#1
Do you think it's a necessary component to playing music? If someone is playing creatively and is able to make a melody to match a chord progression, or is able to make a solo that sounds good, but knows little to no theory, should they learn it anyway?

Couldn't learning to understand music through theory possibly take away the person's creativity by making them think differently?

What do you guys think?
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#2
id say learn the basics, dimebag has said countless times (for example) that he learned the basic stuff like major and minor scales but was never someone to stare at books all day...and look how he turned out, but he obv practiced and practiced, just learn a good amount to get goin and then once u can apply it and improvise, youll be good..thats my opinion
#3
If you want to get to the top, like Satch or Petrucci level (especially Yngwie) you're going to want to know theory.
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#4
Quote by d_byrne23
id say learn the basics, dimebag has said countless times (for example) that he learned the basic stuff like major and minor scales but was never someone to stare at books all day...and look how he turned out, but he obv practiced and practiced, just learn a good amount to get goin and then once u can apply it and improvise, youll be good..thats my opinion


Dime was hot too i love his beard

You don't HAVE to learn it, but the basics is good to learn. I could never get it to sink in so i didn't bother past the basics.
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#5
It's not absolutely, 100%, life or death necessary, but it'll help a whole hell of a lot.
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#6
I don't know if you call it "theory" or "relative pitch" but the more you practice, the better you get. No Lie.
#7
Your average guitar playing idiot only knows the bare minimum of theory. If you want to make some money out of your music, you don't need a great deal of theory. The most famous songs are often the simplest because they are catchy and easily marketable.

Real talent doesn't mean **** anymore, but I say that hard work and actual knowledge of what you are doing will always reap a bigger profit than taking the easy road.
#8
Quote by GuitarGod610
Your average guitar playing idiot only knows the bare minimum of theory. If you want to make some money out of your music, you don't need a great deal of theory. The most famous songs are often the simplest because they are catchy and easily marketable.

Real talent doesn't mean **** anymore, but I say that hard work and actual knowledge of what you are doing will always reap a bigger profit than taking the easy road.



i agree, it doesn't take much knowledge of the instrumement, just musical knowledge, what sounds right. I see it all the time, talentless people making good music. hang in there, and write what YOU are doing. It'll pay off (one way or the other) in the end.
#9
More knowledge is never a bad thing. I always wonder about questions like
this. It kind of boils down to "Is it OK if I remain ignorant?" Ignorance just means
you lack knowledge of something. Everybody falls into the category in any number
of ways. No shame in that. But wanting to be ignorant ... THAT is stupidity!

For Rock, you really only need a surprisingly small amount of theory. Just some
basic understanding of a number of concepts and you're good to go for most rock.
For Jazz and more demanding music, you'll need more.
#10
Quote by edg


For Rock, you really only need a surprisingly small amount of theory. Just some
basic understanding of a number of concepts and you're good to go for most rock.
For Jazz and more demanding music, you'll need more.


That is true, but not completly right. I mean they are guidelines. I know a lot of heavy metal muscicians who know a ton of theory, and I know some blues musicians who don't know that much. I mean it would be better basically to just follow the old saying "the more, the merrier".
#11
I don't think it's important tho I would like to learn it. but at the same time I don't think music should have rules
#12
It doesn't, but it does. It doesn't when it comes to writing stuff, but if you want it to sound good (especially solos), then you should follow the guidlines of music theory.
#13
Quote by kurosawa
I don't think it's important tho I would like to learn it. but at the same time I don't think music should have rules


Music theory isn't a set of rules: it explains why things sound the way they do.

If you learn your major scale, you have learned what a certain set of intervals sound like in relation to each other. Learn some more theory, and you can find out how that scale is applied in a lot of music, and what it sounds like when it is used.

So when you are looking for a sound over a chord progression, you can remember: ok, this is what the major scale sounds like.... I think it would sound good here!

If you use it in this sense, it does not inhibit creativity at all: in fact, it can help you be more creative, if your knowledge of theory helps you play the ideas that come into your head.
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#14
I would go along with the people who are saying that it's helpful to at least know the basics, for example, when you're trying to work out which chord to play next in a sequence, a bit of theory can help you narrow it down, though I would also agree that too much theory may not be a good thing (depending on what type of music you're playing) sometimes the 'wrong' chord or note is more interesting.
#15
Theory isnt a neseccary thing, but I would know my scales pretty well.
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#16
Quote by psychodelia
Music theory isn't a set of rules: it explains why things sound the way they do.

If you learn your major scale, you have learned what a certain set of intervals sound like in relation to each other. Learn some more theory, and you can find out how that scale is applied in a lot of music, and what it sounds like when it is used.

So when you are looking for a sound over a chord progression, you can remember: ok, this is what the major scale sounds like.... I think it would sound good here!

If you use it in this sense, it does not inhibit creativity at all: in fact, it can help you be more creative, if your knowledge of theory helps you play the ideas that come into your head.

Amen.
#17
I would thoroughly advise it, because it allows you to interpret what you see on the page or what you hear into more recognisable material, and when you come to composing (a thing that relies on music theory) you can create a very elborate and clever piece with a better understanding of musical knowledge.

It has helped me a lot and I shall continue to study it.
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