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#1
For me it was basically listening to songs I liked and matching what I heard until I could make my own stuff, basically improving over the rythym of what they played. I have never really learned scales or modes but I can always hold my own due to feel of a song even if its the first time I've heard it, I can step in and make a decent solo to it on the first try. So how did you guys learn to solo?
#2
My Guitar Teacher.
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#4
I studied the solos of the masters (and still do).
All things are difficult before they are easy.
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#5
Yeah, a lot initially was copying. What helped a lot was at least knowing a little
bit about theory ahead of time. I at least knew what a key was, what a scale was
and why a scale is not a fingering position. I started with a pentatonic scale.
That at least helped to put copying solos in some context. I could see where
someone else was using the scale and where they'd go outside and I could
begin to incorporate that stuff.

This was at a time before the internet and readily available tabs. You actually had
to figure stuff out by listening. Nowadays, it seems like a lot of people don't
have even the slightest clue about minimal music theory. Moreover, they seem
to think learning any is a waste of time. amazing!
#6
You need to know scales in order to improvise solos. I suggest learning the major and minor scales, as you can know the relative minors of the majors to solo in.
#7
i listened to a song,when i feel like want to play the solos's song,i search the tab,then pracrice it...begin from the easiest solos until the hard solos..
#8
Quote by Ascendancy5
You need to know scales in order to improvise solos. I suggest learning the major and minor scales, as you can know the relative minors of the majors to solo in.



I meerly asked how y'all learned to solo, not to tell me how I'm doing wrong. I dont feel I need to know scales and modes. If I can solo just fine, not just my opinion its also the opinion of everyone whos heard me play, then I dont really need to change anything. Old blues players never learned scales the did it all by feel, learning scales to solo with is the pussy way in my opinion.
#9
Quote by LuthierofTexas
Old blues players never learned scales the did it all by feel, learning scales to solo with is the pussy way in my opinion.


Haha. Well whatever works for ya and that's a very interesting opinion. Some
might call it an ignorant opinion, but I'm sure you'll get plenty of feedback on
that one from others.
#10
"I dont feel I need to know scales and modes. If I can solo just fine, not just my opinion its also the opinion of everyone whos heard me play"

you my friend are an idiot and not only are u an idiot u are arrogant as well. why dont u try soloing over something other than powerchords for a change. learn ur goddamn scales, its not hard u f'in slacker. and u call yourself a guitar player. hahaha

then again, maybe u can play like joe satriani, then in that case...i'm wrong
rawwwwwwwwwwww
#11
^ dude, nobody can play like joe satriani....... i think we all know that, and as for the kid talkin' about learning scales is the "pussy" way to learn to solo i think he's just too lazy to learn how to, one day someones gonna play something that doesnt fit into a really specific shape that he's used to and he's gonna be SOOOOOO screwed..... as for me, i learned by studying others from blues to classical, jazz and metal i never actually learned to many of others solo's but more so paid attention to the notes that are played against each other and how they affect everything.....
#12
Quote by Mr. Raw
"I dont feel I need to know scales and modes. If I can solo just fine, not just my opinion its also the opinion of everyone whos heard me play"

you my friend are an idiot and not only are u an idiot u are arrogant as well. why dont u try soloing over something other than powerchords for a change. learn ur goddamn scales, its not hard u f'in slacker. and u call yourself a guitar player. hahaha

then again, maybe u can play like joe satriani, then in that case...i'm wrong


Wow, quick change of opinions there.
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#13
Quote by Ascendancy5
You need to know scales in order to improvise solos. I suggest learning the major and minor scales, as you can know the relative minors of the majors to solo in.

i've jammed with people that didnt know the slightest amount of theory and could play amazing solos, sure they were sticking to the right key, they just didnt know exactly what they were doing.


but he did step over the line calling me a pussy because I know theory, lol
#14
Guitar teacher. Unfortunately, I only had time to learn the pentatonic scales real well, and I'm working on the major scales right now.
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#15
i went to all-guitar-chords.com and i learned the A minor pentatonic and just noodled around with it. then i learned the rest of the shapes and where they go in different keys and just jamed with cds and my friends. ive actually never learned a full solo. i tried like one solo and didnt finish it. i would just try to make my own solos because thats what my guitar player friend told me.
#17
I didnt say that knowing theory is a pussy thing to do. I said that knowing every scale front to back and sideways to just slam out a bunch of notes in the right key is the pussy thing to do. Just because you know scales doesnt make you a great guitar player and just because you dont know scales dont make you less of a guitar player. If you cant feel the rythym of a song as soon as it starts and automatically know how it feels and what you feel is the right thing to play at the right time then knowing all the scales and modes wont do a damn thing to help you. I've played long enough to know what notes sound good run together forming a solo over whatever key a song is played in. But I think if oyu know your scales and always stick to them then all of your solos end up sounding exactly the same.

