad. I agree that knowing what to do helps. alot.

I never said it was exclusive. The term "double stop" comes from upright bass players. An upright is fretless, so it wasn't called "fretting" on a string. They called it "stopping". If they "stopped" two strings at once, they called it "doublestopping"

brush up on your history before starting an argument
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Last edited by mister389 at Aug 16, 2006,
#28
Powerchord 1 (type of doublestop):
-----7----
-----5----

Powerchord 2 (not a doublestop):
-----7----
-----7----
-----5----

Inverted Powerchord 1 (type of doublstop):
-----5----
-----5----

Inverted Powerchord 2 (not a doublestop):
-----7----
-----5----
-----5----

Doublestop:Any two notes played together on different strings.
#29
A double stop is were you pick the lower tone or string with your pick an higher tone which could be a minor third or a fouth or fifth (which is most commonly used for power chords) with you middle finger. After you play the notes you lay your pick and finger back down on the two strings to mute them. Thats why they call it a double stop. That technique most commonly use chicken pickin techinque for country leads. I can be use for quick muting for power chords for a tight sound.
#30
Quote by cybervision
A double stop is were you pick the lower tone or string with your pick an higher tone which could be a minor third or a fouth or fifth (which is most commonly used for power chords) with you middle finger. After you play the notes you lay your pick and finger back down on the two strings to mute them. Thats why they call it a double stop. That technique most commonly use chicken pickin techinque for country leads. I can be use for quick muting for power chords for a tight sound.


All wrong.
#31
I thought these are opinions not arguments. Your opinion from a clasical aspect, not a rock or country.
#32
Quote by cybervision
I thought these are opinions not arguments. Your opinion from a clasical aspect, not a rock or country.


Nah, my definition was pretty much universal. What you described was hybrid picked stacatto double stops.

...
#33
they have double stops in percussion
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