#1
I know that in some blues songs, the guitarist uses both major and minor pentatonic licks, so you can play (for example) In both B major and B minor. How does this work?

Surely you can't use both in the same bar of music, cos this only leaves about 2 notes out of 12 in the octave that are not in either scales, and it would be difficult to hit a bum note. Can anyone explain?

Also, in many blues songs the lead guitarist plays in the blues scale, (say B blues scale), which is a minor scale right? So the song would be in B minor, but the bass guitar plays something like:
e|-----------------|
B|-----------------|
G|-----------------|
D|-------6-7-6-----|
A|---6-9-------9-6-|
E|-7---------------|

That bass line is in a major scale (Mixolydian i belive?) but yet it fits with the minor lead guitar? How come?
#2
rules were made to be broken man. and the major-minor thing, if you play in B-major, correct me if i'm wrong, D-minor should be it's relative minor.
the lesser known of the 4
#3
Dminor is NOT Bmajor's relative minor...

Bmajor = G#minor
Bminor = Dmajor



As for the major minor thing... like horseman said, the rules are indeed broken. Given that the true harmony of a 12-bar blues song is a dominant chord (unless otherwsie stated), you can play loads of stuff. The basic way to play would be the Bminor pentatonic (you can use the full Bminor scale, but it sounds a bit too sad), add in a b5 to that scale and you get the blues scale. Mix in some major thirds and seconds and you've got loads of options.


red
Looking for my India/Django.
#4
hmm i do it all by experimenting and u should too man. start trippin out on theory too much and blues playing goes out the window. next thing ur picking up a vinnie moore cd trying to learn morning star
thats right.....im available


green day won best band of the year...next thing you know theyll start telling us barneys actually a shade of blue
#5
Thanks for your help guys but I'm lost here...
Quote by redwing_suck
...the true harmony of a 12-bar blues song is a dominant chord...

Uhhh... explain please redwing?
#6
Dminor is NOT Bmajor's relative minor...

Bmajor = G#minor
Bminor = Dmajor



thanks, i thought it was backwards, but i couldn't quite remember.
the lesser known of the 4
#7
Quote by redwing_suck
As for the major minor thing... like horseman said, the rules are indeed broken. Given that the true harmony of a 12-bar blues song is a dominant chord (unless otherwsie stated), you can play loads of stuff. The basic way to play would be the Bminor pentatonic (you can use the full Bminor scale, but it sounds a bit too sad), add in a b5 to that scale and you get the blues scale. Mix in some major thirds and seconds and you've got loads of options.
Don't forget 6th!