#1
Alright, so over the years I've changed many a string on my guitar. I've messed around and changed gauges, even mixed up sets and stuff. So I take my guitar in to be resurfaced or whatever (is that itself bull****? sounded kinda like it to me) and hey I get a free restringing with that, great. So then the repair guy tells me (I think he thought I was a beginner cause I have a lower-end guitar, but I've been playing for 4 years or so) that if I want to change the gauge of the strings, he needs to calibrate the bridge for it, because if it's calibrated wrong it could bend the neck...

Is he just trying to get money or is that real? I've never heard of anybody calibrating their bridge....
#2
Is it a trem bridge?
If you change guages dynamically, say, 9s to 13s straight, then you have to tighten your truss rod a smidgen, but... In terms of fixed bridges, aside from intonation, there's not really anything to calibrate.

In terms of a trem... It depends on how much pressure you put on the bridge to keep it flat.
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#4
yes~ changin the gauges does require adjustment on ur intonation... the pitch of the harmonic and the pitch the string would not be equal...
#6
Yep, playing higher up you will be out of tune if your intonation is screwed up. Plus thicker strings will hurt your neck if you go too thick without adjusting the truss rod, I am sure someone has said this though...
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#7
Unless it is a huge adjustment in the guage of strings, i don't see why he would need to.
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