#1
Im a self-taught so i dont know anythng about music theory , i know a few scales though , Is music theory necessary?
#2
yes.
I've got something in my front pocket for you.
Why don't you reach down in my pocket and see what it is?
Then grab onto it, it's just for you.
Give a little squeeze and say: "How do you do?"
#3
if you want to learn to improvise and write decent songs, yes it is
Now officially has too much gear to list

PM me if you want to know about my recording setup
#4
You don't have to know it, but it helps. Alot of classic rock guitarists know the basics and that's it.

I don't know too much theory. I could never get it to sink in. But after 13 years i' say i'm an ok guitarist without it.
Quote by Dirtydeeds468
People don't like Dave Mustaine because he created something that owned Metallica in just about every single aspect of thrash metal.


it's true
#5
Quote by cerveza
if you want to learn to improvise and write decent songs, yes it is

how long does it take to learn it??????????
#6
yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
#7
I don?t want to steal the thread but is it possible to learn on one?s own or would one be better off with a teacher?
#9
Yes and no.

If you plan on being a professional musician and make good music, then yes. Although as said before, many great guitarists have been able to make good music without it, but I reccomend at least learning the basics to get an idea.
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join
#11
everybody is saying yes and i agree. but i'll give a short explanation to why i think it is important.

without theory you can understand how a song is played. with theory, you can understand why it is played that way.

or at least thats how i see it.
#12
Quote by frigginjerk
depends on your natural abilities, but everyone needs some theory background.

at the very least, you need to know the pentatonic and minor scales, and a few tricks to get around the fretboard faster.

I am not a newbie , I can play decent stuff like the creeping death solo from metallica
#13
Quote by blackhorsemen
I am not a newbie , I can play decent stuff like the creeping death solo from metallica


at no point did i imply that you are a newbie. when i say get around the fretboard, i mean being able to find six or seven different D notes all over the board without thinking about it, etc...
#14
Quote by blackhorsemen
how long does it take to learn it??????????


A lifetime.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
yea, its important. you need it to write your own stuff and also it's good to know the basics of it because you can figure out scale formation easily and you can also figure out what key a song is in and why.
#16
Yes.

As for how long it takes, well, if you learn something new every day, for the rest of your life, you might conquer it.

But thats not the point.

You dont need to know it all to use it. Just use it as you learn it.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#17
No learning music theory isn't necessary.

I recommend learning it though, as you can only benefit.

Learning theory DEFINENTLY doesn't take a lifetime. Kids in college learn theory in a semester or so.
#18
Quote by Erc
No learning music theory isn't necessary.

I recommend learning it though, as you can only benefit.

Learning theory DEFINENTLY doesn't take a lifetime. Kids in college learn theory in a semester or so.


What are you talking about?

You're talking like there's a certain finite number of theory to be learnt... You can't even learn all the theory there is in a lifetime, let alone kids in college in a semester. "Theory" doesn't only mean basics you know

And it's definitely
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#20
Quote by blackhorsemen
how long does it take to learn it??????????

Gotta understand what theory is and then you'll realize that question doesn't even make sense.

Theory is the science behind music. Asking how long it takes to learn theory is like asking how long it takes to learn physics. You can't really answer that.. because like Resiliance said .. to learn everything there possibly is to know would take more than a single lifetime.

People who study theory don't stop unless they either lose interest, give up on music or feel that they've learned "enough" (which would be losing interest I guess). But NO ONE ever reaches a point where they say "I've learned all there is to know".

Every time you learn a song .. or learn a note on your fretboard, or write a song .. or play a single note or do anything you're "learning theory"... because theory is music. Plain and simple.

Theory doesn't specifically refer to scales, or to sheet music, or to chords .. it refers to music itself.

Theory is the process of breaking things down and trying to understand music. Everything there is to know about music.

Whether or not studying theory is "necessary" depends on you. Do you want to be the type of musician who picks up his guitar and messes around every now and again and can pump out a few chords or do you want to know how things work and why they work the way that they do etc.

Will studying theory make you a better musician ? Absolutely. It is necessary ? No one can answer that but you.
Last edited by garett at Aug 15, 2006,
#21
You're talking like there's a certain finite number of theory to be learnt... You can't even learn all the theory there is in a lifetime, let alone kids in college in a semester. "Theory" doesn't only mean basics you know



When I use the term "music theory" I refer to the process of "understanding" music and utilizing the skills necessary to do so. It does not take a lifetime to develop the skills necessary to analyze and understand a piece of music, which is what I'm referring to.

I don't begin to think of music theory in actual theories until its narrowed down genre wise like "classical theory" or "jazz theory" and so on and so forth which (for the most part) are ever increasing.
#22
you can never learn everything there is to know about theory, just like you can't master every technique on the guitar - however, you can learn all the theory you need for whatever it is you're looking to achieve...you can learn enough to analyze pieces of music, name any chord simply by looking at the notes, or just knowing why what you're playing sounds good

so it all depends on you and what your goals are, like garett stated earlier
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by Sharp_as_steel
Axe_grinder pwns!!!!



Member #2 of the "Official UG Teabaggers' Cult". PM Slayer224 to join.
#23
If you want to do more to than just play chords/powerchords, than theory is very neccesary

People needn't think that it is such a chore though- every timem I learn something new I apply it to my playing and I have alot of fun improvising around with it and stuff.
#24
I responded to a post like this awhile back and my answer to it has been touched on in this post as well..

To put things in perspective; every bit of music that is played has theory behind it, knowingly or not. Whether you pick up the guitar and play 10 hours of jazz fusion or 10 seconds of hitting random notes, both have underlying theory that makes them sound either pleasing or unpleasing to the ear.

