#1
What re the pros and cons of using the different jacks.
Gear:
Mesa Boogie Tremoverb And Recto cab
Peavey 5150 and cab
Peavey classic 2 12
Agile Intercepor pro 7
Jackson soloist sls
Jackson RR3
Ibanez 7321
Washburn Dimebolt 333
#2
1/4" jacks are found on almost every piece of equipment. XLRs are usually found on power amps and PA speakers (powered), mixers, mics...etc.
#3
This I know but does not answer my question.
Gear:
Mesa Boogie Tremoverb And Recto cab
Peavey 5150 and cab
Peavey classic 2 12
Agile Intercepor pro 7
Jackson soloist sls
Jackson RR3
Ibanez 7321
Washburn Dimebolt 333
#4
different types of shielding in the cables i'm guessing?
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#5
XLR are for balanced cables. They are noise canceling, so you can use long cable lengths without adding noise from interference. Balanced audio works on the principle that two identical signals which are inverted 180° out of phase will cancel each other out. The cables used are designed to carry two versions of the signal and manipulate the relative phases of these signals to eliminate noise. The inverted audio signal is re-inverted at the input stage of whatever device recieves the signal to make both signals the same. Any noise is then inverted, and out of phase, so it's cancelled out leaving only the combined original signal.

1/4" jacks can be unbalanced Tip Sleeve(TS) cable, such as regular instrument cable, or balanced (TRS -Tip ring sleeve, for the 2 signals and ground). This depends on whether the device has balanced inputs/outputs however.
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Last edited by Erock503 at Aug 28, 2006,
#7
Most 1/4" cables you'll buy will be TS, TRS cables are not exactly cheap. You can always use a simple adapter to convert: from TRS to XLR doesn't need a transformer or anything, as long as it was a balanced signal coming out of the guitar. Your guitar hopefully has a 1/4" TS jack in itself, use that. To make the signal in your guitar balanced so you could put an XLR jack in there wouldn't be hard actually, mainly pointless. Sure, you'd technically remove some interference. Has anyone ever had that big of a problem? If you were doing a long cable run at low power levels (ie: not speaker levels, we are tallking line level, -10 or +4db) then you'd want it to be balanced, but for your normal 20' cable? no need in most places.

XLR jacks ARE locking though. If you really needed that though, the better option would be a locking jack for 1/4" plugs, I think Neutrik makes one. Don't put an XLR jack on there if you aren't sending a balanced signal through it, it will only confuse stage hands!
#8
the cable alone won't make it balanced, it has to be a balanced sending output and a balanced receiving input to use the 2 out of phase signals. You can't just make a balanced signal by using an XLR jack. You can make adapters to use it, but the signal won't be balanced. A guitar does not have a balanced signal, and you can't just convert it with cable, you would need some kind of preamp in the guitar to do that.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
amp clips
amp vids