#1
Is sweeping with a metronome better than sweeping without one? I keep trying it and its wierd because its hard to keep track of the first note in a 4 note/beat pattern.

Any other tips?
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#2
Yes, it teaches you your to play sweeps in time without slipping up......... Dont worry about doing it fast at first, even if your only doing 16ths at 60bpm, you have to focus on accuracy, not speed otherwise it will sound ****
#3
I used a metronome when I first started sweep picking.

But don't listen to me, I play blues.

Going to Columbia University this fall! Woohoo!
Member of UGPSA: Ultimate-Guitar's Potsmokers Association
#4
Quote by mEtAlORc
Is sweeping with a metronome better than sweeping without one? I keep trying it and its wierd because its hard to keep track of the first note in a 4 note/beat pattern.

Any other tips?

Well, I prefer to use a pick, but it's your choice.

Sorry, I couldn't resist.
Quote by Mascot
yuR a fAggit
#5
You have to practice it slowly first. You have to. It's the foundation of building up the pre-determined point where it turns into fast and the speed you want to play it at. A good sweep is an time sweep an in time sweep is a controlled sweep.

Control, and eventual mastery of the outer stresses generated by the motions of fast playing are only attained and maintained from its opposite, a position of inner stillness called awareness.

You have to be aware of what you're doing - your fingers, your mind, your timing and so forth - when it all comes together and your patience pays off, you have a feeling of inner pride unrivalled by anything.

That feeling supersedes any comfort you might get from saying 'Oh, I gave up because it felt weird' - The answer to your question is yes.
#6
Quote by Johnljones7443
You have to practice it slowly first. You have to. It's the foundation of building up the pre-determined point where it turns into fast and the speed you want to play it at. A good sweep is an time sweep an in time sweep is a controlled sweep.

Control, and eventual mastery of the outer stresses generated by the motions of fast playing are only attained and maintained from its opposite, a position of inner stillness called awareness.

You have to be aware of what you're doing - your fingers, your mind, your timing and so forth - when it all comes together and your patience pays off, you have a feeling of inner pride unrivalled by anything.

That feeling supersedes any comfort you might get from saying 'Oh, I gave up because it felt weird' - The answer to your question is yes.

that is definitely smartest piece of bull**** answer I have ever read on this site. You could have said the same thing in two sentences, and for that, I applaud you... with you beer.

edit: just to stay on topic, if you understood any of that, he's right.
Going to Columbia University this fall! Woohoo!
Member of UGPSA: Ultimate-Guitar's Potsmokers Association
Last edited by wmzbomgzors at Aug 16, 2006,
#7
Quote by sheumack111
Yes, it teaches you your to play sweeps in time without slipping up......... Dont worry about doing it fast at first, even if your only doing 16ths at 60bpm, you have to focus on accuracy, not speed otherwise it will sound ****


im doing 16ths at 40 bpm. lol and 16ths are when you play 4 notes per beat right?
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#9
and how long is a good amount of time to stay at a certain speed. I have 2 weeks of empty time before school starts. So I'm thinking like every half hour switch the speed back and forth from 40 to 60 bpm? Then the next hour go to like 60 to 80 bpm? Stuff like this?
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#10
Quote by Johnljones7443
You have to practice it slowly first. You have to. It's the foundation of building up the pre-determined point where it turns into fast and the speed you want to play it at. A good sweep is an time sweep an in time sweep is a controlled sweep.

Control, and eventual mastery of the outer stresses generated by the motions of fast playing are only attained and maintained from its opposite, a position of inner stillness called awareness.

You have to be aware of what you're doing - your fingers, your mind, your timing and so forth - when it all comes together and your patience pays off, you have a feeling of inner pride unrivalled by anything.

That feeling supersedes any comfort you might get from saying 'Oh, I gave up because it felt weird' - The answer to your question is yes.



Excellent post.
#11
Quote by mEtAlORc
and how long is a good amount of time to stay at a certain speed. I have 2 weeks of empty time before school starts. So I'm thinking like every half hour switch the speed back and forth from 40 to 60 bpm? Then the next hour go to like 60 to 80 bpm? Stuff like this?


I can't give you any exact hours or minutes, or even the speed to play it at. That's personal.

However what I can tell you is that slow practice, properly done, prepares the foundation which will be strong enough, and secure enough, to withstand the stresses generated in fast playing. Without that foundation, fast playing will always be weak, and will at some point collapse.

You must have both slow and fast practice, and they must be done in a certain way, with a certain gradual progression.

That's why fast practice is equally important. If you're after more information on a specific practice routine I highly recommend you read this thread paying close attention to posts from Casualty01, gpb0216 and Corwinoid.

This won't do you any harm, either.

Quote by MySweetFracture
Excellent post.


Thank you...