#1
Well I've finally got hired as a guitar teacher, and I know the just of what to start with, I mean... basic theory, scales, warmups, stuff like that. It's a beginner class, mind you.

But what else should I teach? It's halfhour lessons. I plan on asking questions about what genres they enjoy, how long they've played, previous teachers, stuff like that. But if there's anything else it would be warmly welcomed and thanked.

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#2
Cmon, nobody has a single idea of what to teach? I gotta start in an hour and I'm afraid I'll run outta material that soon.
I'm a social drinker. When someone says "I'll have a drink." I say "So shall I!"
#4
Simple scale stuff. Like going up and down the neck. Finger strength with that. After, I'd think power chords. Then open chords, then barre chords. Thats how I did it but I never really had a teacher hah
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#5
Teach them everything you know...hopefully that WILL take a while
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#6
Lmao. So you think basically running them through scales and teaching the notes on the E and A is a good first lesson and will take half hour?
I'm a social drinker. When someone says "I'll have a drink." I say "So shall I!"
#7
Quote by Anti Ginger Kid
Lmao. So you think basically running them through scales and teaching the notes on the E and A is a good first lesson and will take half hour?


Yeah, because next lesson they'll never remember it so theres another half an hour lesson
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#8
1st off id imagine general stuff about the guitar. posture, how to fret notes(using baseball grip (thumb over the neck tech), or thumb behind the neck etc. lotta notty gritty stuff like that but very important is a good way to start. basic open position chords until they can play the cleanly etc. hammer on tech, pull off tech, diff picking styles, fly, economy, sweep,alternate etc. warm ups: left hand, and right hand, then sync both (anyone see patterns here from john petrucci and troy stetina books????).
theres tonnes of stuff, i really cant type it all out! lol

ask them if they have any preference, find out where they wana go with playin guitar, what styles they are interested in. perhaps even intro them to dif styles they wudnt normally give time. scales, arps, tappin, tricks(such as reverse bends, notes off the fretboard , blah blah blah) do lesson on typical styles of certain players.

millions of things to teach!!!!............over a period of time obviously! not all that in one hour! pmsl

best of luck man, i would love to teach, but im cant teach anywhere, no transport
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Last edited by graw81 at Aug 24, 2006,
#9
Quote by La Qotsa
Yeah, because next lesson they'll never remember it so theres another half an hour lesson


w00t! Yay for screwing people out of money!

EDIT: also thanks for everybodys responses.
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#10
Quote by Anti Ginger Kid
w00t! Yay for screwing people out of money!


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#11
I would probably try and teach them how to play something simple by a band that they're really into, it's all very well playing scales etc, but nothing beats the buzz of learning one of your favourite tunes, it's very good for motivation.
#12
Well I wouldn't teach them scales in the first lesson. In my opinion a teacher should first ask, "What do you know about notes?" Then I would show them how to hold a pick, proper thumb placement. Then how to fret notes and pluck them. Start on the high E string. Teach E, F, and G. Then move down the strings. Then teach sharps and flats.

then move on from there learning simple songs. then let them learn songs they want.
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#13
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Well I wouldn't teach them scales in the first lesson. In my opinion a teacher should first ask, "What do you know about notes?" Then I would show them how to hold a pick, proper thumb placement. Then how to fret notes and pluck them. Start on the high E string. Teach E, F, and G. Then move down the strings. Then teach sharps and flats.

then move on from there learning simple songs. then let them learn songs they want.


Well yes. Absolutely technique comes first, but I can send them home at least with a couple scales so they can learn, and bring it to me next week. For sure I'd teach songs, but I don't play much a beginner would be into, so I'd have to see what song they want, then get it for them next week, my ear isn't the best at this point in time.
I'm a social drinker. When someone says "I'll have a drink." I say "So shall I!"
#14
Quote by Anti Ginger Kid
Well yes. Absolutely technique comes first, but I can send them home at least with a couple scales so they can learn, and bring it to me next week. For sure I'd teach songs, but I don't play much a beginner would be into, so I'd have to see what song they want, then get it for them next week, my ear isn't the best at this point in time.

well by simple songs first I mean like Jingle Bells, Ode To Joy, **** like that.........before all your students want to dive into drop d and poppy crap
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#15
To be honest... I've never attempted learning Jingle Bells. I'll teach them songs that they want to know, it's so much more fun and rewarding that way.
I'm a social drinker. When someone says "I'll have a drink." I say "So shall I!"
#16
Mr.Songwriter is dead right about learning one of their fav riffs or whatever. forgot to mention that in my last post. its always good for a student to go home even if its only the one riff, they`ll be much happies than knowing a bunch of notes, which they WILL forget 10mins later.
after they get over that they can play a riff or two, get down to business with the nitty gritty.
#17
Quote by Anti Ginger Kid
To be honest... I've never attempted learning Jingle Bells. I'll teach them songs that they want to know, it's so much more fun and rewarding that way.

If you can't figure out Jingle Bells from memory or ear (just the melody mind you) I think you should reevaluate your qualification as a teacher.
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#18
teach whatever you want, theyre begginers, they wont know if its wrong or not.

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#19
^classic

make sure they have good technique. Hammer the **** out of any of them that attempt to chicken out of using their pinky. Make sure their wrist posture's good.

Explain the basics of music theory (IE there are only twelve notes, but these occur at different pitches - start RIGHT at the start) and do open chords before anything else. If any show promise with the C D G A and E chords, show them F and laugh in their face.
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#20
Make sure to try to enforce alternate picking and using their pinky. If they don't learn now it'll be harder to after learning all downpicking and not using their 4th finger. They won't get it at first, obviously, but they'll become better. This is probably not something you'll worry about in the first lesson but when you get into songs.
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