#1
I know that in some blues songs, the guitarist uses both major and minor pentatonic licks, so you can play (for example) In both B major and B minor. How does this work?

Surely you can't use both in the same bar of music, cos this only leaves about 2 notes out of 12 in the octave that are not in either scales, and it would be difficult to hit a bum note. Can anyone explain?

Also, in many blues songs the lead guitarist plays in the blues scale, (say B blues scale), which is a minor scale right? So the song would be in B minor, but the bass guitar plays something like:
e|-----------------|
B|-----------------|
G|-----------------|
D|-------6-7-6-----|
A|---6-9-------9-6-|
E|-7---------------|

That bass line is in a major scale (Mixolydian i belive?) but yet it fits with the minor lead guitar? How come?
#2
The sound of the bluies is pretty much based on the clash of the minor melody over the major backing.

It is dissonant, and if you palyed ti to back he would probably cover his ears and shriek.
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#3
Quote by meh!
It is dissonant, and if you palyed ti to back he would probably cover his ears and shriek.

Come again?
#5
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#6
Haha, ****, yeah sorry. Didn't notice that: Bach.
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