#1
ok so the chords that are generally in a key r in a set order- major minor minor major major minor dim. so where do 7 chords fit in?


wait i just had a thought as i was typing this. am i meant to use dominant 7 for minor, Major 7 for Major, minor/Major 7 for minor, Major #5 for Major and so on and so forth?
Last edited by voodoovee at Sep 2, 2006,
#2
Imaj7 - iimin7 - iiimin7 - IVmaj7 - V7 - vimin7 - viimin7b5


So in C, that would be...


I - Cmaj7.
ii - Dmin7.
iii - Emin7.
IV - Fmaj7.
V - G7.
vi - Amin7.
vii° - Bmin7b5.


You can work them out using a system of thirds, either a major third or a minor third.


[B]Maj7[/B] = M3 + m3 + M3.
[B]Min7[/B] = m3 + M3 + m3.
[B]Dom7[/B] = M3 + m3 + m3.
[B]Min7b5[/B] = m3 + m3 + M3.


Again, C...
[B]C[/B] + M3 = [B]E[/B] + m3 = [B]G[/B] + M3 = [B]B[/B].
And as you know, the notes C - E - G - B make up a Cmaj7.

Same works for Dm...
[B]D[/B] + m3 = [B]F[/B] + M3 = [B]A[/B] + m3 = [B]C[/B]
... and D - F - A - C make up a Dmin7.
#3
Quote by voodoovee
ok so the chords that are generally in a key r in a set order- major minor minor major major minor dim. so where do 7 chords fit in?



That only applies to the major scale, or Ionian mode.

If you use different scales or modes, IE phrygian, harmonic minor etc, then the chord progression, and therefore chord structures change.
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