#1
well that's my question.
The way i do it is just find out the chord names of all the chords used and see which scale has those chords. Is that the right way?

2. What's the difference between the scale used in the song and the key of the song?

3. When I try to make riffs n all i use only 1 scale at a time. How do you use multiple keys in the same song?

4. And what the hell does "B phrygian mode over an Em7" mean ?
#2
4) B Phrygian over an Em7 chord means, for instance, if you are soloing, to play in B Phrygian while a Em7 chord is playing.
#3
oh. thanks.
And another question : like I made this little riff up with the foll chords: Am/F , Fadd9 , G, Dm, C Em and F#m
I checked and all the notes (A.D.G.C.F) ARE IN THE Am scale (except F#). Does this mean the key of the song is Am?

EDIT: the chords of my song are Am/F Fadd9 Am C G A Dm Em/A F#m

thanks jimbocook , got it!
Last edited by siddyjain at Aug 26, 2006,
#4
a simple way of finding out the key of the song is usually the first chord. quite often in simple rock songs the first chord is the key of which the song is in. but then it gets complicated when theres key changes and chords that arent in the key.
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#5
Find out what the chord/note the song resolves to. On most occasions this should give you the key.
#6
Quote by siddyjain
well that's my question.
The way i do it is just find out the chord names of all the chords used and see which scale has those chords. Is that the right way?


Pretty much. It won't be idiot proof, but it will get you there most of the time.

Quote by siddyjain
2. What's the difference between the scale used in the song and the key of the song?


Hopefully none. Hopefully the chords used in the song will be in the same key that the melody is in. There are some small variants, though. For instance, if you are playing a twelve-bar blues, you will be playing all major chords, say, A, D, and E, but the melody notes you will use will be basically in A minor. You will have a C instead of a C#, and a G instead of a G#, but it is those "altered" notes that give it the blues "flavour." This also applies, more or less, depending on how they are used, to the use of modes. However, in any case, if your chords are in the key of C and your melody is centered around a tonic of F and using a locrian scale.... well..... it will be really screwed up.

Quote by siddyjain
3. When I try to make riffs n all i use only 1 scale at a time. How do you use multiple keys in the same song?


Generally one scale, one key is sufficient. If the song itself changes keys (called a modulation), then the melody and the chords will both change key. How to know? You'll all of a sudden start hearing different chords. If you get into using modes, and this applies to the blues scale too, you will use different modes to achieve different flavours for your melody. It is those notes that would otherwise be considered "wrong" that will give your song a "blues" flavour (ie blues scale), or a "Spanish" flavour (ie phrygian mode), etc.

Quote by siddyjain
4. And what the hell does "B phrygian mode over an Em7" mean ?


already answered....

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#7
Quote by aaronni
Find out what the chord/note the song resolves to. On most occasions this should give you the key.


or a similar but not identical approach... what chord does the song end on? That would be the final resolution in the song... Does it sound "finished" on that chord? If it does, that may well be the key of the song too. If that is the same chord as the first chord of the song, odds are even better.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
no prob. glad it helped.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by axemanchris
or a similar but not identical approach... what chord does the song end on? That would be the final resolution in the song... Does it sound "finished" on that chord? If it does, that may well be the key of the song too. If that is the same chord as the first chord of the song, odds are even better.

Chris

Yea sorry didn't really go into much detail.
#11
If it's a simple song...it's probably in a fairly common key. I usually just play around with E, Em, A, Am, G, D, and C chords until I find the one that fits.

Or I'll play in those keys myself...whichever.
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