#1
Alright, I sing in a band, we've been doing this for a few months and are about to start playing gigs and such. I think we have a decent setlist right now for a fairly short amount of time. One thing we are trying to work on, though, is getting a bigger guitar sound. I've heard that if the 2 guitarists play in 3rds and 5ths you can acheive this, but I'm looking for other tips as well. Thanks.
#2
You can have your drummer accent more energetically, or have him spice up his playing (ie. don't just stick to a simple bass-snare rhythm. Add some cowbell maybe).

It'd help if you told me what genre you guys are playing though.
Every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you
#4
We're a metalcore/experimental band...Tempo changes, short ambient bits thrown in, whatever. Our drummer is very good, there is nothing simple about anything he plays...Which does add. Just wondered what we could do to make the two guitarists mesh real well for a 'bigger' sound if you know what I mean. Without relying too heavily on Delay or Reverb.
#5
Humbuckers for both guitarists.

One of the guitarists playing with his neck pup, the other with his bridge pickup.
Every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you
#6
harmonizing works well, too along with the guitar players using different pickups.

I also think it's neat when one player has a more tinny tone, with the other a bassier tone, to add a little variety and so the guitars dont sound exactly the same.
#7
Overdrive pedals. Gives them a bit of UMPH!
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#10
Don't scoop your mids.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
heavy guage strings add a bigger fuller tone to the guitar. they are harder to solo on though. so what im doing now is taking the 3 low strings from a heavy set (.12's) and then i take the higher strings from an .11 set so i can solo easier and i can have the big fullness in the bass strings. i also use the neck pick up and or the neck/middle combo and that seems to add to the fullness and "bigness" of the sound. maybe also try putting the guitar through bass amps.
#13
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
heavy guage strings add a bigger fuller tone to the guitar. they are harder to solo on though. so what im doing now is taking the 3 low strings from a heavy set (.12's) and then i take the higher strings from an .11 set so i can solo easier and i can have the big fullness in the bass strings. i also use the neck pick up and or the neck/middle combo and that seems to add to the fullness and "bigness" of the sound. maybe also try putting the guitar through bass amps.


You can buy a set GHS boomer strings or a Zakk Wylde set and get the same string gauges.

It'll save you the trouble of mixing and matching string packs.
Every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you
#14
well, something I've been learning recently in recording, is that the best way to get a bigger, yet less muddied sound is to really seperate out everyone's frequency range. I was noticing how much less defined a kick drum sounds in modern music compared to older, classic rock recordings, and I realized that this is in large part due to the fact that bassists in modern recordings generally have a lot more bass and subbass to their tone, which competes with the kick drum. But, in a recording, if you find the main kick drum frequency, take it out of the bass track, and then take the main bass frequency out of the kick drum track, suddenly they both stand out a lot better and everything sounds much less muddy.

This all applys to guitars, too. A lot of people have said tune lower, turn up your bass, but if you have a bassist, all that's gonna do is make you harder to hear over all and muddy up the overall tone. What you need to do is have one guitar's tone focused on high mids and the other's focused on highs. if you do that, the individual tones won't be as full, but then when playing as the whole band, you'll be able to pick everything out from everything else and it'll create a much larger overall sound.
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#15
^This guy is right. Let the bass handle the lows, and if you have two guitarists, have them EQ'd differently. Stereo really helps. A 1x12 cab is basically worthless in terms of big sound. You need a 2x12 at least.

And when you're playing, don't have both guitarists doing the same thing. You need to be able to orchestrate the different guitars so that they don't conflict with each other, but complement. And you can't make them too complicated, or they mess with the singer and are distracting.

AND DON'T SCOOP YOUR MIDS!
In a band, the guitars are the mid instruments. Take 'em out, just sounds like crap.
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#16
Yea, I've never understood the midscoop. my amp has a mid scoop button, and I've never even thought of pressing it, but anytime someone else touches my amp, it's like the first thing they go to. I know it might sound better when the guitar is by itself, but as soon as you mix it with a whole band, the guitar just dissappears... unless you turn up to amp breaking volume. I think that's why a lot of guitarists have full stacks for even just small, local bands. Their eq is so off that they have to have twice as much volume to be heard.
I have an addiction...

Les Paul style DeArmond
Danelectro baritone
Rickenbacker 360/12
defretted Strat
lap steel
Yamaha CP-70
Yamaha P-90
Kay archtop
Kay Tenor Banjo
Oud
Sitar
Harmonium
Melodica
Cello

http://www.myspace.com/hi9
#17
on acoustics i have the mids down, but on electrics, mids are good.
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#18
make your tones complement each other, one guitar being more mid/high heavy and the other being heavier on the lows. also try and avoid playing the same thing for the most part, makes it more dramatic when you play the exact same notes and fills out the sound more... you dont even have to do 5ths or 7ths, even one of you playing an octave up will make your sound 'bigger'.
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#20
Hi9 must know what he's talking about. He has an oud. But aside from that, I have to agree exactly. If you want things to stand out, they have to have their own sonic space. That can mean different timbres (EQ, string guage, pickups, etc.), playing in different ranges (thirds, octaves, whatever), etc. Bottom of guitars compete with bass. Mids on guitars can compete with vocals, which is sometimes why *a little* cutting of mids can help vocals not get killed by guitars. Cutting in the high end of the guitars and adding high end on the vox will help solve that too.

Another aspect of sonic space is this.... not *everything* can be big. If you have big bass, you won't usually have a big kick drum. If you have big drums, and bass you won't usually have big guitars.

Thin out the drums and bass - not just their frequencies, but simplifying their parts, and the guitars will sound bigger. As a producer of recordings.... or as a producer of a *live show*, you have to determine what the mix will feature. For pop-based bands, it is the vocals, so things need to be cut and mixed, etc. to make room for them.

So.... which do you want to be bigger.... the guitars or the drums? Let that be bigger, and live with the other needing to be smaller to make room for it.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
axemanchris, you must know what you're talking about because you have a yorkville cab... my bassist and I both use traynor by yorkville as our main amps, and our favorite local soundguy uses mainly yorkville.

Oh, and my name's Chris, too. Nice to meet you.
I have an addiction...

Les Paul style DeArmond
Danelectro baritone
Rickenbacker 360/12
defretted Strat
lap steel
Yamaha CP-70
Yamaha P-90
Kay archtop
Kay Tenor Banjo
Oud
Sitar
Harmonium
Melodica
Cello

http://www.myspace.com/hi9
#22
There's a mid knob on most amps for a reason. If your guitarists aren't using mids, they should, because without them, you and the crowd won't be able to hear what the hell they're playing over eveything else. Of course, don't overdo them, either. I also find that using heavier, shorter picks helps give more control over picking, and a bigger sound. As for what my EQ likings are, I generally go Bass:8 Mid:7-8 Treble:8-9, with the level control down, and the volume up more. Of course, it all comes down to their liking, though.
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#23
It never sounds as good with distortion and the stuff you'll be playing. But reverb.
Get some vibe dial, man, I need some vibe.

Yeah, reverb. All of a sudden you are playing a huge concert hall, regardless of where you are.
#24
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#25
Nice meeting you Hi9...er.....Chris....

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#26
Get a bigger amp.lol
Guitarman4040
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#27
try turning ur distortion down a bit that gives ur sound more of an attack and helps it pop out more
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