And for whoever said I only play over power chords or whatever you said. You are actually wrong. I can play power chords and play over them well, but Im not Green Day and never want to be Green Day. I play lead for a more diversified set of genres then you would ever be able to play along with. I can play lead for jazz, country, blues, southern rock, hard rock, metal, delta blues, and ever rap and techno, so I think and correct me if I'm wrong, most of those genres dont base around power chords.
#18
^ actually not to be a dick but a chord is typically a root + fifth + any extension (maj/min 3rd, 7th, 6th etc etc) and a jazz uses lots of 7ths, rock, metal and blues (blues uses some 7ths as well) both use lots of "power chords" (root + fifth) country uses lots of major chords (root + fifth + major 3rd) rap uses a mix of genres from blues to classical and techno uses basic major/minor patterns so really in the ideal of it, everything most every plays over has a powerchord for the basis but there are extended notes that further define the chord being played and if you play as well as you SAY you do, then surely you know scales, you just don't know the names or specifics of them. and actually music is based more directly off of intervals than scales, scales just give a good starting point but generally people who don't know anything about theory and just play random notes tend to sound like crap. oh yeah, one last thing, the definitions about the genres of music i listed above aren't set in stone, there are many bands/songs and artists that don't follow those guidlines, those are just brief generalizations.
#19
Quote by LuthierofTexas
I didnt say that knowing theory is a pussy thing to do. I said that knowing every scale front to back and sideways to just slam out a bunch of notes in the right key is the pussy thing to do. Just because you know scales doesnt make you a great guitar player and just because you dont know scales dont make you less of a guitar player. If you cant feel the rythym of a song as soon as it starts and automatically know how it feels and what you feel is the right thing to play at the right time then knowing all the scales and modes wont do a damn thing to help you. I've played long enough to know what notes sound good run together forming a solo over whatever key a song is played in. But I think if oyu know your scales and always stick to them then all of your solos end up sounding exactly the same.


Well, I really think you have some big misconceptions about scales and don't
understand how to use them. That's what I get out of what you just said. Scales
go a long way to help you get the skill to be able to play like you say. But, if
you believe hunt and peck and grope around method works better for you,
happy trails.
#20
I learned by way of scales, I think it is the easier way. IMO, learning by listening to music and reproducing it is a tougher way to learn. There is a lot more trial and error to find out what sounds good, but it probably developes a better ear in the end.

Just because someone learns to play by listening does not mean they do not know scales. They are most likely playing one of the common scales and just don't realize it. Grab any song, and the majority of the notes will fall into one scale or another.

It all results to the same thing anyway, playing intervals to make music. Once you get to a certain level, it will be the persons style that comes through.
#21
i found that, aswell as scales, it is helpful to build up a load of licks that you have heard other peeps use and learn how to play them in different keys and then join a load of them together to make a simple solo.

it's not ideal in the long-term but it is useful to build confidence up when you are just starting and you then develop your own licks
#23
^ yeah but if yer just randomly picking notes they can often sound sour or way off. like i said, scales are a good starter tool
#24
the music I listen to (it just came with the territory)

ex: classic rock, metal (all of it) & shred of course...
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#26
Personally I think of the chord shapes and try to solo around those main notes in the chords I.E. an E at the open position, D shape at 2nd fret d string, etc
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#27
Quote by edg
If that was aimed at me, it completely misinterprets what I was trying to say.
I did not say use random notes.


i assumed it probably wasn't what you meant but when you say you can use ANY note, i think ANY note.... like if you're playing something in A minor and use a B flat it will probably sound off and kinda jacked up, again there are rules where this wouldn't be true (such as if the rhythm was playing a Bmin and you are using the a minor scale in the 2nd position and use a Bb to melodically minor the emphasis on the B) but what i meant was that you can't just play ANY notes and have it sound good, yes you can play any note, but under certain circumstances it won't always sound good.
#28
how did i learn to solo? i didn't, i just do it...nobody can "learn" how to solo without just doing it...improvise over backing tracks and learn for yourself what sounds good and what doesn't - try not to make your playing too positional
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#29
Quote by z4twenny
i assumed it probably wasn't what you meant but when you say you can use ANY note, i think ANY note.... like if you're playing something in A minor and use a B flat it will probably sound off and kinda jacked up, again there are rules where this wouldn't be true (such as if the rhythm was playing a Bmin and you are using the a minor scale in the 2nd position and use a Bb to melodically minor the emphasis on the B) but what i meant was that you can't just play ANY notes and have it sound good, yes you can play any note, but under certain circumstances it won't always sound good.


