#1
Welcome to my third installment of Modality. In this lesson, I'll be explaining how modes can help you to create tasteful chord progressions.
You should already know by no how to create modes, and how chords fit over modes. These are both covered in my previous two installments.

Lets get started!


+--------------------------------

Contents

 [b]4.0[/b]       Chords Over Modes                      Installment 2
   [b]4.1[/b]     The four Triads                        Installment 2
   [b]4.2[/b]     Major Modes                            Installment 2
   [b]4.3[/b]     The Minor Modes                        Installment 2
   [b]4.4[/b]     Whats left? Locrian                    Installment 2
   [b]4.5[/b]     Extending your chords                  Installment 2
    [b]4.5.1[/b]    Ionian Mode                          Installment 2
    [b]4.5.2[/b]    Dorian Mode                          Installment 2
    [b]4.5.3[/b]    Phrygian Mode                        Installment 2
    [b]4.5.4[/b]    Lydian Mode                          Installment 2
    [b]4.5.5[/b]    Mixolydian Mode                      Installment 2
    [b]4.5.6[/b]    Aeolian Mode                         Installment 2
    [b]4.5.7[/b]    Locrian Mode                         Installment 2
   [b]4.6[/b]     Just looking for that feeling?!        Installment 2
   [b]4.7[/b]     Until next time!                       Installment 2

 [b]5.0[/b]       Modal Chord Progressions               Installment 3
   [b]5.1[/b]     What is a chord progression
   [b]5.2[/b]     Refreshing your mind
   [b]5.3[/b]     Moving Modes
    [b]5.3.1[/b]    Step 1 - Moving to the mode
    [b]5.3.2[/b]    Step 2 - Applying the rules
   [b]5.4[/b]     Roman Numerals
   [b]5.5[/b]     And there you have it!

 [b]6.0[/b]       Harmonic and Melodic Minor Modes       Installment 4

+--------------------------------


5.1 - What is a chord progression

A chord progression is basically what it says. A progression, or series, of chords. Some chords sound good together, some sound bad. Some sound average and some sound awesome.
Every band uses chord progressions, if not in their guitars, in their singing. Progressions are used as a base for improvisation, solos, singing and so on.

Now, this is where modes come into it.
If you remember back to the Modal Chords installation, you'll remember that we can build a chord for each interval, or degree, of the major scale.
Because there are 7 notes in each mode, that means you can create 7 triads in total for each mode, one triad for each degree of the mode.


5.2 - Refreshing your mind

In installment 1, we realised that the major scale can construct 7 different modes.
In installment 2, we realised that each mode has a certain triad that can fit over it.

This is what we came to:

 Ionian       Major
 Dorian       Minor
 Phrygian     Minor
 Lydian       Major
 Mixolydian   Major
 Aeolian      Minor
 Locrian      Diminished

If you do not understand this, read back over installment 2!

Without realising it, you have just worked out the Major scales, or Ionian Modes chord progression.
How? You ask?
Easy. Remember I said degree of a mode can create its own chord? Well, in the diagram above, you have the modes for each degree of the major scale!

  1      2      3      4      5      6         7        1
Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major


Ok, so, we have created the Ionian modes chord progression.
What next? The rest of the modes!


5.3 - Moving Modes

Ok, This part is simple. To create mode chord progressions based on modes, there are two steps.

1 - Moving to the mode
2 - Applying the rules


5.3.1 - Step 1 - Moving to the mode

So, Lets move to another mode from the Ionian Mode.
Say, Dorian, seeing as its the next one along. Dorian is the 2nd degree of the Major scale. So how do we make a chord progression of this?
First of all, we need to look back at our chord progression of the major scale, this time, look at the intervals:

  1      2      3      4      5      6         7        1
Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major

The major scale chord progression starts on "1" and ends on "1"
This is because its the 1st degree of the major scale.

So, if Dorian is the second degree of the major scale, that means we start on "2" and end on "2"!
Lets apply this to the chords:

  2      3      4      5      6         7        1      2
Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor

See! That wasn't so hard was it! All we've done, is shift the chord progression one chord to the left. So, we've taken the first chord, Major, at put it at the end.


Lets try another one to get you in the hang of it.
Lets do Aeolian. Aeolian is the 6th mode of the major scale, therefore, we need to start on "6" and end on "6".

  6         7        1      2      3      4      5      6
Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor


Understand it now? This is the first of the two steps to creating chord progressions.
You've successfully "moved the mode".

