#1
For learning what notes are in the major keys, would it be easier to just memorize them?

I think it would, because if you don't, you need to think back to the circle of fifths and do the math and ****. If you memorize it it can be like okay what D major? Oh thats just D E F# G A B C# D.

I dunno, give me your opinions.
#2
by major keys im assuming you mean ionian mode, not the "major modes" eg mixolydian, lydian.
personally i dont think about so much the name of the note im playing, i just think of it as the degree that it is (2nd, major/minor 3rd, 4th etc)
unless you need to know them for a guitar exam
which i know sometimes they do ask "what notes are in such and such"
but you just have to know your basic scale formula, its easier that way instead of learning all 12 keys IMO
#3
Yep that's what most people tend to do
Quote by yellowfrizbee
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#5
i have a method where each of the notes in the c major scale has a number
as follows
c-0
d-2
e-4
f- -1
g- 1
a- 3
b- 5

postitve numbers represent sharps negative represent flats so b which has 5 has 5 sharps

so those are the majors to make a minor subract three to make it a sharp add 7 to make flat subtract 7

example f# minor key sig -1 - 3 = -4 + 7 =3 so f# minor has 3 sharps

than one you know how many sharps or flats you have than you figure what they are

the order for sharps are

f c g d a e b

flats are backwards

a good acryonym to remember is (father charles goes down and ends battle) because it makes since backwards to

so you do have to do some math but its easier to memorize and for the numbers of the notes just think of it this way start at c and count back to c (c d e f g a b c)
then for numbers start at 0 and add 2 each time till you get to 4 then go to -1 and start again until you get to five its just a pattern 0,2,4,-1,1,3,5

i hope you understand and good luck just put another post if you have a question
#6
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
I just use them a lot lol. But sharps go in this order F C G D A E B.

Flats go in: B E A D G F C



Haha I know that, but I don't want to have to think about it. I just want to know it off the top of my head.

But hey what you guys are saying is I should learn the intervals?
#7
probably easier, if you're wanting to play faster stuff you're not going to want to know about the note names as such, just their intervals for example you're playing over a minor 9th chord you might want to play a minor 9th arpeggio or just hit the 9th note to emphasise or whatever ya know? then it doesnt really matter what note it is and you can apply it for every key without having to know each note name
#8
Haha that kind of makes sense. I have guitar lessons tommorow, so I'll bring this up and check out what you all are talking about.
#10
Grades.. I don't know what that means. I have been playing for a little under a year, but I just started theory about a month ago.
#11
ah that would explain it
okay forget about all the 9th stuff i said about its a little advanced at the moment, yeah grades you know like piano players and violin players can do grades, you can do them on guitar/bass/drums/whatever too, theres 8 grades in total i think.
think of it as with karate, you start on white belt and take an exam to become yellow belt, then keep going until you get to black belt (grade 8)
basically you know you can move your scale shapes into different keys yes?
but every major scale (also known as ionian mode, you'll learn about that later) has a formula of root, whole, whole, half, whole whole half, octave
the intervals are then named, the root note, 2nd, major 3rd, (perfect) 4th, (perfect) 5th, major 6th, major 7th and the octave, which is the same note as the root.
its probably quite a lot to get your head around at your stage though, i knew jack all about theory really when i had been playing for over a year so dont worry about it...
ive been playing just over 4 years now and im grade 6, but thats pretty fast progress, just depends how fast a learner you are, just keep up the practice *thumbs up*
phew... long post...
#12
I never actually consciously memorised them, except C Major - but that years ago. My teacher back then never actually specifically told me to memorise all the notes in every key - anyway, we moved onto chord construction, and after a few years I knew give or take one or two notes, every note in every major scale.

It just came naturally with doing lots of work with chords, never a conscious sit down and memorise thing.
#13
when you play a scale... say it out loud.

this way youll then pick up the sound of each note... and be really good at playing by ear.

..or reading music, i dunno. once you figure out where each note is on the staff, youd know where to be.
#14
Quote by hippie_cune
when you play a scale... say it out loud.

this way youll then pick up the sound of each note... and be really good at playing by ear.

..or reading music, i dunno. once you figure out where each note is on the staff, youd know where to be.



Yes! I say it out loud sometimes to know what the notes for the frets are as well.

However to Godderz...
I know those intervals.

root major 2nd minor 2nd major 3rd minmor 3rd perfect 4th augmented 4th diminished 5th perfect 5th augmented 5th major 6th minor 6th major 7th minor 7th octave.

I think. I memorized that a week ago.
#15
The more you use them, the more likely you are to memorize them.

Chris
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#16
Quote by Ascendancy5
Yes! I say it out loud sometimes to know what the notes for the frets are as well.

However to Godderz...
I know those intervals.

root major 2nd minor 2nd major 3rd minmor 3rd perfect 4th augmented 4th diminished 5th perfect 5th augmented 5th major 6th minor 6th major 7th minor 7th octave.

I think. I memorized that a week ago.


yep thats mostly correct i think... but i think a minor 6th is more commonly referred to as an augmented 5th?

edit: ooh and major2nd and minor 2nd is wrong i think, its just a second apart from the phrygian mode which would be a diminished 2nd