#1
hey, iv'e learnt about building arpeggios, little triads and and 7th chords, bt was wondering how i put together bigger arpeggios like the full 6 string ones some people use

any help would be nice thanks
Quote by 6WS
haha, that is going to be the biggest p*ssy magnet since the keyboard neck tie.
#2
take a scale pattern... throw together notes that sound nice get it down smooth... do it for all the other positions of the scale and blah therse a cripe load of arpeggios i know thas not how your sposta do it er whatever but it always worked for me
#3
Just do it in two octaves.
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#4
Quote by Kartman
Just do it in two octaves.


like you could just do R, 3, 5, R, 3, 5? im gonna go try it
Quote by 6WS
haha, that is going to be the biggest p*ssy magnet since the keyboard neck tie.
#5
just pick a certain position of whatever scale you're using (not that i agree with positional playing) and pick out the notes of whatever chord you're looking to make...voila, there it is, an arpeggio
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#6
Quote by jackson_marshal
like you could just do R, 3, 5, R, 3, 5? im gonna go try it


Yes... you're not restricted to only using each chord tone once.
#7
One technique that i teach students is to map out every note of a chord on the fretboard, then just find fingerings that work. Any one arpeggion can yield many various fingerings. The real fun comes when you do this with a progression. The first one I teach is iim7, V7, I6. Map out a Dm7, G7 and C6, play them together and try to make phrases out of it. Jazz standards are great, like in "The Real Book". Simply take a few chord charts from a book or even online, paly arpeggios through the entire sequence, paying particular attention to melodic contour and rhythm.

PM me if you would like further info on this.