#1
since i'm still pretty new to guitars (my acoustic is almost a year old and my electric 4 months) i have no experience with worn frets, and i was wondering...
how long does it take for frets to wear out so they would cause bad tone and buzzing? for an average player...
#2
I'm actually not a 100% sure,

But honestly, your guitars at that age would have probabaly none to minimal signs of fret wear. They sell guitars on ebay from the 80's, 70's and the 60's and their frets are usually pretty much ok. I have a classical maton guitar thats at least 30 years old and the frets on it are in good condition. Unless its a hunk of crap guitar with frets made of really thin wire.

Dan
Gear List;

Laney VH100R with Matching Cab
Ibanez RGT42FM
Schecter C-1+
BC Rich Neck Thru Warlock
ISP Noise Decimator
Ibanez TS9
#3
Quote by 666_Belial
since i'm still pretty new to guitars (my acoustic is almost a year old and my electric 4 months) i have no experience with worn frets, and i was wondering...
how long does it take for frets to wear out so they would cause bad tone and buzzing? for an average player...


Many years and a lot of playing. If you see flat spots on the frets, that's totally
normal and you can play on them for quite some time. Until you really notice
it. I've had my 74 Gibson L5S for 25 years and I've had 1 fret job on it.
#4
It really depents on a lot of things. First, frets are made of a rather soft brass/nickle alloy that easily wears out. Using a capo or roaming only on the lowest five frets makes matters worse (This means that expert players are a lot easyer on the frets than primitive insults to culture like me). Old guitars that show no fretwear are either refretted or have not been played extensively.
On the other hand; a little bit of wear should have no big consequences. If the frets lost their rounded shape and are flattened a bit, but you notice no problems when playing, just go on wearing the buggers out.
Problems arise when grooves right underneath a string make it hard to bend up the string. A worn fret while the next higher one is as new can cause fretbuzz, but most of the time wear becomes gradually less higher on the fretboard. Such problems can probably be solved by a little dressing up with key file and sanding paper (and not forgetting to mention maskin tape)
The main reason to decide to do a refret is a messed up intonation on open chords, when the fretted notes have to be pressed down too much and don't match the open strings any more. When attempts to solve this by lowering the top nut only causes fretbuzz higher up the neck, you know the Time Between Overhauls has passed.