#1
Hey all;

One of the first things I learned about live sound was that very high gain, combined with lots of fx - especially reverbs, delays, etc. - was pretty much a guarantee that your guitar would get killed in any live mix.

I still use tons of gain (because I like to do kind of "shred" stuff), but make sure that my sound allows lots of the attack of the notes to punch through, helping to prevent that "too high gain w/ no attack = no guitar in the mix" conundrum.

As I browse through some of the shred videos, I'm noticing that they are using delays and reverbs on their sounds.... sometimes in surprising amounts. Granted, it helps to smooth things out and thicken them up and stuff, but this seems to be a recipe for disaster, as described above.

How do they avoid getting lost in the live mix? What are your experiences in this?

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#2
Alot of times they boost the volumes of their amps to stand out, also mess with the equalizer knobs to get the distortion to sound at its best.
#3
Turn up the mids a bit. Most guitarist set the treble and bass high and the mid very low but this make you very hard to hear when you are playing with a band (the highs get supressed by the hi-hats and cymbals of the drummer, and the bass gets supressed by the bassguitar). A bit more mid can make you stand out a lot more.
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#4
Plus the fact that guys that use heavy delay and reverb, like Vai and Satriani, are using the nicest gear alailable...which helps.
#5
Their amps also have effects loops so they don't have as much of a signal loss by having the signal going through a million pedals before even getting to the amp.
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#6
in addition to what everyone else says, consider the backing parts in the song. When the guitar does a solo the drums and bass are holding back a bit.

I'm not claiming to be a heavily experienced live musician but here is what i did live. I'd use a bit of a mid scoop for my rhythms to sounds heavy and meaty without being in your face. Then when it comes time for a lead, I give my tone a nice a big mid boost, a moderate volume boost and crank the fx. This dramatic change in volume and eq really stands out for anyone whos there headbanging with oversaturated ears.
#7
Cool. Thanks, guys. So...
+mids
+volume
fx in loop

... all easily addressed. Actually my setup already has #2,3 in place. Can monkey a bit w/ #1 if need be. I've shyed away from using hardly any delay and reverb for reasons I described above. I think I'll try re-adding them now that I have a nicer amp and a good clean boost pedal too.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
I use a Boss GE-7 EQ to take the soloing over the mix. Really works nice.