#1
What scales am I to use over these chord progressions if I want to write a solo? and why if possible...

D-A-Am-E-G

D-C-A#-A
I can speak German. Ha.
#2
the 1st one is C major or A minor, because a chord progression always follows two scales: the major and the minor scales. so first you find what scales the chord roots lie in. they all lie in C major. then, the enharmonic minor(minor scale linked to a major scale which is always the second scale) is A minor. you can then follow suit with the second progression, whichis in F major. the enharmonic minor of f major is A#minor. by the way, an enharmonic minor is always the fifth note of the scale, which is always 7 semitones up. sorry about the long amounts of music theory in there.
#3
Aha..I think i get that, so the scales are (respectively) Cm/Am and F/A#m. So all I have to do is check each scale for all the roots of the chords, and if one of them has all the root notes in them, then thats the scale thatll fit to it? Thx for the tip with the fifth note...

And what scale specifically, Cmajor ore C pentatonic? Anything that feels good I guess...
I can speak German. Ha.
#4
Quote by Ary

And what scale specifically, Cmajor ore C pentatonic? Anything that feels good I guess...


Yeah, It's your music, use what you think sounds best and what sounds most like what you would play.
#5
yep. you've got the chord prog thing. i would recommend using a major or minor normal, and not a pentatonic scale, as your rhythm is not in power chord. however, it is personal taste. also I like to use the arpeggios as roots for solos
#6
well acually the second progression is powerchorded, the fisrt one just normal open chords, but thx for everything.
I can speak German. Ha.
#7
Quote by darkadav
the 1st one is C major or A minor, because a chord progression always follows two scales: the major and the minor scales. so first you find what scales the chord roots lie in. they all lie in C major. then, the enharmonic minor(minor scale linked to a major scale which is always the second scale) is A minor. you can then follow suit with the second progression, whichis in F major. the enharmonic minor of f major is A#minor. by the way, an enharmonic minor is always the fifth note of the scale, which is always 7 semitones up. sorry about the long amounts of music theory in there.


Whoa! A couple of corrections here....most of this is wildly inaccurate.

Enharmonic equivalents are the sort of thing where two notes are the same but given two different names. C# and Db are considered enharmonic equivalents.

The *relative* minor of A major is F# minor; the *relative* minor of F major is D minor. Always three frets away.

I've never heard of an enharmonic minor relationship. Using the above example, the fifth note of an F major scale would be C if it is always five notes up. If you're thinking five semitones (ie. frets), that is a perfect fourth, which in F major would be Bb (then enharmonic equivalent of A#) but there is no major/minor relationship between those two notes.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
no problem. i was really rubbish actually. i still can't remember a scale without a guitar in my hand and playing it
#9
lol ok...but the scales u told me are correct are they?
I can speak German. Ha.
#10
yep. they work. chris i think is confused by my wording, as i am not very good at musical wording. he is however correct in the fact that enharmonic minors are not correct but are relative minors. 7 semitones is always a fifth, hence a powerchord has a root note and a fifth SEVEN SEMITONES away chris. also that is used to switch between minor and major scales for the purposes of rhythm work, and also solo work.
#11
these major/ minor switches are pretty much useless for you, however, as you are playing lead, and so you won't need to switch between major and minor. however, he is right that if you switch from a MINOR to MAJOR, not major to minor, it is 3 semitones down.
#12
Quote by Ary
What scales am I to use over these chord progressions if I want to write a solo? and why if possible...

D-A-Am-E-G

D-C-A#-A


There is no easy answer here, as you have a real dog's breakfast of chords here.

In the first section, you have:
D - (D, F#, A)
A - (A, C#, E)
Am - (A, C, E)
E - (E, G#, B)
G - (G, B, D)

so sometimes you have the C sharped, and sometimes you don't. Sometimes you have the G sharped, and sometimes you don't. If you put all the notes in order you get something like this....

D, E, F#, G, G#, A, B, C, C#, D.

This looks like a mixture of D blues using the G# passing tone between the G and A:

D, F, G, G#, A, C, D

and the D major scale

D, E, F#, G, A, B, C, D

Given that, It would depend on which chords you used most often, but I'd probably start with D major and bring in elements of D blues (yeah, pentatonic minor) during the parts where you are using an Am and E major chords.

**this all assumes your root note is D**

In the second part you have:
D (D, F#, A)
C (C, E, G)
A (A, C#, E)
Bb - here is the enharmonic equivalent of A# - (Bb, D, F)

again, another dog's breakfast of chords and notes.

Line them all up in order, with D as your root, and you get:

D, E, F, F#, G, A, Bb, C, C#, D

You could use a D melodic minor which would be:

D E F G A B C D - ascending
D E F, G, A, Bb, C, D - descending

... but this might be complicated, and you'd have to shift to some form of D major for when you are on a D major chord.

Alternately, you could center your melody around D major ( which seems more closely suited to the key you are in), and shift to some variant of D minor for your C and Bb (aka A#) chords.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by darkadav
these major/ minor switches are pretty much useless for you, however, as you are playing lead, and so you won't need to switch between major and minor. however, he is right that if you switch from a MINOR to MAJOR, not major to minor, it is 3 semitones down.


C major = A minor = three semitones down
A minor = C major = three semitones up

Seven semitones, (ie. a perfect fifth) won't get you anything. To keep this simple, let's look at this:

C = C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

now go up seven semitones... takes you to G....

G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G

Not any sort of equivalent scale. Not minor at all. If you kill the F#, and go:
G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G

then you have merely found a G mixolyidian mode... but still "major" in nature.

When you are playing lead, you are playing a melody over a chord progression (typically), which means that you *have to* switch between major and minor scales, or mixing up different modes within your solo if the chord progression requires it. Otherwise, you'll find your melodic notes clashing with the harmonic structure. Of course.... some of the coolest things happen when you break the rules, so your ear will be the final judge.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
ok im really confused here. im gna make a pass on this 1, my scales looked like they would work via my method, but u seem to understand alot more about this so i'm leavin it to yew
#15
Its the sixth of the scale which gives you the relative minor/Aoelian mode!
Not the fifth but strangely enough you did mention the correct chords???
Sack your guitar/music teacher and PLEASE STOP POSTING WHEN YOU DONT KNOW WHAT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT AS IT DOES MORE HARM THAN GOOD!!!