#2
Picking as fast as you possibly can, at a steady constant speed. A good tip would be anchoring your pinky to do it, but lots of people have different techniques. There are lessons in the lessons section.
#3
Quote by codybcool
Picking as fast as you possibly can, at a steady constant speed. A good tip would be anchoring your pinky to do it, but lots of people have different techniques. There are lessons in the lessons section.


You're going to get massacred for saying that.

I believe 'proper' trem picking is picking the same note extremely fast.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#4
Psh, i don't care, technique is individual to all people and is based on preference.
#5
ya, i was always taught not to anchor... but i play jsut as fast either way... maybe im jsut weird
#6
No offense, but you should really do a quick search before you ask this stuff. Someone asked this exact same thing barely a week ago. I'm not bashing you, but other people will if you make a habbit of asking questions that were just answered.

Edit: maybe it was a little longer than a week ago... but I do remember this same question recently
Last edited by GreatHolyMonkey at Aug 31, 2006,
#7
Quote by codybcool
Picking as fast as you possibly can, at a steady constant speed.


^ thats pretty much it, though it doesn't hav 2 b as fast as you can, but just fast. Also use up and down strokes to increase the spead, you'll also find this helps to keep the rythm and speed.

You can change notes, slide, do everything you normally would, even though it takes more practise to slide, etc.

Good Luck
#8
Before the days of electric guitars when a note was called to be held longer than the natural sustain of the fretted instrument the note was played by classical and flamenco guitarists in 16th, 32nd, and 64th notes for the length of the note. This sustaining technique was called Tremelo. The technique for this effect was done by the i, m, and a fingers and was different between classical and flamenco guitarists and still is today. When flatpicking gained in popularity, guitarists achieved the Tremelo effect by rapidly picking the length of the note with a pick.
#9
whoa hold on there, NO do not anchor you pinky, it's proven to slow you down, plus, it creates unecessary tension in you hand, causing pain, and/or permanent damage

now complete floating is dificult so if you must rest your hand, for a righty, hold your palm up in your face, the lower left corner can rest against the bridge, other then that, you skin should not make contact with any part of the guitar, if your using a pick

this is, imo the way that is the most relaxed, and easiest to manipulate, also, try to keep your wrist straight, or at least as straight as possible

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#10
Quote by codybcool
Psh, i don't care, technique is individual to all people and is based on preference.


Not entirely true. Some things are just wrong.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by codybcool
Psh, i don't care, technique is individual to all people and is based on preference.


Lets not go through that whole "anchor or no anchor?" thread again
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