#1
For the past couple of months I've been looking for a new guitar to buy, and I've narrowed it down to the Ibanez RG1570, but the more I've been thinking about it, the more it seems like a bad idea because of the trem.

I'm wasn't really to fussed about the trem at first, I mean, I thought it would be cool to pull of a few little tricks with it now and then, but I've heard that It's not really worth it unless I'm using it constantly.
I heard it's a real pain if you change tunings alot, the only tunings I really use are standard and drop D, will this be a problem? How long would it take to change the tuning?

I heard its a problem for those who palm mute alot, which I do, is this true?
I also heard that it can snap strings quite easily because of knife edges or something like that Sorry, I'm a bit of a noob when it comes to trems (whiles I'm on the subject, if someone could explain what knife edges actually are and whats so special about ball bearing trems I would apreciate it greatly).

And last but not least whiles I was playing an Ibanez RG1570, the trem seemed to be very loose, as in, the strings would change pitch (not much though) as if I was gently pulling on the whammy bar, just by moving about whiles playing the guitar, is this normal for trems or was the one I was playing just dodgy, and if I was to buy one and it was like that, could it be easily fixed?

Sorry for all the questions, I just really would like to know.

Thanks in advance
#2
It's very easy to fix the bridge so that doesn't have to stop you from buying what you want. Yes Palm muting can be a problem if you palm mute heavely and yes the tremolo snaps string alot if you use it, but that woun't happen if you get it fixed.
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#3
it wont take long to change tuning because of a little trick:
normally when you tune up with the nut unlocked you set the fine tuners in the middle pos. but for low E set it further in. Then once the nut is locked, you can easily reach D by unwinding the fine tuner. Simple pimple.
And about the loose trem, when not using the whammy bar it should be pushed to facing backwrds to stop that exact thing happening. Knife edges are sharp bits that break strings and should not be on any guitar except a cheap trem and can be filed out easily.
The ball bearing trems are found mostly on the Ibanez S series, and are called for them the ZR tremolo, or zero resistance. They are not like a conventional floyd and are sometimes said to be a little smoother but I haven't done a massive playtest so idk.

Hope that helps a little if at all

JM
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#4
Quote by J.MitMetallica
it wont take long to change tuning because of a little trick:
normally when you tune up with the nut unlocked you set the fine tuners in the middle pos. but for low E set it further in. Then once the nut is locked, you can easily reach D by unwinding the fine tuner. Simple pimple.
And about the loose trem, when not using the whammy bar it should be pushed to facing backwrds to stop that exact thing happening. Knife edges are sharp bits that break strings and should not be on any guitar except a cheap trem and can be filed out easily.
The ball bearing trems are found mostly on the Ibanez S series, and are called for them the ZR tremolo, or zero resistance. They are not like a conventional floyd and are sometimes said to be a little smoother but I haven't done a massive playtest so idk.

Hope that helps a little if at all

JM

Sorry to say but all of that is wrong, 'cept about the ZR trem perhaps. Tuning a floyd rose to a drop D couldnt happen just by loosening the fine tuners, it doesnt work that way, you gotta reset the trem back by adjusting the spring tension and retune.

And knife edges is this thing

Knife edges are the things that kept your bridge in place when you're diving up or down.

it doesnt cause your strings to break, you probably meant "SHARP SADDLES" which needed to be sanded down to smooth it, but with Edge Pro, you wont have this problem.

To answer your question TS, so far i've never encountered problems palm muting strings with Floyd Rose equipped guitars, the spring tension will fight back, even if you push it down really hard, it doesnt go flat like the whole step, just a few cents. And the Edge Pro is very very smooth, prior to good setup, its great, as opposed to stiffer cheap LFRs out there.

Simply put, if you use trem a lot, buy this, if you just use it for simple vibratos or seldomly, get a fixed.
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Last edited by madpickin03 at Aug 23, 2006,
#5
Quote by madpickin03
Simply put, if you use trem a lot, buy this, if you just use it for simple vibratos or seldomly, get a fixed.


But the problem is I'm not sure whether I would use it alot or not, because my current guitar doesn't have one, so I can't really say if you know what I mean, thats why I'm wondering if its worth the hassel or not.
#7
I'm literally into anything that uses guitars, blues, funk, rock, metal, country and many many more, though I guess I mostly play metal
#8
Do you change tunings often? if you do, then a floyd rose bridge isnt probably the best for you. Its really up to you, you gotta decide it yourself, but if you want to start learning how to dive and whatnot, the RG1570 is a very very good guitar.
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#9
Okay, so here's the deal. I just got myself one of these a while ago, and it's an absolutely incredible guitar to play on.

I don't use the trem all that much, mostly for a vibrato, and the occational dive, or crazy harmonic, any more than that (for me, and my particular tastes at least) descends into the realms of wanking. So I'd say it's still more than worth it regardless of how much you use the bar. Of course it depends what kind of guitar you're playing now too. If you've already got a guitar of similar quality, with few difference except the trem then no it's not really worth it.

Palm muting can make the guitar flat, but honestly if you're playing properly it shouldn't. Your hands should be touching the strings to mute not anchored on them. The trem can also be tightened some to suit your needs.

String bending will also pull the bridge forwards slightly, but that only makes a difference if you do a lot of double stop bends, and even then it's compensated by bending the second string slightly instead of just the one.

String's do tend to break more often than a fixed bridge, but I've yet to have a string break on me, and I use hard picks and I tend to play quite hard. Of course if you do break a string the entire tuning of your guitar gets ****ed.

Alternate tunings.... Drop D can work, but it requires retuning the entire guitar. Any other tuning? Avoid. You pick the tuning you want, you set the guitar up for it, and you keep it. If you want to use other tunings just have your other guitar for that, depending on how dramatically you change the tuning you may have to setup the trem all over again, and make various other changes. It's not fun.

Tuning is indeed a pain in the ass, you basically have to tune each string 6 or more times. First you use your normal tuners, tune your E, then A, then E, A, D, then E, A, D, G... etc.. Lock the nuts, then use the fine tuners for anything else. It's not as horrible a process as it sounds, but certainly nowhere near as easy as a normal guitar. The good thing about the 1570, is that the sucker stays in tune, no matter what you do to it. The only time it won't stay in tune is when you pull back on the bar, it'll always be ever so slightly sharp, but you can compensate for that too just by slightly pushing down on the bar, or bridge and it'll be back where it should be.

Sounds like a horrible pain in the ass doesn't it? It is. However, once you become accustomed to it none of this is nearly as horrible as it sounds. I personally thing that the RG1570 is worth every penny regardless of how much you use the bar. The only reason not to get it would be because of using different tunings. Standard and drop D are fine, but will require about 2-5 minutes to retune, and anything else you simply need another guitar for. So if the majority of the stuff you play is only in those two tuning's then it's not a big deal.