#1
Ok there are three things...that I think are often overlooked.

For guitar I want to learn:
1.) a good way to start reading music for guitar. I already can read sheet music, but it's not very efficient for me to play it on the guitar when I read it. So how could I go about learning to read music for guitar?

2.)how to get a stronger pinky finger. I rarely even use my pinky, unless I'm doing a nice open melodic song. But I would like to use my pinky in soloing.

and for music in general:
I want to learn to play better in 7/8 and other weird meters. Meaning without having to count out loud "1-2-3-4-5-6-7-1-2-..."
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#3
as for #1, guitar tab seems the most efficient way to read music, hence most of the content of this site... for #2, just work on scales and such using all your fingers, even doing 1, 2, 3, 4 on each string up and down, eventualy that'll strengthen your pinky

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#4
I know guitar tab is more efficient, but most people in the professional music world exchange music with sheet music...it's a more universal thing. And I think I'm going to do that with the scales...that's what I have been trying to do, but I usually get distracted.

alaub1491:I beg to differ.

Meter changes do amazing things to music...apparently you're not a prog fan.
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#5
For pinky strength, practice doing bends and vibrato using your ring finger and pinky, and then just your pinky. After a while of this, your pinky will be made of steel.
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#6
Play with guitarists better than you. I was put in my place recently by guitarists vastly more experienced than myself, and it was the single best thing to happen to me as a guitarist.
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#7
For the counting in weird meters, they are generally divided up into subdivisions of 2 and 3 beats with accents of the first beat. For example 7/8 could be looked at 1 231 21 2. I know that is still sort of counting but it breaks it up into more manageable chunks, and the key for me is just getting into the groove it.

Also for reading sheet music, you may or may not have already done this, but know the fretboard like the back of your hand.
#8
1. I don't understand. You want to learn guitar tab? Then go do it, it's easy as sin. Sheet music is way more effecient, in my opinion. You can share ideas with other musicians, you also have a vast pool of music to draw from.

2. Come up with a little study for yourself. It doesn't have to be musical, or it can be, no biggie either way. First, just go all over the fret board using fingers 1 and 4 (index/Pinky). So you will be jumping around doing minor thirds. Then do it with 3 and 4, doing seconds all over the place. Finally, semitone madness. Use fingers 3 and 4 and just go up and down, across, etc.

3. Find the accents. In 7/8 a pretty common one is

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ||

You will have to count in your time signature until you get used to it. Another good excersise is to come up with a riff in 7/8. Just make it quarter notes. Slow and steady. Then, add an 8th note in there. Keep changing the quarter notes into something that is of equal value (four 16ths, two 8th, etc). Then your riff won't sound mechanical. That will start to give you a feeling of possible rhythms, and will build your vocabulary.
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#9
I can do tab....I know how to read music...but when I read music, it's hard for me to play it on guitar. I can play sheet music on piano, but not on guitar.

I should probably just pick up a good guitar book (heh. almost an oxymoron) and practice sheet music that way. Sheet music is so obsolete, but it's a necessary evil.
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#10
Quote by bmw8719
For the counting in weird meters, they are generally divided up into subdivisions of 2 and 3 beats with accents of the first beat. For example 7/8 could be looked at 1 231 21 2. I know that is still sort of counting but it breaks it up into more manageable chunks, and the key for me is just getting into the groove it.

Also for reading sheet music, you may or may not have already done this, but know the fretboard like the back of your hand.

Yeah, 1-2 1-2 1-2-3 works best for me. Maybe I should just listen to lots and lots of rush and eventually I'll get 7/8 down.
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Ghey.
#11
^ well you cant just say 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 is best for you because some songs in 7/8 wont have that feel. you have to listen to it and get the feel for how it sounds to be comfortable with it. if you have a program where you can make drum beats set up a few examples for yourself to listen to. try something like these three things to get the idea:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k   k   k
s   s   s
h h h h h h h

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k     k   k
s     s   s
h h h h h h h

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k   k     k
s   s     s
h h h h h h h

k = kick
s = snare
h = hi-hat

set one of those up on repeat at a time. when listening you will hear they are each in 7/8 and each have different accents. its something you can do with other time signatures to get a hang of those as well. i just started a class with a teacher who says you just have to feel it and dont count at all. for an hour we basicly just tapped along to the beat of different songs. you really start to get a feel for the beat doing this, but i dont think ill ever really stop counting completly. it is necessary in some places, but once you get a feel for things you rely more on that instinct than that count. or at least thats how she explained it.
#12
a good way to help translate sheet music to the guitar (it worked for me) is to know the notes on the neck...knowing which pitches yield certain notes on the staff will help you tremendously, and it would be pretty difficult to do without having a decent amount of fretboard knowledge...also, don't obsess with knowing every note, it's very helpful to become familiar with intervals and where different scale degrees would be located in relation to a certain note - there is a different version of fretboard warrior that acts as a trainer to help you locate pitches and transfer them to sheet music and vice versa (but you have to pay for it); needless to say, this will probably help your sight-reading ability, which is essential for studio and orchestral musicians

the best way to strengthen your pinky is to use your pinky...not much more to say; check out Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar by Troy Stetina, it has an abundance of left hand exercises which will force you to use your pinky
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