#1
I just rented a book on music theory and Im confuses about what an interval is and what this augmented, diminished, and 7th stuff is. Can someone explain please?
#3
I have no idea... I just got to the part explaining intervals and I got lost. Im reading this book called "Practical Music Theory" by James Collier made in 1970 if anyone has it...
#5
An interval is a musical distance. We measure time in minutes and hours; distance in metres and kilometres, and music in intervals. The distance from C to D is a tone (or a major second). The distance from C to C# is a semitone (or a minor second). The distance from low "doh" to high "doh" is an octave. Those are intervals.

To augment something is to make it bigger. So the distance from C to G, say, is a perfect fifth. So, the distance from C to G# is a little bit bigger than that... or an augmented fifth.

Similarly, if something is diminished, it is made smaller. That same perfect fifth interval from C to G, if made one semitone smaller, would be C to Gb.... or a diminished fifth.

Now... say you're in C major.

C = 1
D = 2
E = 3
F = 4
G = 5
A = 6
B = 7

The distance from C to E is a third. The distance from C to A is a sixth. A seventh, then, is the distance from C to B. Now that is a *major* seventh. The distance between C to Bb is a minor seventh. (since it is flattened by one)

Generally, diminished and augmented intervals are used to describe fourths and fifths. A major interval is for the 2, 3, 6, and 7 scale degrees (see above) that remain unaltered in their major form. If they are lowered by a semitone, then they are considered to be not dimininished (as it would be for a fourth or a fifth), but minor.

ex. C - Ab = a minor sixth.

Hope that helps a little...

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
well, an interval is the distance between two notes in music.The intervals in music are:

Maj1/Min2/Maj2/Min3/Maj3/Perfect4/Perfect5/Min6/Maj6/Min7/Maj7/Perfect8 (octave)

So.. to clear this up by using the root note C, i will go through each interval with the respective note.

C to C: unison
C to C#/Db: minor second
C to D: major second
C to D#/Eb:minor third
C to E: major third
C to F: perfect forth
C to G: perfect fifth
C to Ab: minor sixth
C to A: major sixth
C to Bb: minor seventh
C to B: major seventh
C to C: perfect 8 or octave

i didn't add in the augmented and diminished intervals but they are, in a nutshell, a semi tone lower or higher then the interval. ex. C to a G# would be an augmented fifth. You can find out where these aug and dim intervals go later.

remember: and interval is the distance between two pitches!!
#7
Well wait a second, an interval is just the distance from one note to another right?
so Im trying to get a better understanding because this book is great but I just got lost in this one part and I want to continue it because its one of the only things that I can read and actually understand it so here is one question

F------------

D------------

B------------

G------------

E------------
  0# 
  -0-


so would this be an augmented 2nd?? and If that is correct, then what would be a minor 2nd?

Edit: also a semitone is the same as a half step?
Last edited by Martha Stewart at Aug 25, 2006,
#8
Semitone=half step

EDIT:

Yes that is an augmented second.

Minor second= one half step.

Minor second+half step=two half steps=major second.

Major second+half step=three half steps (but if it is still a second)=augmented second.

Three half steps can also be a minor third, but it depends on the context. If it was C to D#, it is an augmented second. If it is C to Eb, it is a minor third.
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Aug 25, 2006,
#9
That is awesome because I have been confused with that for a while when it comes to alternate tunings...

EDIT: thanks I think Im getting it now so how do you find out when a chord is augmented, or stuff like....or am I going too far?
Last edited by Martha Stewart at Aug 25, 2006,
#10
Augmented chords have an augmented fifth.

I don't know if you are going to far, since when I started learning theory, I was a mess. I learned everything out of order (imo).

So an augmented chord would be: 1-3-#5

So in C major: C E G#
#12
Quote by Martha Stewart
I just rented a book on music theory and Im confused about what an interval is and what this augmented, diminished, and 7th stuff is. Can someone explain please?
Introduction to Intervals

Group 1 Intervals

Group 2 Intervals
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#13
Quote by Don't Read This
they should sticky these interval answers



Good idea, but I think there already is a sticky somewhere.