#1
Ionian - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

Dorian - 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1

In the dorian mode of the major scale do you just play half a step down on each third and seventh note of the scale? For example in teh A major scale the third note is C#, so now is the dorian mode it would become a C note instead. If I am completely off, please try and straighten me out.
#2
Yes, you are absolutely correct! :-)

An example:

A Major = A B C# D E F# G# A
A Dorian = A B C D E F# G A

Another example:

C Major = C D E F G A B C

D Major = D E F# G A B C# D
D Dorian = D E F G A B C D

So C Major (C Ionian) and D Dorian have the same notes, but they sound very different.
#3
Well since this thread ended so quick and I don't want to take up extra room on the site and this is relative etc. I have a question. Alright so if the ionian of the key of C has the same exact notes as D dorian as above stated, how in the world can they sound different if they're the same notes?
#4
Quote by musiclover2399
how in the world can they sound different if they're the same notes?
Different root, different chord played underneath, different sound.
#6
Quote by musiclover2399
Well the root I guess I sort of get but what if you only have one guitarist? would the bass differentiate using the other notes on a chord besides the root?
It would be the implied harmony by the guitar.

I'm not sure what you're trying to say about the bass.
#7
Thanks, I've been trying to really understand this for a while, and I finally get it.
#8
musiclover2399: I kind of hoped someone would ask this question, and I'm glad you did.

The thing is.. the emphasis is very important.

In the key of C you have the notes C D E F G A B C.

If you play the notes C, E and G at the same time.. that's a C Major chord.. very happy sounding. If you play the notes A, C and E at the same time... that's an A Minor chord - it's a more dark sounding chord. Only one note has changed, but they sound very different.

The only interval that is different between a major and a minor chord is the "third" note.

A major chord has a major third (4 half-steps between the root and the third note). Example: C to E.

A minor chord has a minor third (3 half-steps between the root and the third note). Example: A to C.

Everything is compared to the root note, and therefore each of the modes of the major scale (or any other scale) sound very different.

If you play the notes of the C major scale over the an C bass note, everything is compared to that bass note, and you are playing in C major.

If you play the notes of the C major scale over the an A bass note, everything is compared to that bass note, and you are actually playing in A minor.

Try playing the notes of the C major scale over and E bass note. It should sound very spanish or "eastern". You are actually playing the E phrygian mode in the key of C major.

Try searching on google on how to make modal chord progressions - instead of just playing over a single bass note... I'm a little too drunk too help you on this.