#1
So, I looked through SD's lesson on how to find out which chords are in which key, and it made a lot of sense (great lesson!), but it left me with a question:
He described how to build each chord by using the scale of the key and putting sharps/flats where appropriate, then revealed that the pattern of major/minor chords is always the same: major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished. This makes sense to me.
But he adds that this only works for the major scale. (Hence, as I was trying to figure out the chords for the minor scale as I was reading it, what I found doesn't work). Is there a different pattern if it's a minor key?
"He has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original."
--Alice Cooper, on Marilyn Manson.
#3
Well let's take the A minor key.

A B C D E F G

Now, if you build a triad in thirds on each note, you get this.

A C E
B D F
C E G
D F A
E G B
F A C
G B D

Now, if you look at the intervals between notes, you can find out which chords are minor, major and diminished.

I'll go through 4 of them.

A C E

A to C is a minor third. A to E is a perfect fifth. Minor triad

B D F

B to D is a minor thid. B to F is a diminished fifth. Diminished triad

C E G

C to E is a major third. C to G is a perfect fifth. Major triad

E G B

E to G is a minor third. E to B is a perfect fifth. Minor triad

So do that all together and you get...

i-ii-III-iv-v-VI-VII

EDIT:

Hehe
#4
As johnjones showed, you just make your starting chord the vi chord. vi becomes i, vii becomes ii, I becomes III, etc.
Looking for my India/Django.
#5
Wicked...thanks all...
"He has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original."
--Alice Cooper, on Marilyn Manson.
#6
I	II	III	IV	V	VI	VII
A	Bm	C#m	D	E	F#m	G#dim

Bb	Cm	Dm	Eb	F	Gm	Adim	

B	C#m	D#m	E	F#	G#m	A#dim	

C	Dm	Em	F	G	Am	Bdim	

C#	D#m	Fm	F#	G#	A#m	Cdim

D	Em	F#m	G	A	Bm	C#dim

Eb	Fm	Gm	Ab	Bb	Cm	Ddim

E	F#m	G#m	A	B	C#m	D#dim

F	Gm	Am	Bb	C	Dm	Edim

F#	G#m	A#m	B	C#	D#	Fdim

G	Am	Bm	C	D	Em	F#dim

Ab	Bbm	Cm	Db	Eb	Fm	Gdim