#1
Ok, I've learned all my modes and alot of scales such as major/minor, harmonic minor, natural minor, egyptian, and some hungarian stuff.

I play them everyday just to keep them refreshed in my head. But what can I do to turn them into music?
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#2
first, figure out what chords would best be played under them according to notes and scale degrees...try playing them over different chords, see where they fit and where they don't...from there you can create melodies, riffs, and all that jazz
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by Sharp_as_steel
Axe_grinder pwns!!!!



Member #2 of the "Official UG Teabaggers' Cult". PM Slayer224 to join.
#3
Let me answer with a question, when you say you learned a scale, what exactly does that mean? Can you play it wherever on the neck, with any and all possible fingerings? Do you play them ascending/descending, or did you also learn to play the notes in a random order?
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#4
Quote by Mad Marius
Let me answer with a question, when you say you learned a scale, what exactly does that mean? Can you play it wherever on the neck, with any and all possible fingerings? Do you play them ascending/descending, or did you also learn to play the notes in a random order?


I learned all modes, ionian, dorian, phygrian, lydian, mixolydian, aeolian and locrian, and yes I can play them on different notes. I can play them ascending and descending.

I found different positions for modes as well, such as ionian according to the WWHWWWH pattern in accordance with the other modes.

I bought a book. lol called the GUITAR GRIMORE; scales and modes
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#6
Quote by SagaciousChild
Just play them silly.

Use your brain...it's not that hard.


what do u mean? I don't know what to do, I just play scales, I want to put them in use now. That is what I'm asking for.

How do I put these scales and modes in use?
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#8
Quote by SagaciousChild
Play them in a different order.


Can you please expand on that?

-because playing them in a different order may mess up the WWHWWWH order of modes/scales
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#9
Improvise
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#10
^Yeh.

All you have to do is play it. Just play man.

Memorizing scale patterns is pointless unless you can improvise with it.
No fucking images.

Ghey.
#11
ok, listen to me, you know all your keys? From E all the way to D#? so, then say you find a guitar jam track that is in the key of A, well the A is on the 5th fret, so lets say you choose to play the minor pentatonic, in the key of A use that scale and mix up the notes and if you know all your positions expand your playing up and down the neck, simple as that. ask me if you need any more help
#12
I didn't know something like that had to be TAUGHT.

It's fairly natural.
No fucking images.

Ghey.
#13
Quote by SagaciousChild
I didn't know something like that had to be TAUGHT.

It's fairly natural.




SagaciousChild, quit being such a jackass.

Anyway, to the original poster: To provide you some insight, I'll pick a random mode, lets say Lydian. A common Lydian progression is I-II-IV-I. From a quick google search, Eight Days A Week and You Won't See Me by the Beatles (apparently, I didn't listen to verify I've got other music I want to listen to right now ) are both in Lydian. Listen to them. The key to understanding the uses of the modes really rests a lot in listening to music that uses that particular mode, to give you a good idea for chords and melody lines to work with.

Anyway, make a recording of the chords in loop, or find some program to do it for you, and play the Lydian mode along with it. Figure out the nuances of what works over each chord, what transitions sound musical and make sense, etc. For example, I've found that when playing in Dorian if I come from below when approaching 'home' in the progression and hit that natural 6, the -i- chord doesn't resolve nearly as well as when coming from above.

Another minor key example is (i-vi-v-i) for Aeolian.

Another thing which you seem to know but I see mistaken a lot and feel is worth mentioning. Playing in a certain mode is NOT simply a 'starting point' and 'ending point', it's a way of describing musical phrases, songs, etc. You'd be playing in E dorian, for example, if the notes you're playing are E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D, and you tend to accentuate and 'land' on the notes E, G, and B; and your chord progression resolves to a E minor chord or some variation (Like Em7).

Edit: (Yea, Em, not D )


Slurgi
Last edited by Slurgi at Aug 24, 2006,
#14
Quote by Slurgi
and your chord progression resolves to a D minor chord or some variation (Like Dm7).
Woah, hang on, that doesn't sound right. Explain that again.
#15
Say you are on your A string...and the scale you are using, contains the frets, 0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12...you just play those notes only, in any order, and they will sound fine, with any other chord with the root note of 0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12...
Gear:
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser w/ EMG 81-85 Humbuckers
Peavey 6505+
Mesa/Boogie Rectifier 4x12 Slant Cab w/Vintage 30's
BBE Sonic Stomp
Boss TU-2
Boss NS-2
Boss DD-7
Danelectro Fish N' Chips EQ
#16
Quote by ThisFireBurns22
with any other chord with the root note of 0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12...
That is an incorrect statement. You couldn't play that scale over C minor.
#17
in terms of just turning scales into music... write riffs. get a melody in your head, or build one by improvising. it can be simple or complex. know what mode you're playing, and try to make creative use of the notes which define the mode. for example, if you're playing a riff using notes from A harmonic minor, fiddle around with where and when you play the G#, as that's the note that makes the scale differ from the normal minor scale.

one you have a basic riff or melody, you can use your knowledge of playing in key to choose some chords to play for a second part, and then it just starts going from there. the more you write, the better you get.

basically, make up music however it comes to you, and apply theory as you go. if it sounds good, it IS good, so worry about theory second after how something sounds.
#18
scale sequencings a good exercise plus soloing tool.
Youtube covers

[url="http://www.youtube.com/user/MrJumboHumbo[/URL"]
#19
My suggestion is to watch "Melodic Control" by Marty Friedman. He explains how to improvise over chords. And it makes sense to someone who already knows the basics.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#20
Quote by Slurgi


SagaciousChild, quit being such a jackass.

