#1
ok, i figured it was time to seriously start learning some theory because playing for the past 4 years on just reading tabs is getting boring. i know all about scales and how to use them in key and such, but i was wondering if you could change scales? let's say i'm soloing in E in a pentatonic scale. could i then switch to a harmonic minor scale in E? i know the switch probably won't sound too good but i'm just using those 2 scales as an example. thanks
#2
Of course you can buddy, that is how solos are made!

See what goes well together and make sure it is tasteful and doesn't sound like chalk and cheese. If it is in a minor key, stick with a minor scale or mode, that is what I think anyways.
#4
Think of it like this :

"The only scale, is the chromatic scale."

-Someone else


I am a huge fan of people learning their scales, and learning what is what. But when it comes to passing tones and stuff, the world is your oyster. No note is a wrong note. Some may be better than others though. Scales exist as a shortcut to help you, and they help a lot. Never become a slave to them though. Diminished the fifth once in a while in your solo to keep things interesting. Flat the second for some scaaaaary stuff, or maybe just to get a great tension and release.

Speaking of tension and release, for some real fun, play in the scale that fits the key of your song, but play it a half step up near the end of your solo, then bring it back to the original key. If done properly you will have some awesome tension/release going on. I'd be careful though, hah.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#5
My impression is that alot of it is just style and how you want play. Something I saw mentioned here that I have been working on is changing the scale to go along with chord changes. For example, if the song is in A major, I will use notes from the A major scale, but once the underlying chord switches to something like Bm, I will start using notes from the Bm scale.

Most of it is just style anyway, so go with what sounds best to you. I am mainly practicing this to try and break a habit of just playing the A major scale if the Key is Amaj.
#6
Quote by Jaffaps2
Of course you can buddy, that is how solos are made!

See what goes well together and make sure it is tasteful and doesn't sound like chalk and cheese. If it is in a minor key, stick with a minor scale or mode, that is what I think anyways.


Well no, you can play the relative minor of a major key, for example if you're soloing in G major, you can pass into Ab minor.
#7
Quote by meyekal
My impression is that alot of it is just style and how you want play. Something I saw mentioned here that I have been working on is changing the scale to go along with chord changes. For example, if the song is in A major, I will use notes from the A major scale, but once the underlying chord switches to something like Bm, I will start using notes from the Bm scale.

Most of it is just style anyway, so go with what sounds best to you. I am mainly practicing this to try and break a habit of just playing the A major scale if the Key is Amaj.



This is a very jazz approach. Good on you!

Cody, I will just assume you made a typo in saying that G major and Abminor are relative. <3
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#8
Quote by codybcool
Well no, you can play the relative minor of a major key, for example if you're soloing in G major, you can pass into Ab minor.


sorry i forgot about relatives too...it was early in the morning when I wrote it give me a break!
#10
Quote by codybcool
Meh i'm relatively new to theory, but yes it was a typo
:stickpoke



haha, it's all good man! Well, just to clarify, E minor is the relative minor of G major. Questions? Ask!
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.