#1
Help me understand this:

Gmajor scale 1st position r=root note
|-----------------------------------------2--3--5--------------------|
|-----------------------------------3--5-----------------------------|
|--------------------------2--4--5-----------------------------------|
|-----------------2--4--5--------------------------------------------|
|--------2--3--5-----------------------------------------------------|
|--3--5--------------------------------------------------------------|
r r r
2 4 1 2 4 2 3 4 1 3 4 2 4 1 2 4
----------fingers used (optional)-------------

I?m trying to learn these scales form high voltages? ?Scales For Beginners?.
I don?t know what it all means.
First off am I reading the tab right. First you place 2nd finger on the 6th string on 3rd fret and 4th finger on the 6th string on 5th fret. What I?m confused about isn?t G Major chord this:



Is there a difference between chords and scales?
Also what does the ?root note? mean?
And what is meant by ?1st position??

Any help would be much appreciated.

Cheers
Bill
#2
a chord is a bunch of notes right, you got major and minor, these are taken from major and minor scales respectively.

Root note refers to the key of the music (typically you will start off on this note). For music to stay in key, you will have to play a given scale of a given chord or it will sound like ****.

1st position is basically that....the first pattern of notes your fingers will follow on the scale because remember scales move up and down the neck.
#3
sorry, you will have to play a certain scale over a given chord for it to sound right.
#4
Also, correct me if I'm wrong, knowledgable people, a chord typically contains the root (1st) 3rd and 5th notes o a scale, though often multiple times at different octaves.
#5
That is correct yes, and the minor has a b3 (flat third)

C Major triad: C, E, G
C Minor triad: C, Eb, G
#6
Think I need to get myself a theory book. I'm a little confused as to what you guys mean. Any advice on some website or books that u can recomend.
#7
I'm repeating some stuff other people have said but figured I'll answer all your questions in one post.

A scale is a set of tones. A chord is 2 or more notes played simaltaneously. 2 notes played together is known as a diad or, more commonly in the guitar-world, a double-stop. Chords really start to obtain their flavor at 3 notes (called triads). A major triad is the most basic type of major chord. It consists of the root, the major 3rd of the root, and the 5th of the root. So a G major triad is G, B, D. Now look at the G-major chord in that picture. From the low e string up the notes are [G, B, D, G, D, G]. Notice how the chord is only made up of the three notes in the G major triad?

Minor triads are the same as major triads except the major 3rd (4 semitones above the root) is replaced by a minor 3rd, or flat 3rd (3 semitones above the root)

This only scrapes the surface of basic music theory.

As far as positions. When someone says play in 1st position, it means you should play so that your index finger is anchored over the strings at the first fret. Another example, 7th position (or VII) means you play with your index finger anchored over the 7th fret (although you can stretch that finger back to play notes at the 6th fret occasionally). For some reason the "official" word on positions is that the name of the position you play in corresponds to the fret below your 2nd finger so your second finger would be above the 8th fret in 7th position or the 2nd fret in 1st position, etc etc.
Gibson SG Standard
Orange Rocker 30 combo
Fulltone OCD
EH Holy Grail
Last edited by rockxwl at Aug 24, 2006,
#8
Quote by rockxwl
A major triad is the most basic type of major chord. It consists of the root, the major 3rd of the root, and the 5th of the root. .


By major 3rd of the root you mean the 3rd fret is the root of G as well as the 5th fret.

Quote by rockxwl
So a G major triad is G, B, D.


Is this why we don't hold down these strings when we playthe G chord

Quote by rockxwl
Now look at the G-major chord in that picture. From the low e string up the notes are [G, B, D, G, D, G]. Notice how the chord is only made up of the three notes in the G major triad?


Am I reading this right the strings start with the fat one- [G, B, D, G, D, G].
If so how are the 3 stings that you play open not giveing you the note that these strings are D G B.

I'm sorry for being such a noob I have only started playing the guitar 2 days ago but I also want to learn theroy as well.

Cheers
#9
No problem man. Everyone here was once a 2-day guitar n00b. I'll try to explain the answers to your questions as quickly as possible but that will be all for this thread. This forum isn't a space for private lessons.

Roots. All chords have a name (ie. G major, A minor, Db diminished, etc). Notice that each chords name begins with a letter. That letter is the ROOT of the chord, meaning all of the other notes in the chord are to be read in relation to that note.

When I said a triad is the root, the 3rd, and the 5th, those numbers do NOT refer to the fret numbers but to the quality of the interval between the root and the other note. Two notes that are a major third apart are seperated by 4 semi-tones (or halfsteps, or frets on the guitar). On the low E string (the thickest), a G note is sounded by pressing down on the 3rd fret. If you go from the 3rd fret and slide your finger up (meaning towards the body of the guitar) 4 frets you will arrive at the 7th fret on the same string. That note is B. However, you can't play two notes on the same string at the same time, but thankfully due to the way a guitar is tuned, the 2nd fret on the A string (2nd thickest) is the same exact note as the 7th fret on the low-E string. This is all probably sounding pretty confusing to you, no worries. It'll all start becoming clear over time as you continue to study theory and guitar and learn how to apply the two to each other. Needless to say, the first thing you need to do is learn which frets on which strings sound which notes.

Your second question. Yes, that is why the G, B, and D strings are not held down. Because when they ring open they make the correct tones. However, the fingering that I was referring to before is slightly different. The way many people finger an open G chord is they also fret the 3rd fret on the B string (second thinnest) which sounds yet another D note. Either fingering (that way or the one pictured) is perfectly fine.
Gibson SG Standard
Orange Rocker 30 combo
Fulltone OCD
EH Holy Grail
#10
Thanks rockxwl that cleared up a lot of confusion. I really appreciate your patience with me. Now I see the frets in a different way. Thanks again and to everyone who has helped answer my questions on other posts.

Cheers