Anyway, to the original poster: To provide you some insight, I'll pick a random mode, lets say Lydian. A common Lydian progression is I-II-IV-I. From a quick google search, Eight Days A Week and You Won't See Me by the Beatles (apparently, I didn't listen to verify I've got other music I want to listen to right now ) are both in Lydian. Listen to them. The key to understanding the uses of the modes really rests a lot in listening to music that uses that particular mode, to give you a good idea for chords and melody lines to work with.

Anyway, make a recording of the chords in loop, or find some program to do it for you, and play the Lydian mode along with it. Figure out the nuances of what works over each chord, what transitions sound musical and make sense, etc. For example, I've found that when playing in Dorian if I come from below when approaching 'home' in the progression and hit that natural 6, the -i- chord doesn't resolve nearly as well as when coming from above.

Another minor key example is (i-vi-v-i) for Aeolian.

Another thing which you seem to know but I see mistaken a lot and feel is worth mentioning. Playing in a certain mode is NOT simply a 'starting point' and 'ending point', it's a way of describing musical phrases, songs, etc. You'd be playing in E dorian, for example, if the notes you're playing are E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D, and you tend to accentuate and 'land' on the notes E, G, and B; and your chord progression resolves to a D minor chord or some variation (Like Dm7).


Slurgi


I understand everything you said except about the common Lydian progression which is I-II-IV-I and the Aeolian progression of I-VI-V-I.

What are these? lol don't flame
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Woah, hang on, that doesn't sound right. Explain that again.


I think he meant some variation of Em...

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
A chord progression is what makes up every song basically. Like the chord progression for knocking on heavens door for example would be G D C. Which is I-V-IV.

I-II-IV-I in the key of C major for example would be C-D-F-C. Just replace the roman numeral with the corresponding note from that key, and then you have your root notes for the chords.

C Major
I-1-C
II-2-D
III-3-E
IV-4-F
V-5-G
VI-6-A
VII-7-B

C Minor
I-1-C
II-2-D
III-3-Eb
IV-4-F
V-5-G
VI-6-Ab
VII-7-Bb

I'm pretty sure that's what you wanted to know from the post above.

For putting your scales into songs, there are a few ways to do it. What I like to do is play through scales untill I find one that has a feeling to it that I like. Then make a Chord progression like I-II-IV-I. After that I like to record that/or find a program that will play that looped over and over again. Then from the original scale that I first chose I start just playing small bits off riffs that I get in my head for each chord change and then just play them out on my guitar. Once i've found a the riffs for each chord change that I really like and have worked them into the key, I put them together using other small riffs that will make it sound better going from one chord to the next. Thats the melody. Then I just go from there righting riffs based on that melody for the verse. Then I just go from there figuring out the rest of the song.

Hope it helped.
Quote by DispsablePuppet
So I was at the store the other day... and your all gay.

#23
Quote by mEtAlORc
I understand everything you said except about the common Lydian progression which is I-II-IV-I and the Aeolian progression of I-VI-V-I.

What are these? lol don't flame


In any given key, you can build chords off of each note. In the key of A, for instance, your notes are A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G# and A. Typically the chords built off of the 1st, 4th, and 5th notes are major, and are hence, given upper case roman numerals.

So...
I = A
IV = D
V = E

Typically the chords built off of the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th notes are minor, and are hence, recognized in lower case roman numerals.

ii - Bm
iii - C#m
vi - F#m

Typically, the chord built off of the seventh scale degree is diminished, which is made up of minor thirds, so is also given lower case designation

vii - G#dim

So, a progression of I-II-IV-I, let's say in the key of C, would be:
C (made up of notes C,E,G)
D (made up of notes D,F#,A)
F (made up of notes F,A,C)
C

The notes in a C lydian scale are C, D, E, F#, G, A, B, C.

If you were to play a ii chord (in this case, Dm), there would be notes that wouldn't work against the F# in the melody. You would change the chord to D major (a II chord now, right!), which is made up of D,F#,A to reflect the notes you're using in your melody.

Using a V chord ( in this case, G major) would also work well, as the notes in the chord (G,B, D) are all also found in the scale you are basing your melody on. You would just have to avoid the temptation of using a V7 chord (G7 here) as the F found in the G7 chord may well sound funny. Perhaps a Gmaj7 (notes G,B,D,F#) would sound nice....

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#24
You guys have helped me out a lot! Thank you.
Larrivée D-03R
US Fender Telecaster, Vox AC15
#25
Quote by mEtAlORc
Ok, I've learned all my modes and alot of scales such as major/minor, harmonic minor, natural minor, egyptian, and some hungarian stuff.

I play them everyday just to keep them refreshed in my head. But what can I do to turn them into music?


put them in solos, and make people's jaws drop from your amazing shredding silly!