Just for a visual guide, I've wrote out the basic chord progressions of each of the modes below:

 Ionian      Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor  Diminished
 Dorian      Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major
 Phrygian    Minor  Major  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor
 Lydian      Major  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor
 Mixolydian  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor  Major
 Aeolian     Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major
 Locrian     Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor


5.3.2 - Step 2 - Applying the rules

There's one rule to apply to these chord progressions. This is where it might get a little tricky. Its important that you fully understand mode construction and the intervals for modes from this point.

I have explained how to create a basic modal chord progression. The next part is how to get the sound to have a "mood".

Each mode has intervals. These modes sound unique because they have flats and sharps, and they change depending on what mode your using.
Below, I have re-wrote the intervals for each mode. This is to jog your memory, and to use as a guide for the next step.

 Ionian Mode         1  2  3  4  5  6  7  1
 Dorian Mode         1  2 b3  4  5  6 b7  1
 Phrygian Mode       1 b2 b3  4  5 b6 b7  1
 Lydian Mode         1  2  3 #4  5  6  7  1
 Mixolydian Mode     1  2  3  4  5  6 b7  1
 Aeolian Mode        1  2 b3  4  5 b6 b7  1
 Locrian Mode        1 b2 b3  4 b5 b6 b7  1

So how do we apply the rule?
Well, you need to transfer these flats (b) and sharps (#) to the chord progression.

So, lets take an easy example, Lydian, because it only has 1 sharp and no flats.

Lydian is the 4th mode of the Major scale. It only has one sharp, which is on the 4th degree.
Lets take the Lydian Chord Progression now:

              1      2      3         4        5      6      7     <-- Intervals
Lydian      Major  Major  Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor

Now, If we look at the intervals used on the Lydian chord progression, and compare them to the Lydian modes actual intervals, you can see, the chord progression is missing a sharp on the 4th degree.
To correct this, we need to make the 4th chord in that progression, a sharp. Therefore:

              1      2      3           #4           5      6      7     <-- Intervals
Lydian      Major  Major  Minor  Sharp-Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor


See what I've done? Lets take another example, but a little more harder. The Aeolian mode.
The Aeolian mode has the intervals: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1

So, look at the intervals. The 3rd, 6th and 7th degrees are all flats. So lets apply these to our Aeolian Chord Progression:

               1         2        3      4      5      6      7
 Aeolian     Minor  Diminished  Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major

Changes to:

               1         2          b3        4      5        b6          b7
 Aeolian     Minor  Diminished  Flat-Major  Minor  Minor  Flat-Major  Flat-Major


See how it works?
#2
5.4 - Roman Numerals

Ok, so now we have learnt how to create modal chord progressions! Congratulations! But sometimes we need to explain chord progressions.
It seems inappropriate that we have to say each chords full name (like above) to say what chords are in a chord progression, therefore, we use roman numerals.

You may have seen these in music theory, you may have seen them on a sundial. Roman Numerals are like numbers.
Now, how do we change Major, Minor, Diminished, Flat, Sharp into Roman numerals?

Well lets start with the basics.
First of all, we have 7 chords. That means, we need seven roman numerals. These are:

 i - ii - iii - iv - v - vi - vii

Now, these, on their own, don't say much. They say we have 7 of something.
We need to define them to make them relevant to our chords.

Lets start with Major chords. We can define major chords by writing our numerals in CAPITAL LETTERS!
Therefore, if our first chord was major, it would change from "i" to "I"
If our 6th chord was major, it would change from "vi" to "VI"

So, how do we define minor? Easy! We leave them in lowercase letters!

The next one. Diminished chords. Now, Diminished chords can function as Minor chords, because it has a b3, so we write them in lowercase letters.
However, we also need readers to understand that its NOT a minor chord, but it is, in fact a diminished chord. So how do we do it?
To do this, we add a little symbol. The symbol is a little circle, which floats to the right of the numeral.
This is the symbol: °
You can write this symbol by holding down "alt" on your keyboard, and pressing 0 1 7 6 in that order.

So, if our 1st chord is diminished, instead of writing just "i" we will add ° to the end of it, to create this: "i°".
If our 7th chord is diminished, we write: "vii°".

The last two symbols are easy. Flat and Sharp, "b" and "#" respectively.


So, now you know how to describe roman numerals. How do you apply them?
Well, lets take the Ionian Mode chord progression to start with:

 Ionian: Major  Minor  Minor  Major  Major  Minor  Diminished

So, using our new knowledge of Numerals, lets change this into them.

