#1
Well heres the deal. I know NOTHING about anything really. I don't really know how to improvise, I don't know any scales, I don't know what modes even are and I want to learn how to solo and stuff. And I know nothing about theory, so its kinda hard for me. I don't know what penatonics and other stuff I see you talking about in this forum are either. I'm so lost when I come here

So yea, I wanna learn theory and stuff, but my guitar teacher is teaching me how to read music and I don't even care about learning it because I suck at it and see no purpose in learning . I just want to get a good understanding of all the things listed and above and anything I left out. I just wanna improvise


help!!!
#2
read he column about stuck in a rod
and check the lessons section for beginners
get guitar scales method

that's all i have to say
Hold my breath
as I wish for death
Oh please god wake me
#4
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html wonderful theory lesson

cyberfret.com teaches you the basics techniques theory chords and more great stuff

http://guitar.about.com/ has a good improv lesson

also try searching the forums and reading the colimns and lessons here on UG
#5
tell your teacher that you dont want to lear standard notation.. just tabs. if you decide later, you cant still learn to read sheet music.

practice major and minor scales (C G D E)

and practice pentatonic scales (A D E B)

for now, forget about improving and theory.. but if you think you can handle it, try and read up on music theory as much as possible.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php - has all the scales youll EVER need, as well as a way to find out what chord youre playing and even a HUGE chord finder.

befoer you can sit down and improv like a bad ass you still need to know what youre doing.. because to improv in the key of C, you still need to know your way in and out of the c scale

remember.. even clapton and henrdix had to learn scales.
#6
yeah its impossible to improvise if you dont know the notes your playing, the only way to good improv is learning scales and theory, learning how to read standard music notation is a must if you want to be a good guitarist, not just the average horrible, ignorant guitarist who neglects theory
A man said to the universe:
"Sir, I exist!"
"However," replied the universe,
"The fact has not created in me
a sense of obligation."
#8
Quote by dlboru2
learning how to read standard music notation is a must if you want to be a good guitarist



not fully disagreeing here, but...

The Beatles couldnt read staff.
#9
Quote by hippie_cune
not fully disagreeing here, but...

The Beatles couldnt read staff.


[rant] I however fully disagree. Learning how to read staff and knowing theory are not the ONLY way to get good. Jimi and Slash supposedly didn't know any theory at all. They improvised by ear. Knowing all that stuff may help but isn't mandatory that you learn it all. GAWD! [/rant]
Last edited by hamett91 at Aug 21, 2006,
#10
I'm assuming you read that lesson, I just wanted to say this:

If you say you suck at reading sheet music, that's a reason to keep at it, not avoid it, but if you want to start in music theory, reading sheet music is a good thing to be able to do, but that's just my opinion.
#12
Quote by dlboru2
yeah its impossible to improvise if you dont know the notes your playing, the only way to good improv is learning scales and theory, learning how to read standard music notation is a must if you want to be a good guitarist, not just the average horrible, ignorant guitarist who neglects theory


Learning how to read standard notation is not exactly comparable to theory. The only thing that you get from stand. not. that you can't get from tab is the timing. In your defense however, I know there are some guitarists who don't know jack about theory, but it sure makes things easier on yourself. Most especially the theory behind chord creation.
#13
Quote by Unbridled
Learning how to read standard notation is not exactly comparable to theory. The only thing that you get from stand. not. that you can't get from tab is the timing. In your defense however, I know there are some guitarists who don't know jack about theory, but it sure makes things easier on yourself. Most especially the theory behind chord creation.

Well, with standard notation, you also get the overall speed at which you should play the piece, how energetically, where you should accent/not accent notes, and when to speed up. With standard notation, you don't need to necessarily have heard the piece to be able to play it.

But tabs are more common, so many people just use those.
#15
Ohhhhh..... booooyyyyyy....... so hard for me not to rant on this topic.....

Tab, though useful for the internet, seeing as standard notation is cumbersome on the net for most people and their purposes, is, IMNSHO, the biggest culprit in the fact that guitarists everywhere are notoriously bad readers. Hey, why learn to read if you can look at the pretty pictures? Grrrr.....

Some of the limitations have been well outlined, which is good. Another thing, though, is that people who read tab typically do so because they don't know the names of the notes and where they are on the neck. As a result, when given a suggested fingering in tab that doesn't work for their hand, the player lacks the basic knowledge and skill to find an alternate fingering or position in which to play those notes that might be easier for his/her hand. Or that might just make better sense overall than what the person who tabbed it thought. I have seen some extraordinarily bizaare fingerings in tab that are practically impossible to play that made me ask myself "why in the world wouldn't you just play it *this* way?" A player who doesn't know the notes and where they are on the fretboard is unable to make those decisions. This may be one of the most limiting factors of tab, but one that is way too often overlooked.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Quote by smitherson
Ok I read up to 6.1 and started thinking...whats the point of this. I don't see how this will go into my playing and I don't understand a lot of it

heeeeeeeelp!!!


Exactly what many people think when they start theory learning. Let's see what's in that lesson.

Intervals...you will use these when naming chords, building scales, scale formulas, transcribing songs by ear, and writing your own tunes.

Major scales...music is based on the major scale. Very important

Triads...here's where the chord construction comes into play. Good to know for writing your own material if you need a certain chord. Or if you found a chord and need to find a name for it.

Circle of fifths...for figuring out the notes in the major keys and their relative minors. Helpful for when you need to use a certain scale and when you need to know the notes in a certain key.

Chord construction...shows you what are the different types of chords and how to make them and what they can be used for.

Extending...goes beyond the major, minor, and diminished triads and goes into things like 7th chords.

My point is that all of these are helpful and I, personally, have needed to use everything in that lesson at least one time or another.

If you don't understand something, keep at it until you do. Ask questions as well. It's kind of like math: everything that becomes more complicated is built off of the basics