I'm not going to tell people they MUST learn AS MUCH theory as they possibly can be good musicians. But the fact is this, if you play ANYTHING, you're utilizing theory. To many people, it would seem like the next logical step is to learn what makes music work, why good sounding music sounds good, etc..it's ok if you are apprehensive about learning theory. We all have our reasons for everything, but at least consider learning it. I was apprehensive at first as well and since I began taking it seriously, it has opened so many more doors for me and I find it EXTREMELY interesting.

So in short, there is no escaping whether or not theory is being used. How much of the inner workings of it you wish to learn is entirely up to you. Either way, enjoy what you do..
#25
Yeah, Theory doesn't hinder creativity- it just opens doors for you to express your creativity in different ways.
#26
Quote by frigginjerk
depends on your natural abilities, but everyone needs some theory background.

at the very least, you need to know the pentatonic and minor scales, and a few tricks to get around the fretboard faster.


No such thing as natural abilities.
#27
I've only started going to the MT forum this year, and I already think we need a sticky thread for this question.

Is theory necessary? Well, you can't just make music that's made up of random notes and expect people to like it. Sometimes people have a natural ear for what sounds good, but unless you're like Hendrix, you'll need some understanding of theory to be able to do this.

Also, don't let people tell you that learning theory will get in the way of your natural playing. If it is getting in the way, you're not using it properly.
#28
Quote by Resiliance
What are you talking about?

You're talking like there's a certain finite number of theory to be learnt... You can't even learn all the theory there is in a lifetime, let alone kids in college in a semester. "Theory" doesn't only mean basics you know

And it's definitely


i know, i think, i know enough theory onmy own. i took the time and found some stuff on the internet to learn it and took the time to learn shaped notes but that is nowhere near how much there is to know. theres a million scales and chords and everything u can **** around with. so collage kids difinetly cant learn it in a semester or so
thats right.....im available


green day won best band of the year...next thing you know theyll start telling us barneys actually a shade of blue
#29
and dont start saying **** that hendrix dindt know anything. as soon as u can hear notes u can do whatever the hell u want so hendrix isnt exactly in a league of his own where he write **** no one else could ever think of. and i am a hendrix warshipper so dont start saying ****
thats right.....im available


green day won best band of the year...next thing you know theyll start telling us barneys actually a shade of blue
#30
i took the time and found some stuff on the internet to learn it and took the time to learn shaped notes but that is nowhere near how much there is to know. theres a million scales and chords and everything u can **** around with. so collage kids difinetly cant learn it in a semester or so


You misunderstand resi. Just like music, music "theory" is always changing. When he is referring to "theories" hes reffering to things such as "coltranes," "sequenced bitonality," "tritone subsitution," "traditional counterpoint," and the actual "rules" or "guidelines" (I use the term very loosely) that are used to achieve a certain desireable sound or affect.
#31
Quote by dash_right
and dont start saying **** that hendrix dindt know anything. as soon as u can hear notes u can do whatever the hell u want so hendrix isnt exactly in a league of his own where he write **** no one else could ever think of. and i am a hendrix warshipper so dont start saying ****


Hendrix didn't know music theory. He was one of those very few who could just feel the music and could hit the right notes (he goes right through pentatonic and blues scales in alot of his songs, whether he knew it or not) without lots of theory knowladge.

Think of how good he would have been had he learned theory
#32
It'll help, but you do NOT need it to write decent songs, check Mikael from Opeth- he knows not a word of music theory or many chord names even. That isn't to say it isn't necessary, it will help. But the saying 'knowledge = restrictions' seems to fit here.
#33
Quote by Ablazean
No such thing as natural abilities.


Um, what?

Well, nobody has the muscle memory of the fretboard infused in them as a young child, but certainly some people are more naturally inclined to make music than others, just as with mathematics, athletisism, and a plethora of other things. I believe frigginjerk was referring to the ability to recognize harmonies, melodies, and rhythms quickly without knowing the technicalities behind them. Some people are better than others. I'm sure the man you have in your picture was born with quite a bit .


Slurgi

Edit: Oh and my answer to the original question is that it is difinitely a good idea.
#34
Yes.

It'll help you figure out what sounds good and why it sounds good. So you don't have to fiddle around until you find something that fits into a song, or a solo, etc.

No.

It's not mandatory, but you can get by without it. You'd have to follow your ear.
#35
Music Theory is only Essential to those who
1)Desire to be a professional Musician
2)Want to teach music
3)who play their instrument all the time.

of course, you will never, ever learn everything about music, but being able to to tie notes into a chord, and knowing the positions of notes on a instrument, its an awesome thing.

NEVER
believe the lies that music theory isn't important, or that its hard. If you feel like it is what you want to do, being a musician, than by God, learn what you can.

I myself have recently started learning about 3 months ago, and its amazing how much i've improved, not just as a guitarist, but as a musician. It is actually coming together.

Do not make it seem hard, music theory is actually an easy concept, and as i said before, if you are going to play music, you might as well learn the fundamentals.

There is a difference between playing music, and learning music.
#36
Quote by kevinmcelroyhcm
Music Theory is only Essential to those who
1)Desire to be a professional Musician
2)Want to teach music
3)who play their instrument all the time.

of course, you will never, ever learn everything about music, but being able to to tie notes into a chord, and knowing the positions of notes on a instrument, its an awesome thing.

NEVER
believe the lies that music theory isn't important, or that its hard. If you feel like it is what you want to do, being a musician, than by God, learn what you can.

I myself have recently started learning about 3 months ago, and its amazing how much i've improved, not just as a guitarist, but as a musician. It is actually coming together.

Do not make it seem hard, music theory is actually an easy concept, and as i said before, if you are going to play music, you might as well learn the fundamentals.

There is a difference between playing music, and learning music.



This thread was over two years old. Let it rest.

*reported*