#1
Just accenting one note more so than the rest. Would that be right. Say you want to play in D Dorian would you just accent D more so than other notes?
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#2
Well sort of.

Let's use D Dorian for an example.

D E F G A B C D

The harmonic order of strengths is 1 3 5 7 9 11 13...

and in D Dorian, that would roughly be: D F A C E G B

Which means that it would be a stronger resolution, if you resolved to D than if you resolved to, say, G.

Also, a good way to use modes is to stress their unique intervals. Like, Aeolian has a b3.
#3
Harmonic Order of Strengths? Whats that?
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#4
Basically, in terms of scales, from left to right, it shows which degrees in the scale will have the strongest feeling of completion when you resolve to that note.

Here's a far better explanation. Thanks red

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ok so let me ramble for a minute or so.

The resolution IS the key. You're right. The notes are just the notes until you arrange them in a particular order.

The basis for this is the order of strengths... 1 3 5 7 9 11 13... 1 is the strongest note in the scale, the most defining... the third is next because it determines major/minor... so on and so forth. You may notice that this is the order in which chords are built up as well (chords = scales = modes = chords = scales = modes = ...)

For each new mode, the order or strengths changes... in G ionian, it's G B D F# A C E... now, take one of its modes, say D mixolydian... now the order is D F# A C E G B D... see where G went? Wayyyyyyyy to the back, so it plays a smaller role in giving D mixolydian its sound. Get it?

Now, we get into HOW you get this sound to come along. Well, of course, it's an art you pay thousands of dollars to learn. This is where the resolution part comes in. If you're playing mindless notes in the *position* that you learned for D mixolydian, there's no distinguishable resolution to the D note itself, so the ear just says, "oh, hey, G ionian." But if you work around the order of strengths for D mixolydian and play more notes from the left side (1 3...) than the right side (11 13...), you can feel the resolution, and THUS, you are playing in D mixolydian.

It's not easy to do... to play those target notes... my band has a song that is really based around A major, but in the main progression we throw a Gmaj chord in there (basically, A E G D are the chords). So, when I'm soloing, I watch out for the G# that is located within A ionian, which WOULD be the key until that Gmaj appears out of nowhere. So, the key then becomes A mixolydian... I focus on resolving to the A note but I also target the b7th (G) to let the listener know that this ain't A ionian.

Now, when you see the notes in sheet music, the key signature will only tell you the number of sharps/flats. Usually, though, the author will say (when you see, for example, 2 sharps) that the key is not necessarily the ionian mode. A good example I see that is real simple is "Misty Mountain Hop" by Led Zeppelin. My tab book shows 2 sharps, suggesting D major/ionian, but below the music, it says "Key signature reflects A mixolydian" (the main riff has a G note in it, remember).

So yeah. Throw more questions here.


red


EDIT:

v Yeah, tell me about it
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Aug 27, 2006,
#6
Very helpful, a lil confusing, but I got it for the most part...Thanks much I'll post here if I have any more questions.
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and here in musian talk forum section we encounter the noobus maximus