#1
Hi a few questions

When Playing major scalse, do u have to start on the root when playing it?

How do i aprregio a chord, with in a solo? Do i jus play say G,E,C when a C maj is playing them, a,c,e when am is playing etc?

Thanks

Daryl
#3
you don't have to start on the root when playing a scale, but is it customary and realistic to do so when practicing scales for the sake of technique

to arpeggiate a chord, simply play the notes of the chord individually rather than letting them bleed into each other, so yes, C, E, and G would form a C maj while A, C, and E would form an Amin
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#4
Quote by aidan_taylor
ofcourse u ****in tit
*reported*

That isn't even accurate information.

Quote by axe_grinder247
to arpeggiate a chord, simply play the notes of the chord individually rather than letting them bleed into each other
That's not quite right. Fretting a chord and playing the notes individually, letting them bleed into each other is still an arpeggio.

Sweeping=/=Apreggio
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Aug 19, 2006,
#6
but an arepeggio is notes of a chord played separately, and letting them play simultaneously would make it seem like a chord...you're still right though, i'm just implying that they are usually played without letting them ring together
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by Sharp_as_steel
Axe_grinder pwns!!!!



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Last edited by axe_grinder247 at Aug 19, 2006,
#7
alot of people play around the root note and come back to it often. I am not exactly sure why but i would stick to that as a technique and alot of people end their licks and what not on the root note too.
#8
Here another question, wot the differnce between the major scales.

I mean I was listen to a song In C, so I messed around IN C major, and IN G majar and A major, cuz they all have the same notes kinda bar one or 2.

So is there overlaping or something, or is it to do with coming back to the root of the scale?
#9
Actually, each key only varies slightly from one key to the next.

I'll list all the notes in each major key of the Major Scale...

A = A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#
B = B, C#, D#, E, F#, G# A#
C = C, D, E, F, G, A, B
D = D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#
E = E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#
F = F, G, A, A#, B#, C#, D#
G = G, A, B, C, D, E, F#

As you can see, the key C, which have no sharps/flats (depending on how you look at it), is much different from the key B, which has five sharps/flats.