No, I'll stand by ANY note in the general case. "Sounds good" is a judgement.
I assume you might mean dissonant. That might be entirely what you're aiming
for. You might have substituted in another scale to get from here to there. To
make a point. Might be a passing tone. There's probably some way of making
any note "work" at any place providing you've set up the context for it.

Scales give you the tools to do that and to do that INTENTIONALLY. It's really
all about what your intention is. No, you can't just play any note randomly and
have it sound "good". But you CAN make a really dissonant note sound good
if you're very clever and skilled and there's a method to your madness. And
basically scales really help to put the method into the madness.
#30
^ again,not to be an ass but you're contradicting yourself, you're saying you can play ANY note in the right context be it dissonant or consonant and it will sound good and i disagree, thats like saying i can just kick my guitar and as long as i kick it with finesse and rhythm it will sound good, in which "sound good" is subjective to the listener, what i think sounds good and what you think sounds good are two totally different things, play a little diddy in A# major then play an overlapping melody in B phrygian, you are then essentially playing a grouping of those "any" notes you are referring to and i can pretty much promise you that unless you sit down and work out a basis before hand it's not gonna sound too great, even if what you're going for is dissonance, theres good dissonance and not so good dissonance, dimebag was a master of the ideal that you can play whatever you think sounds good regardless of whether or not it was "in key" and pretty much all of his leads followed melodic and harmonic and dissonance guidelines even if he wasn't consciously aware of it.
#31
Quote by z4twenny
^ again,not to be an ass but you're contradicting yourself, you're saying you can play ANY note in the right context be it dissonant or consonant and it will sound good and i disagree, thats like saying i can just kick my guitar and as long as i kick it with finesse and rhythm it will sound good, in which "sound good" is subjective to the listener, what i think sounds good and what you think sounds good are two totally different things, play a little diddy in A# major then play an overlapping melody in B phrygian, you are then essentially playing a grouping of those "any" notes you are referring to and i can pretty much promise you that unless you sit down and work out a basis before hand it's not gonna sound too great, even if what you're going for is dissonance, theres good dissonance and not so good dissonance, dimebag was a master of the ideal that you can play whatever you think sounds good regardless of whether or not it was "in key" and pretty much all of his leads followed melodic and harmonic and dissonance guidelines even if he wasn't consciously aware of it.


but you can play a dissonant note in a certain context regardless of whether or not it falls into a certain guideline...maybe it's just what sounds good to the person playing or composing the song
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#32
^ i'll agree with that, there are times when a dissonant note sounds good as a passing tone, a chord extension, semitonal movements between root chords changes (like the Bb against the B min example listed above) but again, these things are based off of some counterpoint and music theory, all i'm trying to say is you can't just play random notes and expect them to sound good there does indeed need to be a method to the madness so to speak, i understand the idea of using all 12 notes in a solo, i do it often, in fact thats pretty much my signature..... i just don't want a noob to read this and say "oh well i can play whatever the hell i want it doesn't matter" 'cuz in the context of the song it does matter, you need to know how to use all the notes, in fact i recommend to anyone studying enough theory to understand how to do this effectively so that you're not limited to just a grouping of scales.
#34
I dont want to start a new thread, and this sort of applies... What do you use for backing tracks to improvise over? And where do you get them? I cant seem to find anything.
Last edited by Ash on fires at Aug 19, 2006,
#36
Quote by Ash on fires
I dont want to start a new thread, and this sort of applies... What do you use for backing tracks to improve over? And where do you get them? I cant seem to find anything.


i personally may use guitar pro and loop a backing track while playing over it, but most of the time i just record one and improvise over it...i also have a book on improvisation with backing tracks on a cd that i can play over, so that helps

i'm not sure of a website where you can download backing tracks, try google
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#37
is it true that guitar pro can recognize the sound and tell us how to play the song from tab...?
#38
Quote by universal_man
is it true that guitar pro can recognize the sound and tell us how to play the song from tab...?


if by "recognize" you mean playing a song into your speaker and guitar pro magically tabbing it out for you, then yes, of course

seriously though, people just write tabs and put them into guitar pro, which plays it back so that you can hear what it sounds like instead of guessing when looking at it, not to mention it has note durations and is also written in standard notation - it's also easy to use because it has a built in metronome and speed builder, so you can change the tempo of the song and such
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it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


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#40
well, there's 2 ways...

legally (costs $$$) from the GP site...

or...

limewire lol (not that it's illegal)
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