#1
I've aquired minor callouses, learned two songs and about 16 diffefrent riffs, and am wondering how long it will be before I develope any talent...anybody know how long it will be before I can call myself an artist?
#2
Lol.

That all depends on how much you play. Could take a few months. Could take a few years.

The more time you put in everyday, the faster you'll become really good.
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#3
^yep
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#4
don't take this the wrong way, but i think talent is inherent in that either you have it or you don't, however ability can definately be learned and depending on how far you want to progress and how good you are, to reach whatever level you'd like to reach may take another week or it may take the rest of your life.
#5
wow, that would really suck. Actually I have put almost all of my time into it lately. I riffed and practiced for about 8 hours yesterday, and my fingers are killing me today, so I decided to take a break. I just hope to one day form a band.
#6
I personally believe there is only one type of real talent. And that talent is to have the determination to keep on playing and keep questioning your own ability and how to improve that. And it seems to me that you have that.
#7
Try not to rush yourself either. Go at your own pace and take things as slowly or quickly as you need to.

As said, it's different for everyone and the time it takes to achieve your goal(s) depends on what you want to achieve in your playing.

But remember to have fun though
#8
The one thing about playing guitar is the more you learn about it, the less you
realize you know. When I first started I was playing in clubs with guitar and
harmonica whithin a year and I thought I was the best thing since Bob Dylan. That was 25 years ago. I'm still playing and learning. I now realize that even though I
thought I was good and everone told me I was - I didn't know S**t back then.
#9
Bobdrick, that's exactly what I meant. If you're putting in eight hours daily, you'll be better than many 3-year players within 4-6 weeks.

As for talent being natural - No way! If you work hard, talent will come to you easy. Kind of like luck, in a way - you make your own talent, just as you make your own luck.
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#10
dont practice for more than 3 hours a day, thats when u lose ur social life and lose all chance of ever getting in a band.
#11
thanks for all the replies guys. I really am trying to take guitar as seriously as possible. Mostly Because the guys I hang out with have been playing for so much longer.

Do you guys have any suggestions on chord transition smotthing, becasue that is seems to be one of the most important parts. Thanks so much for the help so far!


Oh, about the 8 hours yesterday, it was just because I was home alone all day with nothing better to do. Not that I am a loser. Pff. LOL.

I was also having a horrible time with barre chords. I have no trouble holding them down, but the rest of the chord is so hard to fret. It really messes up my speed. Anyone have a method they used? Should I get a capo?
Last edited by Bobdrick at Aug 25, 2006,
#12
practice transition between all the open chords and do it is fast and cleanly as u can and then it becomes as easy as breathing
#13
Quote by Bobdrick
thanks for all the replies guys. I really am trying to take guitar as seriously as possible. Mostly Because the guys I hang out with have been playing for so much longer.

Do you guys have any suggestions on chord transition smotthing, becasue that is seems to be one of the most important parts. Thanks so much for the help so far!


Oh, about the 8 hours yesterday, it was just because I was home alone all day with nothing better to do. Not that I am a loser. Pff. LOL.


My tip for chord transition is to just practice it. You'll hear it a lot, but practicing is the only way to solve your problems 9/10 times. When you've got your chord held down, try to pick all the notes separately to see if theres any note that's either muted or wrong.
#14
I can play them clearly, just...take me a while to move to the next one.

Especially with the barre chords...
#15
Quote by JoHNNERz
Bobdrick, that's exactly what I meant. If you're putting in eight hours daily, you'll be better than many 3-year players within 4-6 weeks.

As for talent being natural - No way! If you work hard, talent will come to you easy. Kind of like luck, in a way - you make your own talent, just as you make your own luck.


i disagree, i've known guitarists that have ability but no talent (like they can play great, but can't write a song to save their life and wouldn't know where to start if they had to) and like wise i've known people that have talent and no ability at all, a friend of mine isn't too great at playing but he can write out on sheet music an excellent song.
#16
and yes practice practice practice, i think it took me about 2 weeks to get decent chord movements down so that it was nice and clean and i was playing about what you are, but the premise of it is to get it down to muscle memory so that you don't even need to think about where to go, your hands do it naturally.
#17
For chord transitions: buy a metronome (if you don't already have one). Put it on a moderately slow tempo, and do a chord, hold for four beats, then switch. Gradually up the tempo until you get comfortable with it. This works with finger speed for scales and such too.
As for how long it'll take you to get good: practise, of course. But also try to learn some theory. I played for alomst a year and got absolutely nowhere, but once I began to learn scales and theory, I got a lot better. You'll be able to not only play the things you want, but understand WHY they work, and it'll make you a better musician all around.
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