#1
Ok, i was sitting there messing around on my guitar, ran out of stuff to play and sat there thinking. I think came up with the coolest idea ever. Here goes:

You can change the bass, midrange and treble on a signal. What if you could treat the three like separate signals, and then apply different effects to each. Such as: For all notes in the bass range, add an octave lower and give it some rumble. For mid, add chorus and flanger, and maybe some fuzz. For treble notes, make em glassy and add an octave higher.

You could even make it sort of like a gradient of effects, like they overlap so there's not ugly differences between the six notes in a chord. For example: frequencies a,b,c,d have one effect, b,c,d,e have another, and c,d,e,f have another (a being bass, f being treble, and then all the note in between). So they overlap a little to make themselves sound less different.

So gurus, would it work?
#3
You could probably do that with a MIDI instrument (synth guitar!) but I think that otherwise it would be very, very difficult to do.
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#6
Lol your talking about frequency potentiometers and sh1t liek that and you cant upload a picture?


Sorry...go to imageshack.us or some other photo hosting site and upload the file, then post the link it gives you (with the IMG tags) here
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#8
Gibson (or someone) had something like this at a guitar show, I read it in Guitar One or Guitar World, so its been done, I don't know how it worked exactly, but it's still in developmental stages
#9
Ja, there would be way too much change between all the frequencies. It would be like a sudden jump between bass/mid/treble, especially with the octaver(s). I doubt it would work, nor would you probably even want to do this.
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#10
Having some reverb on just the higher frequencies would be cool. It can definately be done. When I get some time (ie. When I start back at uni as opposed to working full time) I'll look at making a device that takes 1 input and seperates in to 3 outputs, called 1to3 (low, med, high) and another that takes 3 inputs and merges them in to 1, called 3to1.

That way you could plug your guitar in to 1to3 and then patch the 3 different outputs in to different effects boxes and then plug those in to 3to1 and finally to your amp.

Can be easily done with band pass filters...

*note* the same sort of thing is already available, as it's used in car sound systems. They take the low frequencies and send to the Sub, High to the tweeters and the rest to the regulars
Last edited by zedar at Aug 22, 2006,
#11
Even if you manage to do that, it would probably sound very bad.
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#12
hmm u could split the cable to 3 different eq petals, set each to all high, low, mid. run effects, then run it finally to 3 different amps..... it would be expensive
...
#13
could you do it where the top 2 strings are one output, the middle 2, and then the bottom 2? i guess like 3 pickups that only get the signal from 2 strings each,
#14
Quote by goalaso08
could you do it where the top 2 strings are one output, the middle 2, and then the bottom 2? i guess like 3 pickups that only get the signal from 2 strings each,


Pickups that only pickup certain strings vibration is probably impossible. A pickup uses magnets to pickup the vibrations so no, it wouldnt work.
#15
That idea sucks hard, but it makes me crave pitch sensitive pickups.
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#16
why does that suck, i think its a pretty sweet consept. You could do little bass lines while hitting the higher strings to put melody with different effects
#17
There are midi pickups that do that, I remember reading about one metal band where one of the guitarists does synth or orchestral lines on his higher strings, and distorted guitar riffs on the lower strings. I think it had the word "hex" pickup in it or something. Oh, and there are effects which work one single frequency band, check out multi-band compressors, which apply a different amount compression to each frequency band. Multi-band distortion could be useful, but I'm not sure about adding modulation or other effects to it, it would just end up muddy and unintelligible.
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#19
I'm sure Jimmy Page was wondering the same thing when he improvised the Stairway solo
#20
Check it out, heres my horribly crappy picture: So those colored lines are like relays that combine frequencies to an extent. So when you play a bass note, you hear an octave down. A bass/mid note and you hear the octave down but its not so loud (it fades). When you play a mid note, you hear whateer effects you applied to it good and loud. Maybe, depending on the relays, you also hear a soft octave up and down. For a mid/treb note, you hear the effects applied to mid and the effects applied to treb, but each is half and half. For a treb note, you hear the treb effects and maybe just a little of the mid effects. So those colored lines have resistors that allow only some of the signal through. To take it one step further and make it even more dynamic and the effects "smoother", You wouldn't just have bass, mid and treble. You would have bass, a little bit more than bass, a little bit more than that, a little bit less than mid, mid, a little bit more than mid etc. until you have the full spectrum of frequencies divided up.

I think this concept would be easy to implement digitally. Piece of cake work that should'vr already been done by line 6 or something. But I think you could also do it analog.
#21
Quote by rockr09
hmm u could split the cable to 3 different eq petals, set each to all high, low, mid. run effects, then run it finally to 3 different amps..... it would be expensive

thats what I was thinking, not to mention the fact that it will probably sound jumbled.
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#22
No matter what note you play on a guitar, its always going to have a mix of bass, mid and treble frequencies. A low E with have more bass and less treble than a high e (and vice versa), but low, mid and high frequencies are present in every note. This means that every note is going to have those 3 effects applied to it, so the effect is never going to be as dramatic as what you are hoping for. If you want different tones and effects for each string, go for a Roland Hex midi pickup with a good controller, that's the only real way to do it
My gear;

Custom HSS Strat (eBay'ed parts)
Fender Acoustic
DOD EQ
EH Big Muff
Home-made Wah
Home-made Booster
Laney LC15

Looking for a Jazz Bass body to refinish

My DeviantArt Page, MySpace Profile
#23
What threadstarter describes is easily possibly using a digital processor. The problem is, it would be way expensive and you'd probably have to program it yourself in assembly. (or write/find a compiler for your DSP chip). It's really not practical.

Edit: Using regular pickups and a regular amp.
#24
ive seen some kinda midi like synth effect pedal that does something like that, it divides the neck into sections and each section u can assign a different effect
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