#1
Whenever a post about the truss rod is made here, the only response given is "If you don't know how to do it, take it to a tech"

Well, how about some information on correctly adjusting the truss rod, so our only option is not just "take it to a tech"
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#3
Yeah...it's annoying. Unless you're a fool and just jump into adjusting it without reading first (or you think it controls the action) , it's very hard to screw adjusting the rod up.

Originally posted by rich_sg:

Why does your dad have an iPod? Old people aren't cool enough to own them


#4
Can i have some advice?

I've adjusted my truss rod a few times (loosened) to try and get rid of the buzzing i get playing anywhere from fret 5 to 15 or so (and enable me to have a lower action). This occurs on strings 6 and 5, occasionally 4. I can raise my action which is already quite high but that doesn't seem the correct solution. The neck seems flat so i want to put some up bow in it (more relief) to stop the buzzing, but so far loosening the truss rod doesn't seem to have made the slightest bit of difference. My guitar is an ESP Viper 2005. Should a slight anti-clockwise turn make a noticeable difference to the shape of the neck? How can i check if it has made a difference? And is loosing the correct thing to do to solve the buzzing?

Thanks.
#5
Slight turns can make a considerable difference, but if the action is high and you've been giving the rod a fair bit of relief then maybe the neck tension isn't the problem. It could the frets which are the problem.

Originally posted by rich_sg:

Why does your dad have an iPod? Old people aren't cool enough to own them


#6
But i can't tell if im altering the relief, the neck looks as flat as ever :S
#7
The buzzing is occuring at the fret above where i fret (so if i fret at the 12th fret the string coming into contact with the 13th fret). Does this not mean that i need to tighten the truss rod to give a back bow so that the higher frets will be further from the strings?
#8
You only tighten or loosen the truss rod if your neck relief is not proper. Other than that, it'll probably be caused by action.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#10
Check the neck relief then, see if its proper, then only adjust your truss rod according to it.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#11
I've measured, and there was just under 1 mm relief (measured from the top of the 7th fret to the bottom of the low E string, although my frets and neck curve upwards in the center of the neck if you know what i mean, not sure if that makes a difference). So say 0.8 millimeters = 0.031496063 inches (thanks Google) is that too much?

The action currently is about 2mm (0.0787401575 inches).
#12
1mm is a bit high, your neck relief should be at least 0.3-0.5mm above the 8th fretwire between it and the string. And your action is 2mm above what? 12th fretwire?
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#13
Yeah above 12th fret. I thought that was a high action. So your saying i need to tighten the truss rod?
#14
Yeah, do it slowly and let rest between 1/8th or 1/4th of a turn.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#15
How can i check it is actually making a difference, should the neck actually begin to look bent like those diagrams or do i just measure the relief?
#16
Measure the neck relief again until its proper. Hell, you cant tell if the neck's bending just .1 mm can ya? Just remember to do it with your strings in tune to counteract the truss rod's tension.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#18
Quote by toptone78
Can i have some advice?

I've adjusted my truss rod a few times (loosened) to try and get rid of the buzzing i get playing anywhere from fret 5 to 15 or so (and enable me to have a lower action). This occurs on strings 6 and 5, occasionally 4. I can raise my action which is already quite high but that doesn't seem the correct solution. The neck seems flat so i want to put some up bow in it (more relief) to stop the buzzing, but so far loosening the truss rod doesn't seem to have made the slightest bit of difference. My guitar is an ESP Viper 2005. Should a slight anti-clockwise turn make a noticeable difference to the shape of the neck? How can i check if it has made a difference? And is loosing the correct thing to do to solve the buzzing?

Thanks.


is your action really high or are you using it as an excuse for some hard times playing? My experience with high end ESP LTD's is that the action is set up really well from the factory.

If you want to adjust the action of an ltd use the screws in the bridge to lower the bridge! that'll actually adjust the action and from then on make truss adjustments to compensate for the new action so as to eliminate fret buzz.

I used to think my action was high just because i was having a hard time with a couple of solo's but low and behold i played on a heap of other guitars and realised that my action was fruking low! and i have a f-2005
Marty
#19
Yeah i've done that abit after adjusting the truss, i think 2 mm is quite a high action, i used to have it lower but have lost that now i've played with the truss rod :S
#20
Quote by toptone78
I had been doing but i also read that you should loosen the strings :S

Actually, if you loosen the string, its more prone for your neck to break in the inside, coz there's no tension counteracting the truss rod when you're adjusting it. If you tune it to pitch, you would know that when you've adjust it, the notes will go either flat or sharp, and when the wood have rest for awhile, then you tune it back to perfect pitch.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#21
Unlike most people here, I employ the caveman-retarded method of truss rod adjustment. Here are my steps:


1. Tim plays guitar. He notices the action is a little odd.

2. Tim adjusts action by means of saddle height. No matter what, the actions stays high. Tim get's pissed off.

3. Tim picks up guitar and holds it like a rifle - looking down the side of the neck to check for the necessity of a possible truss rod adjustment.

4. Tim finds the truss rod could use a little tightening. He loosens the strings and tightens the truss rod a quarter turn.

5. Tim retightens and retunes strings. Tim then plays guitar. Action is still stupid.

6. Tim loosens strings and tightens truss rod by another quarter turn.

7. Tim retightens and retunes strings. Tim then plays guitar. Action is still stupid.

8. Tim repeats steps 6 and 7 three more times.

9. Tim plays guitar and finally realizes that the action is pretty good - no frett buzz, comfy height.

10. Truss rod adjustment is complete.


That's pretty much the way I do it. I don't measure anything. I just adjust by look and feel. Though this may be a stupid and dangerous method, it works for me. It may work for you, too.