#1
i want to be able to understand chords. so i have a couple of questions.

1. will someone tell me what chords are moveable?

2. will someone tell me what i would need to learn (i know almost no theory) to be able to make my own chords, know how they fit together, know if they are moveable or not, etc. etc.?

thanks, please be polite, and please help. also, the more responses, the better, that way i can see a few different ways of explaining what needs to be said. i hope that made sense. good night, i hope to have some responses by morning.
If you want to jam in/around Mooresville NC message me.
#3
1. Bar Chords are movable

2. Take a look at the "Steal This Video" series, Pick is a great teacher imo. Download the videos and watch them a few times.. (tip: pause the video when you become confused and rewind a few minutes back..)
Love, Peace 'N Rock to you all!
Sorry for my bad english, I'm danish
#4
thanks for the replies, does anybody know where i should start with learning this kind of theory? will someone give me some more links please? or more specifics of what i should be learning?
If you want to jam in/around Mooresville NC message me.
#5
Quote by 812many
thanks for the replies, does anybody know where i should start with learning this kind of theory? will someone give me some more links please? or more specifics of what i should be learning?


Go to the link I gave you and start with learning how construct basic major/minor/augmented/diminished triads. That lesson covers it pretty well.

Once you've learnt and understood that, the rest is a doddle.
#6
Hey I have a question about chords, but why start a new thread.

Uhm, I was wondering liek if you are doing chord progressions in the key of C, you can do like C D F or something, then do like an Am chord right? And switch into a minor key?
#7
Quote by empty
1. Bar Chords are movable


BARRE!!!!!! for christs sake.

ok.. technically ALLchords can be moved.. you just have to create the barre that moves the 'open position" down. but the main ones are E, Em, E7, A, Am, A7, D, Dm, D7, and the C shape.

these positions may be a bit challenging at first, but hell.. thats how most things are. practice practice practice.

also, remember that when you move a chord down a fret youre sharpening it by one step.
#8
Quote by 812many
thanks for the replies, does anybody know where i should start with learning this kind of theory? will someone give me some more links please? or more specifics of what i should be learning?
In my opinion the best resource out there for learning guitar chord theory is Michael Policastro's Understanding How to Build Guitar Chords and Arpeggios.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#9
Quote by hippie_cune
also, remember that when you move a chord down a fret youre sharpening it by one step.


No, when you move it up a fret you're sharpening it by one half step. So, moving, an A chord up a fret would give you A#, etc.

Hey man, follow the link that JohnlJones gave you, he's a smart guy. He knows his stuff and if he says something will help you, do it if you want to learn.

I will, however, give you a couple of barre chords for you to learn, and will tell you how they are related to open position chords.

For example, we have the E Major open chord:


e---0------
B---0------
G---1------
D---2------
A---2------
E---0------


Now, the E Major form barre chord is one of the most commonly used forms in rock. If you want a movable barre chord with the root on the 6th string, this is the barre chord to use! In the open position, the root is the 6th string open, right? That's the note, E. Thus, this chord is an E Major. What will we do if we want to move it up the neck? The first step is to create a new root. What should our new chord be? G? Okay. Let's move this to make it a G.

Now, as (I hope) you know, G is on the 3rd fret, 6th string. That's going to be our new root. We can't just put our finger there, and strum the strings though, can we? We have the move the entire chord. This also invoves creating an "artificial nut," which will involve barring some strings (thus the name, "barre" chords). How do we know which fret to bar? We need to place our bar the same number of frets away from the chord shape as the real nut was from the chord shape, back before we moved it. Don't understand? I'll explain.

Here's our new chord shape:


e---3------
B---3------
G---4------
D---5------
A---5------
E---3------


You place your index finger across all the strings, on the 3rd fret, and bar. Now, place your middle finger on the 4th fret, G string, your ring finger on the 5th fret, A string, and your pinky finger on the 5th fret, D string.

It will probably be very hard to play at first, but with practice, your fingers will gain strength. This shape is a G Major.

Now, look at your fingers. Do you see a similarity with the E open position chord you were playing earlier?


e---3------
B---3------
G---[color="Red"]4[/COLOR]------
D---[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]------
A---[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]------
E---3------


Do you see it now? Look at the fingers marked in red. See, when you move the root up by 3 frets, from the open E string to the 3rd fret on the E string, you move all the other frets in the chord up the same number of frets. That's where our artificial nut comes in. If you just moved the E open position chord up the neck without barring, you could make some really bad sounding chords. You also have to move the nut up the neck with the rest of the chord.

Let's make this an A chord, with the root on the E string, shall we? What is it going to look like now?


Did you say:


e---5------
B---5------
G---6------
D---7------
A---7------
E---5------


See, you're going to bring that bar up with your chord. You're going to play it the exact same way, with the same fingering patterns, but instead of having the root on the E string, 3rd fret, you're going to move it up the neck to the 5th fret. It's now an A barre chord.

So, that's a small overview of how to move the E chord. I'm going to leave you to figure out how to move the other common, open position chords, such as Em, A, and Am.

Don't forget to read the link that JohnlJones gave you! If you want to learn how to make your own chords, that is a great resource there!

I hope this helped.
#10
sorry, i have another question. i was looking into the article about theory for beginners, and i dont understand what it means part of the time. i only read the first part of it so far. how can i tell what the root note is? and how do i understand what the numbers are telling me here?:

Major- 1 3 5

Minor- 1 b3 5

Augmented- 1 3 #5

Diminished- 1 b3 b5

if you have the time, please explain what i dont understand, and if you are really patient, you can tell me the very basics.

and just for the record, i can play the guitar decently, and i can imrpov and such, i even play in a band at write some songs, but the reason i am looking into all this is because i want to understand more about what im doing instead of just what i like to hear. i am also trying to play more "real" chords, make more "challenging and better music." so thanks to everyone who helps me.
If you want to jam in/around Mooresville NC message me.
#11
^Those numbers are the scale degrees you take to build the specific chord.. all of them in reference to the major scale.

Do it in C...

So, take your C Major scale...


[B]C[/B] - D - [B]E[/B] - F - [B]G[/B] - A - B
[B]1[/B] - 2 - [B]3[/B] - 4 - [B]5[/B] - 6 - 7


Then, take the 1st, 3rd and 5th tone (C - E - G) and you have a C Major triad.

The same works for a minor triad (1 - b3 - 5) only this time, you flat (b) the third note. You end up with C - Eb - G - your Cminor triad.

Do you get that?
#12
right, but how do i play that? i must not understand it fully, because it seems to me like that is all on one string...
If you want to jam in/around Mooresville NC message me.
#13
^You can take those notes and play them anywhere you want. Aslong as you're playing the notes C - E - G you'll be playing a C major chord. It doesn't matter where on the fretboard they are.