#1
OK could some pleeeaase explain to me what the hell these are?? i know acciaccatura's have no time value and should be played as quickly as possible but so u know theyre are still there but what is an appoggiatura??? man those things are bitches to spell. and where would u use an appoggiatura?

and if its not too much could someone tell me how to pronounce them or an easier way to say them...
thats right.....im available


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#2
An appogiatura is a prepared dissonance. Ususally itis in the form of a chord tone held over to the next chord change, as the harmony changes, the held tone remains, and then resolves to the tone the normally would have occured had normal voice leading procedures been in place during the harmonic movement. The held tone leans into the tone in the new chord.
#3
Quote by dash_right
OK could some pleeeaase explain to me what the hell these are?? i know acciaccatura's have no time value and should be played as quickly as possible but so u know theyre are still there but what is an appoggiatura??? man those things are bitches to spell. and where would u use an appoggiatura? and if its not too much could someone tell me how to pronounce them or an easier way to say them...
These definitions appear in the Harvard Dictionary of Music:

Accaciatura (ah-kot-chee-ah-TUR-a) - an ornament that calls for the playing, together with the primary note, of a neighboring tone (usually the lower second), which is to be released immediately "as if the key were hot".

Appoggiatura (ah-poj-ee-ah-TUR-a) - an ornamental note, usually the lower second, melodically connected with the main note that follows it. The appoggiatura is to be slurred to the primary note.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
Last edited by gpb0216 at Aug 16, 2006,
#5
Quote by spaivxx
It surprises me that the Harvard Dictionary of Music would have such an incomplete definition. For more info on the topic, see Walter Pistons "Harmony". You will find much more info there than I think you will need.....
The HDM does indeed go much deeper than what you read in my post. It seemed to me, however, neither appropriate nor necessary to quote two very long passages to answer general questions about what these ornaments are and how to pronounce their names.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
Last edited by gpb0216 at Aug 16, 2006,
#6
I agree with the Havard definition - that's what I'm taught about them. As for use, along with everything else in music - the rules can be bent so it's more about subjective taste and what you want to achieve effect-wise.
#7
wow how confusing is this
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green day won best band of the year...next thing you know theyll start telling us barneys actually a shade of blue
#8
Quote by dash_right
wow how confusing is this
These are two of the more straightforward ornaments, friend.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#9
I admit I go into too much detail much of the time, the new generation of players, such as 90% of the guys I meet on these forums, tend to barely glimpse the surface of a subject, I only aim to clarify. It's too easy for people to check some online source and get a half assed idea about a musical concept. the definition you guys are accepting for appogiatura, well, is just not indicative at all of the true nature of the term. True, in some vague sense it is accurate, but, if one is going to be so vague, then why bother even defining it at all?

Anyhow, I am not trying to be nit picky...... I am just a music nerd.
#10
Quote by spaivxx
An appogiatura is a prepared dissonance. Ususally itis in the form of a chord tone held over to the next chord change, as the harmony changes, the held tone remains, and then resolves to the tone the normally would have occured had normal voice leading procedures been in place during the harmonic movement. The held tone leans into the tone in the new chord.

WHAT THE ****?

No. That would be a suspension. A melodic appoggiatura is an outside leap on the strong part of a beat.

An ornamental appoggiatura is, almost, exactly how gpb described it. I say almost, because the appogiatura (and accaciatura, btw, in Italian, properly: "a-cha-ka-toor-ah", the doubled C is almost always a hard "ch"... so I have to disagree with HDM's pronunciation there) both have performance decrees depending on what music is actually being played, and the instrument. ie. a jazz accaciatura is usually played "crushed" with the primary note, and as short as possible; as where some composers would have intended for it to be played before the beat, and some on the beat as an appoggiatura with a harder resolution. The appogiatura is almost always played on the beat, and simply takes time from the primary note -- how much depending on the types of notes involved, and whether or not a rest follows them.

I'm sure the lengthy description that gpb doesn't want to quote explains that exactly in a lot of depth. In this context, he's absolutely right. And in the melodic context, you're absolutely wrong -- it would be nice if our resident music "nerds" wouldn't confuse the rather simple suspension with an appoggiatura
Quote by les_kris
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#11
An appogiatura is actually just a suspension which occurs on a weak beat. The terms were at one time interchangeable. Typically the appogiatura is anticipated in the beat preceding it's excution, this is the preparation.

A suspension may be thought of as aan appogiatura which occurs on a strong beat. The difference was most important to theorists studying 18th century counterpoint, in which suspensions were allowed but appogiaturas were not.
#12
^ That's simply wrong.

A suspension is a retained note. An appoggiatura is always lept to. The approach is completely different, and the latter requires no preparation. A suspension always resolves downward (the inverse is a retardation). An appoggiatura resolves in opposite direction of it's leap. A suspension is a three part dissonance, containing a preparation -- a harmonic tone of the initial chord -- the suspension -- a non-harmonic tone in the second chord that happens on the strong part of the beat -- and its resolution, a harmonic tone one step below the suspension, on the weak part. An appoggiatura is always a two part dissonance, involving a leap to a non-harmonic tone that occurs on the strong beat, and its resolution in opposite direction by step.

The striking difference is that an appoggiatura requires 1) no preparation 2) a leap, instead of a retained note. The difference is also quite clearly audible, the appoggiatura is much stronger.

They are completely different non-harmonic tones, they and they should not be confused.
Quote by les_kris
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I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

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#13
not 100% sure that i'm right, but i think here's a tab of an appoggiatura, maybe it'll help:

 D       G
 / . . . / . . . 
-2-------5-3----
-3-------3-3----
-2-------4-4----
-4-------5-5----
-5--------------
---------3-3----


the F# in the D chord leaps to a non-chord tone, the A over the G on the downbeat. it then returns in the opposite direction to the chord tone G.

question of my own, does it have to return by step to be an appoggiatura?
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