#1
i am new to bass and was wondering if anyone had a chart that has the layout of the fretboard with every note. It would be so nice if i could get a link or a pic or something. thanks.
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#2
Here ya go.


G|-G#-|-A-|-A#-|-B-|-C-|-C#-|-D-|-D#-|-E-|-F-|-F#-|-G-|
D|-D#-|-E-|-F-|-F#-|-G-|-G#-|-A-|-A#-|-B-|-C-|-C#-|-D-|
A|-A#-|-B-|-C-|-C#-|-D-|-D#-|-E-|-F-|-F#-|-G-|-G#-|-A-|
E|-F-|-F#-|-G-|-G#-|-A-|-A#-|-B-|-C-|-C#-|-D-|-D#-|-E-|

   1     2      3     4     5     6     7    8     9     10   11    12


Hopefully that comes out right.

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#3
it is called the chromatic scale!!
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#4

B string
B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B
E string
E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E
A string
A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A
D string
D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D
G string
G G# A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G
C string
C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C


What I used.
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#6
by the way its Bb not A#
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#9
Or if you're like many bassists around here it's...


G-------------------------------
D--------------------------------
A---------------------------------
E---------0----0----0----0---------
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#10
Quote by MetalUpTheAss
I prefer sharps to flats.


yes but A# is not correct its Bb...
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#11
actually it would be A#. UtBDan had a very good explanation of that somwhere.

since he's going up from A a half step, which would be the diminished A, it would be A#.
if he would be going down a half step from B, or B minor, it would be Bb.

or something like that. correct me if im wrong, please.
Last edited by SocKo? at Aug 18, 2006,
#14
well my MUSIC teacher (who is excellent at piano) said that it would be Bb because if you go round and round it would be Bb (its hard to explain) whatever the meaning it is correct in theroy to use Bb and never use A#
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#15
Quote by dariusfinch
A# and Bb is just the same thing, i think?


Yes, it's entirely semantics.

What my teacher of 25 years experience told me is A#. I'm stickin' with him.
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#16
Pfft, as long as it sounds the same we have no problem. So call it either.
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#17
Quote by myself101
by the way its Bb not A#


It all depends on if the key your playing in is a sharp or flat key/scale.

In keys G-C# it would be refered to as a sharp.
In keys F-Cb it would be refered to as a flat.

It's all relitive to the Circle of Fifths . You should really learn it.

It's also called an enharmonic (same note different name). Enharmonics occur at every note up to a step on either side of a note, but most commonly only a half step away.

A / A#-Bb / B-Cb / B#-C / C#-Db / D / D#-Eb / E-Fb / E#-F / F#-Gb / G / G#-Ab / A
Last edited by elemenohpee at Aug 18, 2006,
#18
It's easier just to go with a piano.... the keys directly correspond to the fret positions....
#19
Quote by elemenohpee
It all depends on if the key your playing in is a sharp or flat key/scale.

In keys G-C# it would be refered to as a sharp.
In keys F-Cb it would be refered to as a flat.

It's all relitive to the Circle of Fifths . You should really learn it.

It's also called an enharmonic (same note different name). Enharmonics occur at every note up to a step on either side of a note, but most commonly only a half step away.

A / A#-Bb / B-Cb / B#-C / C#-Db / D / D#-Eb / E-Fb / E#-F / F#-Gb / G / G#-Ab / A


best explanation here...
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#20
Quote by elemenohpee
It all depends on if the key your playing in is a sharp or flat key/scale.

In keys G-C# it would be refered to as a sharp.
In keys F-Cb it would be refered to as a flat.

It's all relitive to the Circle of Fifths . You should really learn it.

It's also called an enharmonic (same note different name). Enharmonics occur at every note up to a step on either side of a note, but most commonly only a half step away.

A / A#-Bb / B-Cb / B#-C / C#-Db / D / D#-Eb / E-Fb / E#-F / F#-Gb / G / G#-Ab / A


yeah that seems to make sense but in music theory you always use Bb instead of A# according to my music teacher because if you go around and around the whole musical A to G it ends up being Bb not A#, dont ask me why he didn't go into great detail about it just to always use Bb, so i suppose it could change in Keys G-C#, ill ask him about it next lesson.
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#21
Bb and A# are the same note but Bb is always used im not sure why though.
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#22
^Bb is used much more often due to the fact that it is in every single key involving flats, while A# is only used in keys with 5 or more sharps
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#23
Quote by myself101
yeah that seems to make sense but in music theory you always use Bb instead of A# according to my music teacher because if you go around and around the whole musical A to G it ends up being Bb not A#, dont ask me why he didn't go into great detail about it just to always use Bb, so i suppose it could change in Keys G-C#, ill ask him about it next lesson.


What type of music are you playing? Music style tends to lend itself towards what key you are playing in more than anything. I've been playing classical music for 10 years now (not on bass), and jazz and rock for only 4 years. Classical is most commonly played in sharp keys, so I tend to think in all sharps. Jazz and rock tend to be played in flat keys. It's just something you have to get used to.

Quote by Mantiscabinet
^Bb is used much more often due to the fact that it is in every single key involving flats, while A# is only used in keys with 5 or more sharps


Good point.

But it still depends on what key your in for the name. While Bb is the more common because of the number of keys it's in, it does not justify that it is commonly called Bb. (Unless it's in the Key of C, then you can call it a Bb, as long as you call every other note not in the major scale a flat as well.)