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#1
In an effort to offset all the SRV (he's great, just really over-discussed) and John Mayer (He's an empty husk of a human being that just plain sucks and probably doesn't have a soul) threads, I decided we need a thread for all the artist who arn't mentioned twenty times a day. They don't even have to be obscure, just never discussed.

For starters... Hubert Sumlin. An incredibly under appreciated guitarist. I've brought him up before and people seem to like him, so why need Hubert talk?

Not many non-guitarists get talked about either. No one like Paul Butterfield, Charlie Musselwhite, Sonny Boy Williamson, "Rice" Miller or Otis Spann?

And to get the ball rolling, what post Wolf stuff, by Hubert Sumlin would you recommend?
"There's Jimmy Page, one of the biggest thieves of American black music to ever walk the Earth."
#2
Yay! It's about damn time we had a thread like this.

I have About Them Shoes by Hubert Sumlin. It's very good. He's one of my biggest influences. I admittedly don't know much about his solo material, though.

As for non-guitarists, who else loves Professor Longhair? Possibly the greatest blues pianist of all time. He is to me, anyway.
#3
as for non guitarists i love sonny boy williamson II, hes an absolutely wonderful harmonica player, has anyone heard of him balcancing his harp on his lips and playing with his nose?
#4
^ I've never heard of him doing that, but that's some straight up talent right there. I've been meaning to get into him more. Where's a good place to start off?
#6
Johnny "Guitar" Watson. He was one of Jimmie and Stevie Ray Vaughan's biggest influeneces and was one of if not the first guitarist to play with his teeth. He mixed Blues with Funk.

Melvin Taylor. A very cool blues sound with some mean licks. Kind of an electric blues mixed with jazz and some Santana.

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#7
^ Johnny "Guitar" Watson is awesome. Just picked up an anthology of his not too long ago.

Junior Kimbrough is great as well, I urge anyone who hasn't heard him to find some of his stuff.
Last edited by slinks at Aug 27, 2006,
#8
Robert Pete Williamson: One of the most creative Bluesmen within the Delta mold. He's been coverd by Captian Beefheat and the Black Keys, but is still far to underappreciated.

I LOVE professor Longhair, kinda like a Cooler Dr.John.
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#9
Kerry Kearney
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#11
Snowy White, Albert Collins, R.L. Burnside and Robben Ford.

Those four are absolutely brilliant blues musicians, and yet nobody seems to bat an eyelid about them, which I think is a great shame.

But for most people who don't listen to blues music, pretty much anyone apart from BB King and SRV are obsucre blues musicians.
#12
How about some Keb' Mo'. He brings the classic Delta blues with more of a modern style and it sounds oh so sweet.

Taj Mahal. He's an incredible slide guitarist and blends Jamaicain sounds into his playing. His version of Statesboro Blues is phenomonal.

Don't want to be an actor pretending on the stage
Don't want to be a writer with my thoughts out on the page
Don't want to be a painter 'cause everyone comes to look
Don't want to be anything where my life's an open book

Phish - Waste
#13
Quote by slinks
Yay! It's about damn time we had a thread like this.

I have About Them Shoes by Hubert Sumlin. It's very good. He's one of my biggest influences. I admittedly don't know much about his solo material, though.

As for non-guitarists, who else loves Professor Longhair? Possibly the greatest blues pianist of all time. He is to me, anyway.
I have never actually heard him, but my dad saw him live and said he was freaking good.
#14
Mississippi John Hurt. The gentle songster bluesman.
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#15
Can anyone recomend me some RL Burnside, I'm not sure where to start?
EDIT: Oh and what about Blind Willie McTell, how would you describe his style? I've heard a bit about him.
Last edited by CheckOutSerafin at Aug 28, 2006,
#16
Quote by CheckOutSerafin
Can anyone recomend me some RL Burnside, I'm not sure where to start?
EDIT: Oh and what about Blind Willie McTell, how would you describe his style? I've heard a bit about him.

"Rollin' an Tumblin'" is a good place to star for R.L. Burnside.
"There's Jimmy Page, one of the biggest thieves of American black music to ever walk the Earth."
#17
Quote by CheckOutSerafin
Oh and what about Blind Willie McTell, how would you describe his style? I've heard a bit about him.

Old blues, real blues, from around Robert J's time. Incredible stuff.
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#18
Mississippi Fred McDowell. Really quite brilliant. Delta blues on an electric guitar, like early John Lee Hooker.
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#19
No one mentioned Robert Johnson? Son House? Skip James?

I love the old blues
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#20
Quote by Encore_God
Mississippi Fred McDowell. Really quite brilliant. Delta blues on an electric guitar, like early John Lee Hooker.


Hell of an abrasive and rigid player. There is power in those fingers!
Don't be derivative. Explore...
#21
Quote by CloudOne
No one mentioned Robert Johnson? Son House? Skip James?

