#1
I have painted a few guitars before by cans. Now I have bought a gravity feed pro paint gun and some lacquer paint. Now, my problem is, when I mix the paint, what is the measurement of paint to lacquer thinner? Is it 1:1 or 1:2 and what does that mean. Equal parts? (Ex: 1/2qt paint, 1/2qt lacquer thinner?) I have no idea what 1:1 means. PLEASE HELP!
Peavey XXX combo *upgraded screen resistors, Tung-Sol's, and 6L6's*
Schecter Syn Std. * modded, scalloped, and worn*
Schecter C-1 Elite *still sexy*
Ibanez AEL 12-string

"He who sticks his dick in peanut butter is fucking nuts"
#2
1:1 is like if u used 1 quart paint you would use 1 quart thinner 1:2 is like 1 quart paint to 2 quarts thinner


but i have absolutly no idea about paint or anything just ratios
Guitars:
Custom les paul copy with sun inlay
Epiphone les paul custom with emg 81/85
Hondo 80's star shape(project)
ESP explorer (project)
Epiphone dr200s
Epiphone ej200
pedals:
mxr doubleshot distortion
amp:
Raven rg100
#4
You don't need to mix thinner with your lacquer unless your gun/compressor can't spray the lacquer, or if it's too thick. All adding thinner does is slow the curing time of the lacquer.

Sometimes if the lacquer is too thick though, you have no choice and you need to add thinner. There are some advantages to using thinner in your mix, such as getting less orange peel & better flowout. It also enables you to use less PSI, but if your compressor is big enough there shouldnt be a problem. A lot of times, i'll use 50-50 lacquer-thinner (or 1:1) on my final coat to help reduce sanding time.

Is your compressor rated for your gun? The compressor should exceed the CFM required by the gun @ a certain PSI.

Chris
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#5
yep listen to algee ... when i mix lacquer my mixtures usually are around 1-1...but every company produces slighty different viscosities of paint.... a good consistency that i learned about a long time ago when i first learned how to air brush was think of 2% milk... it hasnt failed me yet and i go through 10 gallons of un-thinned lacquer a month at work


edit:
algee, i find that when i spray...and i spray A LOT... thinner is used just to thin the paint to a consistency that can be used with the gun...if i want to slow the drying time (say on a hot dry day) i use a retarder... thinner evaporates from the finish leaving lacquer where as a retarder is a chemical reaction... i find less thinner slows the dry time. then again that might just be the characteristics of our paint at work.
Last edited by mutated_riff at Aug 21, 2006,
#6
I'm rather partial to no thinner for the base coats, and then for the last few to make them shiny I like 2:1 lacquer to thinner.

But that's just me.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#7
Thinner is a retarder. It slows drying time even with the medium-speed thinners. Adding retarder is just like adding medium-slow speed retarder in your mix. Thinner will also do the exact same thing as retarder just not to the extent that retarder does. Spraying on high humidity days (which I don't have to anymore) i'd seldom use retarder, i'd use thinner. Accomplishes the same thing. Even if you do get some blushing you can just spray some thinner lightly in the area and it's gone.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
Last edited by AlGeeEater at Aug 22, 2006,