The 1st chord is a Major chord. Therefore our 1st roman numeral will be in CAPITALS.
The 2nd chord is a Minor chord. Therefore our 2nd roman numeral will be in lowercase.
The 3rd chord is a Minor chord. Therefore our 3rd roman numeral will be in lowercase.
The 4th chord is a Major chord. Therefore our 4th roman numeral will be in CAPITALS.
The 5th chord is a Major chord. Therefore our 5th roman numeral will be in CAPITALS.
The 6th chord is a Minor chord. Therefore our 6th roman numeral will be in lowercase.
The 7th chord is a diminished chord. Therefore our 7th roman numeral will be in lowercase, and have a °.

So, using this, lets change it into our numerals:

 Ionian: I  ii  iii IV  V  vi  vii°

This is our Ionian Modes chord progression in Roman numerals!

Now, lets take another example, of a harder one. The Locrian Mode.
We know that in long term, this is what the Locrian mode looks like:

Locrian:
Diminished  Flat-Major  Flat-Minor  Minor  Flat-Major  Flat-Major  Flat-Minor  

So lets change this into roman numerals:

Locrian: i°  bII  biii  IV  bV  bVI  bvii

See how that works?
Eventually, if you work out all the numerals for each mode, you'll end up with this:

Ionian       I   ii   iii   IV   V   vi   vii° 
Dorian       i   ii  bIII   IV   v   vi° bVII
Phrygian     i  bII  bIII   iv   v° bVI  bvii
Lydian       I   II   iii  #iv°  V   vi   vii
Mixolydian   I   ii   iii°  IV   v   vi  bVII
Aeolian      i   ii° bIII   iv   v  bVI  bVII
Locrian      i° bII  biii   iv  bV  bVI  bvii



5.5 - And there you have it!

Well that's the end of this installment. I hope you have understood this lesson, and that it'll come in use for you one day!
My next lesson will cover modes of the harmonic and melodic minor scales. So I look forward to seeing you there!

Best luck!
Been away, am back
#3
Logz list of things to do:
Ill use this post to write up suggestions from others that i need to do
Thanks in advance

Spelling - Done
Changing words around - Done
Checking theory - Semi-done
Been away, am back
#4
5.1:

A chord progressions - Learn English, please

Because there are 7 intervals in each mode - Are there? I only count the minor and major second Rename to notes.

that means you can create 7 different chords for each mode. Depends.. EITHER explain that you can use 7 different notes als roots for each mode, or say that (say) Cmaj and Cmaj7 are different

5.2
instalment Come on

The rest
Also, you type one sometimes as one, sometimes as 1. Same with the other numbers, be consistent

Perhaps call the 'intervals' something else, I'm not sure what, but it doesn't sound right.. For example (one out of many): The 3rd, 6th and 7th intervals are all flats.

Maybe I begin to look less closely, but I don't see many errors here! Good job, Phil!
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#5
Overall without being picky on spelling or that ( just ain't got the time to do so ) a great article which taught me a bit. Looking forward to the next one.
#6
great article..again, i was waiting long for this to come out

well only three suggestions/corrections:

5.1 you wrote " you'll remember that we can built a chord..."

change it to either "you'll remember that we can build a chord..."
or "you'll remember that built a chord..."

5.3.2

under the first code box you wrote "
#7
great article..again, i was waiting long for this to come out

well only three suggestions/corrections:

5.1 you wrote " you'll remember that we can built a chord..."

change it to either "you'll remember that we can build a chord..."
or "you'll remember that built a chord..."

5.3.2

under the first code box you wrote "so how to we apply the rule?"

change to "so how do we apply the rule?"

---
and somewhere along you wrote an alt code ( 0 1 7 6?) for the °
another code is alt 1 6 7 (maybe you'll wanna add that )

EDIT: How did the above post come to be?????
#8
whens the 4th installment coming out, hopefully soon
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#9
You should already know by now how to create modes, and how chords fit over modes. These are both covered in my previous two installments.


/picky

Great lesson, you Loggy, McLoggerson!
#10
ty kirby

permanentmarker, Im working on it now. Its not going to be in great depth, but it will hopefully cover the basics of the modes of harmonic and melodic minor.

Perhaps in a few months time ill do another set of lessons about these as well.
Been away, am back
#11
wooohoooo
these lessons have been a lifesaver, thanks alot for takin the time to teach theory noobs like me all about modes.
i love you


not in a gay way though
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Quote by CoreysMonster

Buy the toilet Hendrix crapped in for the full "Jimi Hendrix Experience"




PM me if you think my drummer looks like angry kid


so far 61 people think he looks like angry kid
#12
in 5.3.1 i noticed that you said "I've wrote out the basic chord..." when it should be written...great lesson though, i'm looking forward to the modes of the harmonic minor, it's always been a bit hazy to me
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