I love the old blues

Robert Johnson and Son House are anything but under-appreciated.
"There's Jimmy Page, one of the biggest thieves of American black music to ever walk the Earth."
#22
Luther Jonhson and Champion Jack Dupree are two of my favorites.
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#24
not nice calling mayer worthless
"the electric church"

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#25
and robert johnson is the man by the way
"the electric church"

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Fender Highway one Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
...soon to be more added
#26
I like Charley Patton just because he always sounds completely drunk off his ass and slightly belligerent.
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#27
Somebody already mentioned Mississippi John Hurt so I'll throw in Reverend Gary Davis. I could have the tab to "Twelve Sticks" right in front of me and I'll probably never be able to play it.
#28
ok, i havent read all of the posts, so forgive me if im just repeating what people have said.

first off, hubert sumlin was mentioned, finally he gets a little respect, he is the only guitarist i have ever heard with a tone that is simultaniously beautiful and vile. i love this man. i havent heard any of his post wolf stuff, but he did an album with levon helm on drums, so buy that, cause levon helm is god.

ok, next, james cotton, he may not be that underrated, but have you heard his harp playing on muddy waters 'hard again' LP?, its phenominal.

anyone mentioned 'steady rollin' bob margolin?, he was muddy waters guitarist from 1973 to 1980, good guitarist, and he had a cool white man afro.

robert nighthawk and earle hooker are(apart from elmore james) 2 of the most important guitarists in the progression of electric slide guitar, check them out.

lousiana red doesnt get as much respect as i think he should, top guitarist, singer and writer.

last but not least, carey bell, top harmonica player, he played bass for robert nighthawk, then in the 70's returned to harmonica to play with muddy waters and willie dixon, then he went solo, good stuff, top player. His son, lurrie bell is a top guitar player too.
#29
the first person i thought of when i heard the word 'obscure' was johnny winter. some of his blues sliding is out of this world.
#30
Most of my favourite blues guitar players were sidemen to better known singers or piano players. Like Wayne Bennett, who I first heard on one track ("Cry Before I Go") of a John Lee Hooker LP "Tantalizing With The Blues". It turns out he was Bobby Bland's guitar player for years, and also worked with Elmore James. He died in relative obscurity in 1992. See http://www.deltablues.net/tullos.html for an interesting account of someone's chance encounter with him in hospital.

The Mississippi piano player Eddie Boyd had great taste in guitar players. Lee Cooper can be heard on Boyd's Album "Five Long Year - The Complete Recordings Vol. 2 1951-53". As far as I know he was well regarded at the time, but he was a heavy drinker, and I think it messed up his career. His playing on "Third Degree" is to me, a masterclass in the art of blues guitar accompaniment.

As far as I can make out, Buddy Guy played a couple of different styles in the early days, maybe depending on how he felt at the time, or maybe depending on whether he was recording his own material, or backing up somebody else. Listen to him on Big Mama Thornton's album "In Europe". The guitar work on this album to me is the some of the greatest electric blues guitar I've heard. If I was to pick one track it would be "Sweet Little Angel". And it's all about melody, tone and phrasing, not speed or tricks. He sounds completely different to the usual Buddy Guy, which is great too, but for different reasons...

And then there's Peter Green. I'm not a fan of some of the better known British revival guitar players, but Green's blues work in the late 1960s, especially with the above mentioned Eddie Boyd leaves me at a loss for words. Try the "Complete Blue Horizon Sessions" (formerly known as "7936 South Rhodes" plus an extra couple of tracks ).
#31
Any fans of Ali Farka Toure? I've just picked up Savane and I have had Talking Timbuktu (an album he did with Ry Cooder) for a while. He's legendary and yet still somehow so underrated by many people. For those who haven't heard him, think of a more modernized form of delta blues with an African flair and you've got the general idea.
#32
Son House & Elmore James. 'nuff said.
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#33
I'm not sure how well these are known:
Ma Rainey
Leadbelly (he's kind of blues)
Lightning Hopkins
Memphis Minnie
Sister Rosetta Tharpe
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#34
Oh so many. How bout:

Sleepy John Estes
Furry Lewis
BBQ Bob
Tampa Red
Blind Boy Fuller

or more recent:

Son Seals
Kid Ramos
Hollywood Fats
Mark Dufresne

oh so many so little time.
#35
i wouldnt call hubert sumlin obscure. he DID play guitar with the great Howlin Wolf...

alright i think he deserves my mentioning of him in this thread. im talkin about mr. John Hammond Jr. son of the famous producer john Sr, Jr is one of the best delta-style white blues guitarists around. i saw him a few months ago at a little club around here (hes not THAT obscure though, hes known around te world. he played with Howlin Wold, the allman brothers and a bunch of other legends), and hes was just incredible.
#36
Surprised no one mentioned Kenny Wayne Shepherd or Doyle Bramhall II. And if I see someone call Kenny Wayne Shepherd a SRV copy, I will shove my guitar up their ass.
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#37
(To SGstriker)I don't know why those two get **** thrown at them all the ****ing time. I really enjoy their music. It has a great feel to it.
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#38
(To SGstriker)I don't know why those two get **** thrown at them all the ****ing time. I really enjoy their music. It has a great feel to it.


Yes I know, I went to a KWS concert a week ago. It RULED.
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i feel like you have an obsession with aubrey plaza.


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at least we can all agree SGstriker is the woooooooooooooooooooooorst
#39
LUCKY!

What were the highlights?
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Quote by JD2k9
Well, life is like a penis.
Women make it hard.
Also, it's short but seems long when it gets hard.
#40
LUCKY!

What were the highlights?


Well, they opened up with "Born With a Broken Heart". Then they played a couple more songs off of the first album. Then they played some stuff off of the "Trouble Is." album. Then, they played some stuff off of the new album. Then, they played one song(Shotgun Blues) off of the "Live On" album. Then, they went off of the stage for a few minutes, then, came back on and played an SRV song called "Honey Bee" then played "Voodoo Child".

The two biggest highlights for me were Voodoo Child, because I think that he played it better than SRV. The other highlight was when they played Born With a Broken Heart. We also got to sing along to Blue On Black. IT was awesome
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Quote by chookiecookie
i feel like you have an obsession with aubrey plaza.


Quote by WCPhils
at least we can all agree SGstriker is the woooooooooooooooooooooorst
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